The Families of Old Taal, Batangas

AGONCILLO.

Felipe Agoncillo.

APACIBLE.

Galicano Apacible.

DE LAS ALAS.

DIOKNO.

GOCO.

ILAGAN.

LONTOK.

MARINO.

Marcela Marino de Agoncillo.

MONTENEGRO.

NOBLE.

OROSA.

VILLAVICENCIO.

Eulalio Villavicencio.

Gliceria Marella de Villavicencio.

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73 Comments

  1. Mary Ann Agustin said,

    April 19, 2014 at 1:34 am

    We are interested in finding out who is the father of Agaton Agoncillo who is the first cousin of Felipe Agoncillo. Agaton Agoncillo is the father of my grandmother Julieta Agoncillo Aceremo. My grandmother was young when her father died and has no memory of her father’s family. Agaton Agoncillo left Batangas as an entrepreneur and eventually settled in Naujan Oriental Mindoro. Thank you for your help. Mary Ann Agustin

  2. Vicente C. Falculan said,

    April 19, 2014 at 12:21 am

    Try FamiySearch. org in tracing you lineage.

  3. January 26, 2014 at 10:11 pm

    I am tracing my family tree of Nicolas Camara who married Gregoria Mariño of Taal, Batangas. She is first cousin of Marcela Mariño Agoncillo who is the mother of the Philippine flag. I appreciate any information.

  4. Sol R. Kaoru said,

    January 23, 2014 at 4:48 pm

    Is there any information about the life of Santiago Encarnacion Agoncillo? I believe my grandmother is a descendant of his.

  5. Angeline Encarnacion de Asis Zabala said,

    January 6, 2014 at 8:21 pm

    My ancestry is from Taal Batangas. we are here in Seattle, Wa for 35 years and they said that Felipe Encarnacion Agoncillo is our great grandfather. I donot know how it connects to my ancestry. My grandpa was Federico Encarnacion and my grandma was Carmen Magsino of Taal Batangas. My late mom was Remedios Encarnacion de Asis. Please help me relate my ancestry I am eager to know and I can explain this to our children here in the states….. thank you!
    Angie de Asis Zabala

  6. Luz P. Mario-Adion said,

    August 31, 2013 at 8:13 am

    Hi! I grew up not knowing how my grandfather was like except for stories about him. His name was Emilio Santos Mario. My mother told us that he had a first family. My grandmother, Efigenia and their only son, Virgilio, who is our father, were said to be his second family. The only info I know about my grandfather was that he was from Batangas. I hope you can help me find the missing family link. Thank you!

  7. robert ascue said,

    June 26, 2013 at 3:37 am

    Can someone help me who knows about the ascue’s of balayan?thanks! :) im robert ascue son of nicomedes ascue and grandchild of Don Nicanor Ascue son of the late gobernadorcillo also of balayan Don Fausto :)

  8. Jun borbon said,

    June 11, 2013 at 4:32 am

    Good day .. I am jun borbon my family is from batangas city.do you have any history of the late brig.gen furtunato tarino borbon,all i know his father is basilio the wife we don’t know who?

  9. February 24, 2013 at 12:34 pm

    Hi would you know anyone named Manuel Reyes Bautista of Batangas City. His spouse was Juana Carag and their children are Bising Mateo, Luz Macapagal, Lily Monoa, Dely Bautista, Manolo Bautista, Hernando Bautista, Arsenio Bautista, Sony Zialcita and David Bautista. He is my great grand father and he lived in Batangas City prior to his stint in Bureau of Internal Revenue at Manila City

  10. Vic Luna said,

    February 15, 2013 at 10:47 pm

    Maria,
    To really impress them, I can send you a picture of the family tree and the branch showing where you are connected, if you send me your email address. I don’t know how to get your email from this thread. This is a very old tree, probably 50 years old already.

  11. Maria Buzeta-Shapiro said,

    February 12, 2013 at 3:11 am

    Just a shout of THANKS to Mr. Vic Luna for all the lead you gave me about my paternal grandfather’s lineage…I impressed my relatives when I went home for our reunion, that it made them want to find out more information.and even thinking of using the original spelling of our last name. Also, you are right Ninang Nini and Tita Minnie are sisters, and their father and my paternal grandmother are cousins.
    Again, thank you.
    Maria

  12. yeye cabrera said,

    February 6, 2013 at 6:39 am

    My grandfather was Jose Villavicencio Cabrera, he married a Chanco-Madrigal of Romblon. I don’t know much about him, but I am interested to know who his parents and sibling were. Any input will be greatly appreciated, thanks.

  13. nimpa laurel said,

    January 18, 2013 at 4:11 pm

    Please help me to trace my ancestors and whos clan where i belong my grandfather is Longhino Laurel married to alejanra robles.my father is mariano robles laurel.they dont know who clan they are belong.thank you

  14. Jan Atienza said,

    November 24, 2012 at 12:46 pm

    Hi. I need help looking for my great grandfather’s family. They are from Talisay, Batangas. A gen or three backwards would be great. His name is Artemio M (purportedly Manimtim) Atienza
    Kindly email me if this is a commissioned research. Many thanks.

  15. Maria J. Buzeta-Shapiro said,

    November 24, 2012 at 5:49 am

    To Vic,
    Thank you again. Sorry I wasn’t able to reply sooner, had no power for over two weeks due to Storm Sandy, that devastated many places here in NY & surrounding areas. Please let me know anything else you can find out.
    Maria Buzeta-Shapiro

  16. Jan Atienza said,

    November 22, 2012 at 9:03 am

    Re: Talisay

    Hello.

    It was my understanding that the family of Wenceslao Trinidad are Lunas themselves aside from the write-up that he married a first cousin of Senedela Luna. This has always been hammered to us since we were kids. We actually still have some minute parcels of land that Gen Aguinaldo purportedly asked permission from my great grandmother Esperanza to pass through.

    Hope someone can shed light to this.

  17. Roger Salceda said,

    November 8, 2012 at 6:52 am

    Hi again. Just a correction to my previous post. Her name is Sylvia and not Elvira as previously mentioned. But her nickname is Elviee

    Thanks and God bless.

  18. Roger Salceda said,

    November 8, 2012 at 4:16 am

    I am looking for a dear friend named Elvira or Elvie from Bukid Batangas City. She is now married and living in Vienna, Austria. It has been more than 25 years since our last communication. The problem was I forgot her family maiden name and I don’t know her married name. I guess I’m looking a needle in a haystack but if you can help me, that will be well appreciated. Or maybe you can direct me to someone or other blogs who can.

    Thanks in advance and God bless you.

    Roger

  19. Vic Luna said,

    November 3, 2012 at 1:16 pm

    Maria,
    I could not connect Angelita Lualhati to Ogie. I could connect Ogie thru his mother, Minnie Lualhati.
    Minnie has a sister, Nini, who got married to Dando Lota y Noble.
    Dando’s mother, Chayong Noble, is the daughter of Pascual Noble.
    Pascual is the brother of Micaela Noble, mother of Honoria Marino, wife of Valentin Buceta.
    It is possible that Angelita is a cousin of Minnie.

  20. maria j. buzeta-shapiro said,

    October 29, 2012 at 3:37 pm

    Hi Vic, I really appreciate all the help you are giving me in tracing my roots. By the way, a relative saw our correspondence & called me, & told me that Ogie is related to us in the Lualhati side, which is my paternal grandmother side. I hope you don’t think I just want to be connected to the famous Taalenos, I only asked about them because my late father used to say that we are related to them & to others that I can’t remember anymore. The funny thing is… I had met two other relatives of Ogie here in NY already, but we’re not related. One is from the Alcasid side & the other one from the De las Alas side. Again, thank you so much.
    Maria

  21. Vic Luna said,

    October 28, 2012 at 9:33 am

    Maria,
    I’m sorry but my research could not connect your Marino to the father, Francisco, or grandfather, Andres, of Marcela. I have not yet connected Ogie to the Noble Clan. There is a Noble who got married to a Lualhati but I have not seen the connection to your Noble. It’s possible that it is a different Noble tree in the Noble forrest.
    If I get a chance to talk to the old folks in Taal, I might be able to get the connection. Unfortunately, I only get a chance to meet the folks during wakes, or some other social affairs.
    It’s a bit difficult to get copies of birth certificates without knowing the birthdates. The documents I get a handwritten documents that are entrusted to me when I borrow them. These are fragile documents which I wouldn’t want to be responsible for. I return as soon as I decipher their contents and cross check with other sources. As soon as I get more information, I may start to get copies of birth, death, or marriage records.

  22. Maria J. Buzeta-Shapiro said,

    October 27, 2012 at 4:26 am

    Wow! Vic you are so knowledgeable about old families of Taal. I still have a lot of research to do,but luckily with your help I have a head start. Hopefully, when I come for a visit in Dec., I will be able to gather more information, or if you won’t mind, can I pick your brain more?…would you be able to tell me how our family is related to Marcela Marino Agoncillo and to Ogie Alcasid? All I know is that his aunt Nini, was my godmother. I really appreciate all the information you had given me already. Unfortunately, my relatives there are not interested in tracing our roots, but being here in the States most of my life, I find it very interesting,especially now that I’m able to attend a few social gatherings of the the Taalenos here in the NorthEast.. Thanks!
    Maria

  23. Vic Luna said,

    October 25, 2012 at 9:06 am

    Maria,
    Ramon has 3 more siblings: Feliza, Marquita, and Tirso. Their father is Valentin married to Honoria. I don’t have a trace on the parents of Valentin. Honoria’s father a Marino, her mother is Micaela Noble, d/o Juan and Dolores Noblejas. Honoria has a sister, Saturnina, who married Teofilo Atienza. Micaela have 8 other siblings: Cecilio, Hipolita, Victoriano, Ramon, Eleuteria, Juan, Francisco, and Pascual

  24. Corinne Malolos said,

    October 14, 2012 at 1:17 am

    Can you help me? I’m searching for the relation of Malolos and Maloles family. We (Malolos) were from Santo Tomas, Batangas. Please help me. Thank you!

  25. cheryl cabrera valle said,

    October 7, 2012 at 10:31 pm

    Amazing. My great grandfather is an Agoncillo-Cabrera while my great grandmother is a Babao. They are from Taal, Batangas and migrated here in Davao City. My middle name is Cabrera. This is a nice article :)

  26. Maria J. Buzeta-Shapiro said,

    October 5, 2012 at 7:37 pm

    Hi Vic,
    Thank you so much for giving me this information. Yes, Honoria was my great-grandmother’s name, and I guessed she was already married to my great-grandfather when he changed the spelling of our last name. I remember my father telling me that his paternal grandfather changed the spelling of the last name, but didn’t know when. Would you be able to tell me more about my ancestors or even just the names of the parents of great-grandparents?
    Again, thank you.
    Maria

  27. Vic Luna said,

    October 5, 2012 at 6:03 am

    To: Darius de las Alas,
    Antonio de las Alas is the son of Cornelio de las Alas and Paula Noble, d/o Victoriano Noble y Noblejas and Maria Marino.
    Antonio has a son, Antonio.

  28. Vic Luna said,

    October 5, 2012 at 5:45 am

    To: Maria Buceta-Shapiro,
    I found a Ramon Buceta (see spelling) at the family painted on the wall of the old house of the Blas family. They are descendants of the Noble family. The mother of Ramon is Honoria Marino y Noble. If this is your family, then you are indeed related to the families you mentioned.

  29. Nicomarc R. Ona said,

    August 30, 2012 at 5:07 pm

    salamat saq impormasyon ona ang apelyido ko at nakita ko ang kasaysayan ng angkan namin

  30. Imelda Aquino said,

    August 29, 2012 at 2:37 am

    I want to buy old jewelry from Taal, Batangas. Please contact me. Thanks.

  31. chel diokno said,

    July 28, 2012 at 11:19 am

    I am a son of Jose W. Diokno. I’m looking for information about Angel Diokno and his wife Andrea Noblejas, parents of Gen. Ananias Diokno (1860-1922). I couldn’t find anything on the net beyond the statement that they are Ananias’ parents….

  32. Richel A. Diokno said,

    June 11, 2012 at 10:57 am

    I am looking for Ramon/Vicente Diokno…

  33. June 10, 2012 at 4:45 pm

    by the way my name is Derrick Gerardo C.Manas of Balayan and Calatagan

  34. June 10, 2012 at 4:44 pm

    If you want to know more about the history of Batangas,use facebook and click History of Batangas,we can explore clans and families for you.Im the President of Diwa ng Batangan (Heritage Conservation Society of Batangas)

  35. Teng Garcia said,

    May 7, 2012 at 8:00 pm

    Anybody know about the descendants of Jacoba Garcia?

  36. Jose Noel s. Villavicencio said,

    April 15, 2012 at 2:57 pm

    Hi, I am quite happy to read an article about the Villavicencio, just li’sthe Orosa’s we are also from Camarines Sur but my father Raymundo Manalo Villavicencio was said to be originally from Batangas but because of the war, they were brought here in bicol of his wandering father, my grandfather. We are the only villavicencio’s here and we do not have relatives that we know, other than my father’s kin. If we can only have a means to determineif we have relationship with the villavicencio’s mentioned in your paper.

  37. Raymond Roxas said,

    April 8, 2012 at 8:19 am

    Can you please help me trace our roots? Our family (Roxas) is from the towns of Calauan and Alaminos, Laguna. My great-grandfather is Andres Cayetano Roxas and he’s the son of Don Mariano Roxas (sibling of Dona Margarita Roxas de Ayala). Nobody alive in our family knows any information on Andres Cayetano Roxas except that he was married to Julia Banzuela of Alaminos, Laguna. Thanks

  38. Jose Rodriguez Agoncillo said,

    February 7, 2012 at 10:56 am

    I am 76 yrs, a retired doctor residing in North Carolina USA. I had always pursued all my life my Roots. The best I recall about my grandfather Salvador Agoncillo(dec 1947) used to mention to his 5 children Jose Sr,(dec2001), Aurora (dec 1959) Jovita (dec2003) Florencio(dec 2009) Virginia (dec1946) he left Batangas for Cavite, Don Felipe was his uncle, took care of him and his brothers and a sister who later left for Capiz. I went through your historical ancestral lineage with great interest and admiration. I came to wonder about the older brothers of Felipe Mariano and Elias. I will greatly appreciate an information of their family tree extension. I wwill be very happy to provide that of Salvador. Thank you very much.

  39. Cheryl Cabrera Valle said,

    November 5, 2011 at 5:23 am

    I wonder how can I trace my ancestry. The only information that I have is that I have a great grandparents that came from Taal, Batangas that migrated here in Davao City. Their names are Emilio Agoncillo Cabrera and Maria Babao-Cabrera. My grandfather is Cesar Cabrera Sr. I am totally clueless about the history of my family because all of them are deceased already :)

  40. Marina Sanchez said,

    September 1, 2011 at 5:30 am

    Alicia,

    What a coincidence. Lily’s sister Ching de las Alas-Montinola remembers the same thing.

    Marina Sanchez

  41. Alicia Perez said,

    August 31, 2011 at 5:19 pm

    On the lighter side…

    I remember the late and famously beautiful Lily Lontok de las Alas-Padilla [ Mrs. Ambrosio Bibby Padilla ] who used to say that whatever good looks she and her siblings had were definitely from their Lontok side [ two of the late Lily's sisters are Ching de las Alas-Montinola and Menchu de las Alas-Concepcion ]. The Lontok were Chinese and Spanish mestizos known for their good looks, specially their beautiful eyes. According to Lily herself in a lighthearted moment, the de las Alas were “pangit, pandak, at maitim” [ "ugly, short, and dark" ]. Among family and close friends, she took mock-offense when described as a “de las Alas” because of the mental association with unattractive people. However, her father, Antonio de las Alas, had handsome mestizo features although he was “moreno.”

    Just a recollection…

    Alicia Perez

  42. August 31, 2011 at 4:55 pm

    I’d love to know more about the de las alas family. i dont even know my great grandfather’s name :( my grandfather is Rosendo de las Alas, I think he’s from San Luis, Batangas. that’s all i know. Thanks in advance :)

  43. ceci de ocampo limcaco said,

    August 24, 2011 at 7:39 am

    I would like to know more about the M Ylustre de Ocampo family history
    thanks in advance!

  44. July 24, 2011 at 3:11 pm

    jose:

    Please be reminded:

    From now on, comments with no real names, no email addresses that can be confirmed, and no reliable identity checks will no longer be allowed.

    Thank you.

    Toto Gonzalez

  45. July 19, 2011 at 11:48 am

    M. DeLasAlas:

    Please be reminded:

    From now on, comments with no real names, no email addresses that can be confirmed, and no reliable identity checks will no longer be allowed.

    Please upload your comment again with the pertinent information.

    Thank you.

    Toto Gonzalez

  46. Mike Ignacio said,

    June 27, 2011 at 9:08 pm

    Greetings from the Descendants of Don Perpetuo Agoncillo and Doña Fidela Marasigan de Agoncillo.

    Don Perpetuo Agoncillo and Doña Fidela Marasigan de Agoncillo were a prominent couple from Taal, Batangas in the mid to late 1800s. Both hailed from landed families and had eleven children. Don Perpetuo ran a highly successful shipping business during the latter years of the Spanish rule up to the time of the Japanese Occupation in the Philippines.

    Their children were: Hospicio, Maura Agoncillo de Frial, Rosario Agoncillo de Calicdan, Vicente Agoncillo, Artemio Agoncillo, Manuel Agoncillo, Pacita Agoncillo, Juanito Agoncillo, Matilda Agoncillo and Antonio Agoncillo.

    Perpetuo was a close relation of Felipe Agoncillo, the first Filipino Diplomat and husband of Marcela Agoncillo, who sewed the first Philippine Flag. Marcela gave one of her thimbles to Maura Agoncillo. This was donated by one of her daughters to Imelda Marcos. The thimble now sits on display at the Malacanang Museum.

    We would like to establish our actual links to the other Agoncillo families from Taal, Batangas. One Branch descends from Ignacio Agoncillo.

  47. Jose Mari de Ocampo said,

    June 19, 2011 at 10:36 am

    Correction,I believe Mariquita and Gervasio de Ocampo had eight children and some of them are not mentioned here. I’m the grandson of one of their children. Would you have other researches about the other kids? If so, please send to the email address i posted when i commented. Thanks.

  48. Noel Orosa said,

    May 24, 2011 at 5:15 pm

    May I know how you were able to research all of these? Would really like to know your sources as your knowledge of these seems to be quite thorough.

  49. Noel Orosa said,

    May 24, 2011 at 5:08 pm

    This article is so enlightening. Many thanks!

    - Noel Orosa -

  50. derrick manas said,

    May 24, 2011 at 4:18 pm

    I belong to an old family of Balayan.The Ocsons and the Ascues.Many old families in Taal were good friends of my ancestors.Great to see this page

  51. Mario Agoncillo said,

    May 23, 2011 at 8:27 am

    I am mario agoncillo, son of ananias agoncillo (from maasin, hindang, leyte), son of teofisto agoncillo, son of custodio agoncillo (allegedly from lemery, batangas) and nicolasa clavejo. just want to know if you have any information about our relationship with the agoncillos of batangas.

  52. myra feniza said,

    May 14, 2011 at 1:27 pm

    what was the name of the first wife of don ramon diokno? how many children did he have with his first wife? would you also know don ramon’s siblings?

    thanks, awaiting your kind reply.

  53. Maria J. Buzeta-Shapiro said,

    March 18, 2011 at 2:52 am

    Hi, I’m wondering if you can help me trace my paternal-family tree. My father’s parents are both from Taal. My grandfather’s name is Ramon Marino Buzeta and my grandmother’s maiden name is Angelita Lualhati. According to my late father, we are related to the Cabreras, Noble, Huerto, even to Ogie Alcasid & others that I can no longer remember. I would appreciate all the help you can give me, so that I can pass on the information to my two sons. I want them to know and be proud of their Pilipino heritage. Thank you.

  54. ma.estrella Manguiat Recto said,

    March 12, 2011 at 3:23 am

    Eugenio Manguiat my grandfather donated a land to rosario, batangas for public market way back 1911,I wanted to know where can I find the record,since the public market was no longer there and now the multi purpose hall and Hall of justice is now erected on that property,I wanted to seek the record,why the municipal government did not put any landmark that the property was donated by my grandfather, eugenio manguiat,it is located at v. escano street, rosario, Batangas,I wanted toseek justice on this cause.

  55. Darius de las Alas said,

    February 1, 2011 at 7:44 am

    Hello Hillary.

    Thank you for the info.

    I think the Conchita is not the Gruezo. Conchita Lualhati may be the one related to Ogie Alcasid’s Mom, who has de las Alas blood also.

    I would love to find out about the Family Tree from Cornelio de las Alas and how it branches out. My grandfather is also named Antonio de las Alas, Sr but not Don Antonio. Our family tree stopped at my great grandfather and want to know more.

  56. January 29, 2011 at 4:00 pm

    Sorry that is not Conchita Gruezo not the right one. So not sure on that one.

  57. January 29, 2011 at 3:58 pm

    Darius, I believe you are asking about Conchita who is not related by blood to Don Antonio Sr. He married her daughter Necitas Gruezo. As for Cornelio I believe you are asking about Don Antonio’s father and his mother Paula Noble. I am wife to Cornelio de las Alas who is named for his grandfather. Hope this helps Hilary

  58. AUREO P. ROXAS said,

    January 19, 2011 at 5:57 pm

    Could please help me trace my roots. How is Capitan Sixto Roxas related to Don Ubaldo Roxas.? I’m from Ibaan and descendant of Don Ubaldo Roxas, one of his sons (Bernabe) is my great-great grandpa. Bernabe’s only sister Crisanta, is the mother of Damaso Bago, mentioned in Ibaan section.
    Thanks a lot..

  59. Edison C. Buno said,

    January 3, 2011 at 12:05 am

    I’m trying to trace my family history. I was wondering if you can help me out. All I know is my Great grandfather was Buenaventura Cabrera Buno. He became the Chief of Police in Taal. I’m not sure when. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

  60. Darius de las Alas said,

    December 22, 2010 at 10:25 am

    How are Conchita Lualhati and Don Antonio de las Alas, Sr related? Also, would you have information on Cornelio de las Alas and Paula Noble? Their background ?

  61. Enrique Bustos said,

    November 19, 2010 at 6:13 am

    The Grand Mother of Lily delas Alas-Padilla and Menchu delas Alas-Concepcion Maria Marino the younger sister of Marcela Marino-Agoncillo she married Vicente Lontok

  62. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 16, 2010 at 8:39 am

    Ramon Agoncillo Married Gregoria Encarnacion their children are the FF
    1.Flaviano
    2.Elias
    3.Felipe Married Marcela Marino daughter of Francisco & Eugenia Marino their other children are 1.Maria 2.Marina Married a Lontok 3.Policarpio 4.Mariano

    Felipe & Marcela Agoncillo’s children are the FF
    1.Lorenzo
    2.Gregoria
    3.Eugenio
    4.Marcelo

  63. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 16, 2010 at 8:33 am

    Leoncio Noble married Maria Agoncillo their children are the FF
    1.Froilan
    2.Vicente
    3.Anita married architect Juan Nakpil

  64. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 16, 2010 at 8:27 am

    Vicente Apacible married Catalina Castillo daughter of Pastor Castillo and Isabela Isaac whose family are the original owner of Hacienda de Nasugbu in Batangas
    their children are
    1.Modesta
    2.Leon
    3.Galicano married Concepcion Castillo

  65. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 7, 2010 at 3:55 am

    From the website of the Orosa family http://www.orosa.org

    From our earliest memories, we thought that the only Philippine Orosas came from Batangas province, originating from the town of Taal on the shores of its namesake lake and volcano. We always knew of two Orosa brothers, Guillermo and Basilio. Guillermo had only one son, Simplicio, from whom all Bauan Orosas originate. Simplicio moved his family from Taal to Bauan around 1900. Basilio stayed in Taal and his children spread from there, some staying (one became Mayor) while others went to Pola in Mindoro, and the provinces of Laguna, Cavite and beyond. But much later on, in early 2002, we discovered the existence of a third brother, Santiago.

    A few years ago, a family of Orosas hailing from the province of Camarines Sur was uncovered somewhat by accident. We have established and maintain numerous contacts with the Camarines Orosa. We discovered that there was communication between the Camarines and Batangas Orosas as far back as 1941 but was terminated as a result of the war. Unfortunately, the letters didn’t survive. The Orosa surname is more widespread in the Philippines than we imagined. Two years ago, a DNA test was conducted on a Camarines and a Batangas Orosa with results indicating that we are not blood related. But they are kindred spirits, so we will continue to include and update information on our Camarines breathren.

    Of course there are Orosas throughout Latin America and Spain, home of the original surname. There have been several inquiries from Spanish, Mexican, Cuban and Americans with either an Orosa surname, marriage to an Orosa or other Orosa heritage including spelling variants such as Oroza. It is almost certain that we are not related unless such a relationship occurred before the 19th century with a Spanish or Mexican Orosa venturing to the Philippines. It would take a challenging detective endeavor to find out. A Spanish page has been created for our Latin American and Spanish friends.

    Objective: This web site has two objectives. The first is to disseminate and share information (such as family lists, photographs and memories) among the Orosas of Batangas, and Camarines Orosas. Secondly to foster research into our origins. Unfortunately at this point we can only go back to the generation of Guillermo, Basilio and Santiago who by the birthdates of their children would have been born in the decade around 1840. (For example Guillermo’s son Simplicio was born in 1865.)

    Perspective: Much of the information in this website is written from the perspective of a Bauan Orosa although the intent is to be all inclusive. (All relevant information received will be published.) Each one of us among the Bauan Orosas can trace our roots to Juliana Ylagan and Simplicio Orosa by birth or marriage. Simplicio and Juliana both originally hailed from Taal, Batangas. Juliana was born in 1863, Simplicio in 1865. Simplicio’s parents were Guillermo Orosa and Hilaria Agoncillo. Hilaria’s parents were Vicente Agoncillo and Micaela Encarnacion. Juliana’s parents were Pedro Ylagan and Micaela de Castro. Tracing back from Guillermo and Hilaria, we are into the seventh generation, or if traced from Hilaria’s parents, we are into the eight generation. In another decade or so, we could be into the ninth generation. To see the family tree of our earliest forbears or the first four generations, go to: Early Family Tree. While Simplicio was an only child, Basilio had several who either stayed in Taal or moved to nearby towns and provinces. To see this side, go to: Basilio Orosa Branch. We don’t know who the three brothers’ parents were. Other than her parents identity, we don’t have any other information on the family of Juliana, more popularly known as Lola Kanang. Besides our parents, aunts and uncles, Lola Kanang is the only ancestor whom any of us senior citizens in the fourth (or fifth) generation can remember. Intuition tells us that there might’ve been siblings to Juliana or Simplicio (even if they did not survive to adulthood) since families were much larger during those days but this is where our documentation ends. On the Basilio branch, there are a number of his grandchildren that survive and who remember all of Basilio’s children.

    Numbers: The total surviving number descended from Guillermo and Simplicio on down, not including spouses, is approximately 330. There are 20 of us in the senior citizen or fifth generation ranging in age from fifty to eighty-seven. The sixth generation totals about 132 and the seventh generation is another 132. However, this group is “undercounted” due to an incomplete list. There are 30 in the 8th generation all under fifteen years old. Counting the Batangas Orosas descended from Basilio, Guillermo and Santiago Orosa, all from Taal, we are in the 800 or more range, scattered all over the globe. Including the Camarines Sur Orosas and a branch (Gregorio Orosa Sr.) that we are looking into, our numbers approach 1,000. All figures are direct descendants and do not include the spouses. Basilio’s descendants are the most numerous, easily exceeding 400.

    Where we are: Doing an actual name by name count, an astounding 40% of the Bauan Orosa descendants live abroad. That includes children born abroad (some of whom have never set foot in the Philippines) but this figure could go higher if we had a more thorough accounting. Approximately half are Philippine born and bred, like your chronicler. Some complete or nearly complete families have migrated such as those of Alice Orosa Tigno, Ricardo Q. Orosa and Nicolas Q. Orosa. Of those abroad, we live in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, even Western Australia) Canada (British Columbia, Alberta & Ontario,) Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, Sweden, United Kingdon (England & Scotland) with the most numerous in the United States. Your chronicler’s American born daughter is in the process of moving to Dubai. We live in at least 8 states, from New York to California. At one time we had representatives in Africa. In another illustration of the dramatic demographic shift, none of the three hundred plus descendants of Simplicio & Juliana Orosa have stayed in Bauan. A few of Basilio’s heirs continue to have ties to Taal such as second homes

  66. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 7, 2010 at 3:18 am

    The Ancestor of the Goco family is JUAN CABRERA GOCO he married LORENZA DEOMAMPO their children are the FF
    1.TOMASINA Goco Encarnacion
    2.MARIA Goco Asinas
    3.CIRILA Goco Villamin
    4.EMILIA Goco Mangubat
    5.JOSEFA
    6.ELISEO married to Elisa Ilustre their son is Raul Goco former solicitor general he married Marietta Primicias eldest daughter of the late Senator Cipriano Primicias of Lingayen, Pangasinan
    7.JOSE married to Josefa Punzalan

  67. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 6, 2010 at 4:54 pm

    Ramon Diokno married Leonor wright their children are the FF
    1.Paulina
    2.Luz
    3.Rosario
    4.Nora
    5.Antonio
    6.Mercedes
    7.Jose
    8.Angela
    9.Irene

    Jose Diokno married Carmen Reyes Icasiano their children are the FF

    1.Carmen Leonor
    2.Jose Ramon
    3.Maria de la Paz
    4. Maria Serena
    5.Maria Teresa
    6.Maria Socorro
    7.Jose Miguel
    8.Jose Manuel
    9.Maria Victoria
    10.Martin Jose

  68. Enrique Bustos said,

    September 6, 2010 at 4:43 pm

    The parents of Antonio de las Alas were Cornelio de las Alas and Paula Noble. Antonio de las Alas married Natividad Lontok and their children are the following:
    1. Lily married Ambrosio Padilla
    2. Antonio married Teresita Gocolay
    3. Natividad married Ramon Cojuangco
    4. Adelina married Patricio Villegas
    5. Angelina married Vicente Ilustre
    6. Teresita married Eduardo Fernando
    7. Alfredo married Carmen Medel
    8. Remedios married Donald Kendil
    9. Pacita married Sergio Montinola
    10. Carmencita married Raul Concepcion

  69. Noni Agulto said,

    July 1, 2010 at 8:12 am

    Our Trade Assistant Secretary, Felicitas Rono Agoncillo – Reyes proudly traces her roots from Dna. Marcela Agoncillo…=)

  70. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 22, 2010 at 12:25 pm

    from “Batangas: Forged in Fire” edited by Ramon N. Villegas, Ayala Foundation [ section written by Martin I. Tinio Jr. ]:

    fifty rifles.
    Their sister Clemencia, then thirty years old, decided to go to America, learn English, and plead with President McKinley for the release of her brothers and the return of their possessions. Successful in her mission, she was the first Filipino to step into the White House.
    Natalio’s eldest son, Mariano, had three daughters. The eldest daughter, Socorro, married the gastro-enterologist and society doctor, Agustin Liboro, from Lubang Mindoro. Liboro’s child, Conchita, married Tomas Benitez, the brother of Senator Helena Benitez. Mariano’s elder daughter, Mercedes, married Jose Araneta, the eldest son of Aguinaldo’s secretary of Finance, Don Gregorio Araneta. Jose’s son, Gregorio, was the Tourism undersecretary during the Marcos administration. Mariano’s youngest daughter, Conchita, married Dr. Victor Sevilla of San Miguel, Bulacan. Their son, Dr. Carlos Sevilla, was one of the country’s leading eye, ear, nose, throat specialists. Carlos’ daughter, Conchitina Sevilla Bernardo, was a popular fashion model, the vice mayor of Makati in 1993, and former editor of the Elan section of the Philippine Daily Inquirer. Her husband is now in Spain.
    Natalio’s youngest son, Jose, studied naval architecture in England. He married Rosario Solis of Lipa. Jose’s daughter, Emma, married Vicente Yupangco and his other daughter, Beatrice, married Jose Fernandez. Jose Lopez’s only son, Enrique, married Wendy, an Engishwoman and had four children: Diana Jeanne, Marybeth, Vicky and Richard. The beautiful Diana Jeanne married Colombian Miguel Bermudez. Marybeth, widow of racecar enthusiast Jaime Prieto, later married Jose Vicente Madrigal de Leon. Vicky married Emilio Tuason and only son Richard is now married to Sandra Battistuzzi of Negros Occidental.
    The Martinezes are descended from Spanish meztiso Franciso Garcia Martinez who married an Ilustre. He was gobernadorcillo (1185-1886) but was exiled to Calapan, Mindoro after an altercation with the parish priest regarding town cemetery works. In 1897, he was appointed town executive by the Spaniards after the incumbent was removed for complicity in the Revolution. He was re-elected in 1898. His son, Pedro Martinez, was also gobernadorcillo (1889-1890, 1892-1894).
    Don Pedro was very enterprising, even as a young man. By the 1870’s, he had acquired Binondo properties as well as almost two thousand hectares in Batangas. He was said to have been the fourth Filipino millionaire. Even in old age he invested in the new Manila Hotel. He married Roman Ascue of Balayan, and sired ten sons but only one daughter. Like his neighbour, Natalio Lopez, Don Pedro sent three of his sons, Mariano, Claudio and Pio, to England for further education. Upon their return, the brothers went into shipping. They became mayors: Franciso (1910-1912) and Mariano (1915-1916). Pio and Leon, another Martinez son, later occupied the same position.
    Eldest son Mariano (presidente municipal, 1915-1916) wanted to become a soldier, but with his height of five feet three inches, he did not meet the minimum height requirement. Mariano’s brother, Pio, sought out President Quezon, who reduced the height requirement. Mariano became a Philippine army lieutenant. Pio was a very good friend of the Quezons, helping him financially when Quezon was still a student. The suit worn by Quezon when he was sworn in as president was a gift from Pio. Pio married Mariquita Ramos.
    Claudio Martinez, while in England, fell in love with and married Ida Evelyn. Claudio did not bring her to live in Balayan but housed her in a Manila Hotel suite until she died. Their daughter Girlie married cardiologist Dr. Antonio Ordoñez. Girlie’s eldest son, Percival, was Education undersecretary during the Marcos administration and is now United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Asia-Pacific regional head. Another son, Ernesto, is currently Trade and Industry undersecretary.
    Leon Martinez was a doctor, aside from town mayor of one time. He married Asuncion Lainez of Balayan. Their grandson, Leo Martinez, is a well-known comedian.
    Don Pedro’s only daughter was Germana. She married Jose Eduque of Balayan. They had two sons, Mandy and Tito, and a daughter, Elsie. Eldest son Mandy married Elvira Ledesma (Later Mrs. Constantino Manahan); he died without seeing their son, Mandy Edeque, jr., who married Chuchu Madrigal, granddaughter of Don Vicente Madrigal. Germana’s second son Valentin, or Tito, married Inday Vargas, daughter of Jorge Vargas, Quezon’s Executive secretary. Tito, together with nephew-in-law Vic-Vic Villavicencio, put up Kamayan Restaurant. Germana’s only daughter, Elsie, married a Tabora of Agoo. La Union.
    The Apacibles are descended from Agustin (gobernadorcillo, 1865-1867) and Juan (gobernadorcillo, 1873-1875) Apacible. Juan’s son Vicente Apacible married Catalina Castillo, owner of the thirteen thousand hectare Hacienda de Calatagan before it was sold in 1837 to Domingo Roxas, The founder of the Roxas-Zobel-Ayala-Soriano fortune. Vicente’s sons , Galicano and Leon, were classmates and good friends of Jose Rizal. While studying at Ateneo, they all lived in an Intramuros lodging house owned by Leonor Rivera’s parents. Leon married Taal heiress, Matilde Martinez. Galicano, a doctor (governor, 1908-1910) was elected twice to the Philippine Assembly and became Agriculture and Natural Resources secretary in 1917. Galicano married his first cousin, Concepcion Castillo. Their daughter, Catalina “Neny” Apacible, was Carnibal Queen of 1923. She married Pedro Limjap, brother of Esperanza Limjap who became the second wife of President Sergio Osmeña. Their son, Eduardo Limjap, married the daughter of General Tobias, Caridad Tobias. Neny and Pedro’s daughter, Connie Limjap, was formerly married to the brother Of Senator Teofisto Guingona, Jose. She is now the wife of Eddie Lichauco. Connie’s sister, Evelyn, married an Ignacio from Mindoro.
    The Balayan Ramoses are descended from Crisanto Ramos (gobernadorcillo, 1859-1860). His son, Vivencio, became the first doctor in Balayan in 1984. Vivencio’s son, Virgilio, also a doctor, became dean of the University of Santo Tomas (U.S.T.) College of Medicine and director of U.S.T. Hospital. Vivencio’s daughter, Mariquita, married Pio Martinez. Another daughter, Milagros, married Dr. Crisogono Ermita and sired former congressman General Eduardo Ermita. (Tinio 2002: p.178-200)
    Presently, Eduardo Ermita is the executive secretary of President Gloria M. Arroyo.

    [ Correction as of March 6, 2010:
    (Katigbak Family)Their eldest son, Mariano Solis Katigbak (gobernadorcillo, 1896-1897), was Jose Rizal’s classmate at Ateneo. He married Rosario Luz, half sister of Manuel Luz, his brother in law. Prior to his marriage to Rosario Luz he married first Ysabel Ramirez Macarandang. ]

  71. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 22, 2010 at 12:23 pm

    from “Batangas: Forged in Fire” edited by Ramon N. Villegas, Ayala Foundation [ section written by Martin I. Tinio Jr. ]:

    he simply took the door off its hinges, lugged it to court, presented it to the judge as evidence, and won the case! He married Rafaela dinglasan, a Batangueña whose brother emigrated to Capiz and founded the Dinglasan clan there. Kind-hearted, Remigio allowed women to take pawned jewelry out to wear for the fiesta, even without paying the loans. Of course, many of them did not bother to return the pieces afterwards. He used to go around dispensing pills and prescriptions to whoever was suffering from any ailment. Once, he went to a barrio with his daughter, a doctor. The townspeople lined up before him and insisted that he,and not his doctor daughter, should examine them. Such was their faith.
    Remigio and Rafaela had several daughters: Severina, Manuela, Francisca, and Consuelo; and two sons: Maximino and Esteban. Severina, the valedictorian at the U.P. School of Medicine in 1914, married her classmate, Dr. Sixto Orosa of Taal. Manuela was the second wife of Don Pablo Borbon. Francisca married her first cousin Benidicto Luna. Consuelo married Dr. Narciso Cordero from Pansanjan; their daughter Gilda Cordero, noted writer and publisher, married President Aquino’s Energy secretary, Marcelo Fernando of Bulacan. Maximino married his first cousin, Felicidad Arenas. Esteban married Mariquita Alegre.
    Benedicto and Bernabela Luna’s other son migrated to Malabon and had a son named after grandfather Benedicto, as well as two daughters, Virginia and Felicidad. Grandson Benedicto Luna married his first cousin, Francisca Luna, the daughter of Don Remigio. Benidicto and Francisca’s daughter, Clarita, married Federico Santos while Benedicto’s younger sister, Felicidad, married Judge Arsenio Santos of Malabon (not related to the Navotas Santoses). Their son, Mario Luna Santos, married his first cousin, Alicia Luna Santos, daughter of Augusto and Virginia

    Santo Tomas

    The first Batangas town on the road from Manila is Santo Tomas. Among the prominent families of the town are the Malvars. They are originally from Batac, Ilocos Norte and are related to the Vers. The Batangas Malvars trace their ancestry to Maximo Malvar who married Tiburcio Carpio. Their son Miguel (gobernadorcillo, 1892- 1894) married Paula Maloles of the town’s original principalia. Miguel profited from the location of Santo Tomas between Calamba, Laguna and Tanauan, Batangas. He became the industrial partner of Saturnina Rizal. Hidalgo, Jose Rizal’s eldest sister, lent Malvar P 1 000(P500 000.00 today) to buy and sell products. Even Don Carlos Palanca lent him large sums without collateral to invest in sugar tradings. Profits were invested in lands in Santo Tomas and the foothills of Mount Makiling. He pioneered the planting and propagation of native oranges or dalanghita. The Malvar variety was named after him.
    Disenchanted with Spanish intervention in local politics, he became a revolutionary, achieving the rank of general and finally assuming the residency after Aguinaldo surrendered. Malvar himself surrendered in 1906 and devoted the rest of his life to agriculture. Miguel’s children are Aurelia, Paula, Bernabe, Crispina, Isabela, Luz, Mariquita, Miguel Jr., and Pablo.
    Miguel Jr. (Mimo or Pinkit) was Batangas governor(1941-1945) who married the sister of writer Celso Carunungan. Miguel Jr.’s sister, Aurelia married Feliciano Leviste. Batangas governor for generation.
    Bernabe married an Arguelles, the grand nephew of Jose Rizal. Crispina married Bibiano Meer. Luz married Aproniano Castilio, the uncle of La Salle’s Exaltacion Castillo Ramos.
    Isabela married Dr. Jose Villegas. Their son, Bernardo, a writer and economist, helped found Opus Dei in the country. Jose Jr. is a labor leader and politician. Edberto is an activist and a U.P. Manila professor.
    According to Bernado M. Villegas, at present the only surviving child of General Miguel is Dr. Isabel Malvar Villegas, ninety-five years old (95) . Malvar had eleven child with his wife Paula Maldes.(Villegas 2004: 11 and B-11)
    Miguel ‘s brother, Potenciano Malvar, became a doctor and married Eusebia Fule of San Pablo. They built the landmark, “bahay na puti”, in the town, the only house not torched when the Japanese left. The carved chrysanthemums decorating its ceilings made it worthy as the Emperor’s Shine; the house escaped destruction. The childless couple adopted Nene, who married Congressman Roque of Bulacan. Nene’s daughter, Evie, married Johnny Salvador whose mother is a Laperal. Nene’s son, Chito is a renowned gamester who married Lucy Padilla, daughter of Lily de las Alas.
    The Maloles family traces their roots from Ambrocio Maloles, capitan municipal in the late nineteenth century. He had a daughter, Paula, and son, Eustacio. Paula married General Miguel Malvar. Eustacio married Crispina Chavez; among Eustacio and Crispina’s children were Eustacio Jr., Crispina, Cesar, and Octavio.
    Dr. Eustacio Maloles, Jr. married Soledad Villegas, first cousin of Dr. Jose Villegas, husband of Miguel Malvar’s daughter, Isabel. Crispina married Tayabas congressman Vilar. Octavio, who studied in Vienna, and who became ambassador to Mexico, married Alicia de Santos, who owned vast lands in Nueva Ecija and was a major financier of the Philippine Revolution.
    Marcelino Villegas, the town’s president during the height of the Philippine- American war, helped the our revolutionaries, led by Malvar. He was related to Felipe Villegas, who married Apolonia Angeles of Sarrat, Ilocos Norte where the Malvars also trace their roots. Felipe’s youngest and only daughter, Eusebia, was a spinster; his sons were Eustaquio, Jose and Rosendo. Eustaquio married Remedios Villanueva of Calamba; one of their children started the manufacturing of Fila sportswear in the country. Jose, a doctor, worked with the Health Department and married Isabela Malvar. Rosendo married Iluminada Nazareth of Tanauan and Talasay.

    Tanauan City
    The next town is Tanauan City. The town’s prosperity was due to the industriousness of its inhabitants who, according to Sastron in 1895, still next only to Taalenos in industry. Tanauan’s farmers produced cash crops sent to Manila by way of Calamba.
    The Ansaldos are the oldest prominent family although they are now thought to be from Negros. The patriarch was probably a Spaniard who was among the first to use iron-tipped plows drawn by two oxen. His agricultural ventures paid off and he was able to acquire large tracts of land in Tanuan and engage in other profitable enterprises. By 1790 he had become so rich that even Fr. Andres de Castro, the Augustinian friar who visited him, was astounded to see that his entire table service, including plates, was of solid silver! Later generations of the family eventually ended up in Manila as absentee landlords living in Intramuros.
    Among his descendants is the prioress of Assumption Convent who oversaw the transfer of the Ermita campus to Antipolo. Her brother, Jose Ansaldo, is a champion tennis player and a stockbroker who married Margarita Wittaker, daughter of the First Philippine Trust president. Jose’s son, Roberto, was Agriculture undersecretary under Ramos. His daughter, Margarita Ansaldo, married Jesus Tambunting, the former ambassador to the Court of St. James. Another, daughter, Mary Ann, married Jose Mari Chan, the sugar tycoon and well known composer.
    The Almedas are descended from Ponciano Almeda, originally from Pateros, Rizal. A sugar trader, he married Severina Trinidad who had sugar lands in Tanauan. Ponciano was very enterprising, establishing the first bakery there during the Spanish period. He went into copra trading in the early 1900s. His sons are Felipe, Domingo, and Dominador.
    Felipe was among the first graduates from the U.P. School of Medicine in 1912. The obstetrician Domingo married a Fule of San Pablo; his son Melecio migrated to Australia. Dominador migrated to Bicol after graduation and established a practice in Naga together with his pharmacist wife; their son Emmaneual is a noted eye doctor in Manila.
    Ponciano’s daughters married contractors. Fredeswina married David Consunji from Dinalupihan, Bataan. Angelita married Felipe F. Cruz from Angat, Bulacan; their son, Philip Cruz Jr., who now construction company, was the first husband of Gina Vera-Perez. Felipe is also the father of American fashion magnate Josie Cruz Natori.
    The Laurels are descended from Mariano Laurel whose son Sotero was a classmate of Felipe Agoncillo at U.S.T. Sotero was the first lawyer in Tanuan, a colonel during the Revolution, delegate to the Malolos Congress, and Aguinaldo’s Interior secretary. He married Jacoba Garcia and their descendants are now the town’s most prominent families. Sotero’s son Jose Ponciano Laurel got his doctorate in Civil Laws from Yale in 1920. In 1922, he became Interior secretary. He became a senator (1925, 1928). He was a presiding officer of the 1935 Constitutional convention, associate justice of the Supreme Court in 1936, chief justice in 1941, justice and then Interior commissioner (1942-1943). In 1943, he became president of the Republic. He was a postwar senator. In 1952, he found Lyceum and the Philippines Banking Corporation in 1957. He died in 1959. He married Paciencia Hidalgo. Their sons were Jose Jr., Jose III, Mariano, Sotero, Salvador, and Arsenio “Dojie”.
    Jose B. Laurel, Jr. was a congressman (1941-1957, 1962, become the Speaker from 1966-1971). His son, Jose Macario IV, became a congressman.Jose Jr.’s daughter, Lally, was also elected to Congress (1987-1998). She married Noel “Kokoy” Trinidad.
    Jose Laurel III, former ambassador to Tokyo, married Betty Castilo, was governor (1980 to 1988) and the father of Rajo laurel, a popular young couturier.
    Sotero Laurel became a senator in 1987. He married Lorna Perez, niece of Speaker Eugenio Perez.
    Salvador was Aquino’s vice president from 1986. He married Celia Diaz of the Locsin clan, Bicol branch. Celia Laurel is a stage actress and their eldest son, Cocoy, has appeared in theater productions abroad.
    Mariano Laurel is the chairman of Philbanking Corporation. He married Alice Yulo.
    Rosendo “Rosie” Laurel married Jesus Avancena, head of Development Bank of the Philippine’s legal department, and the son of a chief justice who was Nini Quezon’s brother in law.
    Potenciana Laurel married Gary Yupangco of the piano-manufacturing family.
    Tanauan also has Castillos. Former Batangas governor Modesto Castillio was the father of Carmelite novice Teresita Castillo, who along with first cousin Leon Garcia migrated to Davao City and became very successful. Leon later became Davao mayor. Both married into the Monteverde family. Castillo’s sister is the mother of Davao congressman Boy Nograles. Leon’s daughter, Inday, married a del Rosario, another propertied Davao family.
    A second cousin of Governor Castillo was Gorgonio Nazareth, married to an Opulencia, who opened a plateria on the ground floor of his house near the plaza. His son, Felino Nazareth, married Senedela Malabanan of Talisay.

    TALISAY

    The Malabanans of Talisay are descended from Nicolas Malabanan, a first cousin of Dona Matilde Martinez and related to the Inumerables. He married Maria Asuncion Luna, daughter of Sergio Luna who was probably a close relative if not a brother of the elder Benedicto Luna. Maria Asuncio Luna’s mother was a Hernandez of San Jose, Batangas, the daughter of Captain Mauricio Hernandez whose second wife was Petra Ortilla of Taal.
    Hernandez-Luna-Malabanan land stretched from Talissay to Tagaytay ridge. Most of the trail from the lakeshore through Mount Sungay, which Aguinaldo used to flee from Cavite and Batangas into Laguna, went through their property. Malabanan was capitan municipal during the Revolution, a difficult position because Spanish forces, waiting to rush Silang’s trenches on the ridge, garrisone, themselves in Talisay.
    Among his children are several sons and two daughters, Valentina and Senedela. Nicolas and Maria Asuncion died young and the zona or hamletting tactic of the Americans made agriculture or pasturage impossible. Astute Valentina took over the family finances, engaging in the textile, garment, and jewelry trades to augment income. Hardly had they recovered when the volcano erupted in 1911. Somehow the family survived. Valentina married, went with her groom to his house, but returned to her home next morning, never to go back except for his funeral. Neither she nor her husband ever offered any explanation.
    Senedela married Feliciano Nazareth of Tanauan and had only one child, Iluminada, who married Rosendo Villegas of Santo Tomas. Iluminada started Capricci, a gallery associated with antique jewelry. Her children Redenta, Ramon, Imelda, and Rosendo Jr. are fourth generation jewelers.
    A first cousin of Senedela Malabanan through the Lunas married her Talisay townmate Wenceslao Trinidad, executive secretary of Manuel Quezon. His daughter Nena married Padro; among their children are Jose Pardo, cabinet member under Corazon Aquino and Joseph Estrada, and Baby Padro Paterno, wife of Vicente Paterno, also Secretary of Trade under Corazon Aquino. Another Trinidad descendant is Wenceslao “Peewee” Trinidad, incumbent mayor of Pasay City.

    Malvar
    Malvar, formed out of parts of other towns but principally from a barrio of Lipa, was the birthplace of the Levistes (originally Labiste). They became prominent because of their long hold on provincial politics. Feliciano “SANOY” leviste became governor in 1948 and served until his death in 1971, an unprecedented feat in Philippine political history. He rebuilt the provincial capitol and governor’s mansion, which he kept open to rich and poor alike. He married AURELIA Malvar of Tanauan, who was affectionately called “Barracuda” by the populace. He and his wife would send whole lechon to large gatherings.Their only son, Expedito (congressman, 1969-1973), married Cristina Borbon of Batangas City.
    The political mantle was carried on by Expedito’s cousin, Antonio Leviste (governor, 1972-1980). His generation made fortunes in real estate, with Levitown subdivisions and condominium buildings. Tony Leviste was formerly married to a Sarangaya, the developers of White Plains in Quezon City. He is married to broadcaster and senator Loren Legarda, now separated. He was the campaign manager of Miriam Defensor Santiago.

    Lipa City

    Lipa’s golden age was in the late nineteenth century when, for a short time, the town was the center of coffee cultivation in the world. Some of the town’s families were among the countries wealthiest. Lipenos were known for intermarrying among themselves, not so much to keep wealth within the family, but because parents did not want to marry people who were not from Lipa. There is a very high incidence of marrying first cousins, particularly among the Katigbak, Luz, Roxas, Kalaw, and Dimayuga clans. Intermarriages continue, as in case of Armando Katigbak Katigbak marrying Lourdes Katigbak Katigbak.
    The Aguileras are descended from a Spaniard, Julian Aguilera, and a Tagala, Fabiana de la Cruz. Their son, Gregorio, married Maria Solis, their son, also named Gregorio, studied in Spain with his first cousin, Lauro Dimayuga, and fellow Lipeno Baldomero Roxas. Part of a group called los indios bravos, Gregorio Solis Aguilera was active during the Revolution and a member of the Malolos Congress. To discourage Lipenos from aiding General Malvar during the Philippine- American War, Americans imprisoned Gregorio and around seven hundred townsfolk, accusing them of hiding fifty rifles, a ploy for justifying arbitrary arrest. Wealthy men were forced by the Americans to work in the streets to humiliate them. Those who owned summerhouses in Balete were each given a can of kerosene, forced to march the ten kilometer distance to the barrio, and ordered to set fire to their own houses! Prisoners were only released after they surrendered fifty rifles, which their families had to buy in the black market. Gregorio Aguilera Solis (president municipal, 1902-1903 and Batangas governor, 1904-1907), married his first cousin Rosenda Solis Katigbak. They had no children.
    The Spanish mestizo Celestino Solis founded the Solis clan, the most aristocratic family in Lipa, if not the whole province. He was considered the richest man in Lipa in his time (gobernadorcillo, 1843, 1848 , 1860-1861). He has been married thrice, first to Patricia Metra (old spelling of Mitra), then to her sister Jacoba. The name of his third wife is not known. Patricia’s eldest daughter, Justa, married Norberto Catigbac. Their daughter was Segunda, with whom Jose Rizal was romantically linked. Another daughter, Maria, married Gregorio Aguilera. Jacoba had several daughters, Maria, married Gregorio Aguilera. Jacoba had several daughters: Salvador, Germana, Catalina, Marcelina, Filomena, and one son, Bernardo. Both Celestino and his son’s children are mostly girls, so the Solis Family name is almost extinct in Lipa today.
    Salvadora married Toribio Catigbac, the coffee king of Lipa. She loved diamonds and was one of the few women in Lipa whose slippers were encrusted with precious gems. For grand bailes, very fine, long golden pins with dangling, diamond-studded pendants decorated the embroidered pina sleeves of her traje de mestiza blouse, turning her every movement into a shimmering display as she danced her way around the ballroom floor! Even her fan was studded with diamonds to catch and throw back sparkling light with every movement of her hand.
    Germana married Dr. Jose Lozada (governor, 1907-1908), one of Lipa’s first doctors. His profession assured him of wealth and privilege. Their house in Lipa was famous for its stairway with gilt bronze balusters. When the Luna brothers came to Lipa in the 1890s to solicit contributions for the nationalist cause, the Lozada couple housed them in a nipa-shingled guesthouse set in an orchard at the back of the main house. The walls were of woven sawali and the floors of split bamboo, but the bahay kubo was luxuriously appointed with crystal chandeliers, gilded mirrors, Persian carpets, and blackamoors! The following day, the guests were awakened for breakfast by string orchestra! In gratitude for the financial contribution and hospitality, the Lunas gifted their hosts with a fine pair of large, gilded Satsuma vases, which still exist today. The Lozadas had only one child, Consuelo, who married Reynaldo Lardizabal, son of the first Filipino governor of Marinduque. Consuelo and Reynaldo had two sons, Reynaldo Jr. and Jose. Jose was active in performing arts. He was the artistic director of the Bayanihan Dance Troupe and was with the Cultural Center of the Philippines during the Marcos era.
    Catalina Solis married an Aguilera and owned the largest house in Lipa, with a vast dining room that could seat eighty guests! Dinners were always the talk of the town as the entire table service, including the plates and lechon-sized platters were of solid silver! The cutlery (like the birdcage for her pet canary) was said to have been made of solid gold. All her children died young so she bequeathed her mansion to the Church, to be used as a diocesan residence. The house was destroyed in the American bombing of Lipa.
    Marcelina married Juan Olaguivel, son of Nicolas Olaguivel, the richest merchant in the Cebu Parian in 1830s. Juan’s son, named Nicolas after his grandfather, married his first cousin, Salustia Africa Solis. After the coffee boom, he engaged in sugar farming with disastrous results.He bought machinery on borrowed money, but no one knew how to maintain the machines. Consequently, they were as good as junk and the cane harvest could not be processed. Aside from that, rinderpest killed practically all carabaos and cattle in the country, so the harvest could not be brought to other mills. To top it off, sugar prices collapsed with the discovery of beef sugar. Shortly before World War II, he engaged in abaca trading, buying hemp from Bicol and selling it to sinamay weavers and rope-makers of Batangas. But naval blockages from 1914 to 1918 prevented the export of abaca, resulting in a glut. Local prices plummeted.
    Faced with business reverses, Nicolas disposed of many of his wife’s treasured objects to save mortgaged lands. Jewels, rosaries, and missals made of precious materials were sold to pay off debts. In spite of everything, his wife remained the richest woman in Lipa. During the Commonwealth era, she was a member of Quezon’s kitchen cabinet.
    Their only son Heleno Olaquivel was an opera singer who performed in Rigoletto and other operas in pre-war Metropolitan Theater. He later became a secular priest. Heleno’s sister, Criselda, married Alberto Katigbak, whose mother, Conchita Luz, was the half sister of Manuel Luz, the husband of Segunda Katigbak. Alberto was a career diplomat. He was ambassador to the Vatican and protocol officer of Foreign Affairs. One of his sons is “shoesmith” Mario Katigbak, now the distributor of Bulgari in Manila. Gilda, his eldest daughter married Ramon Benedicto, nephew of Marcos sugar czar Roberto Benedicto.
    Celestino Solis’s only son, Bernardo Solis (gobernadorcillo, 1881-1882, 1894-1895), married Guillerma Africa. They maintained a European lifestyle and reportedly dined off golden plates and cutlery on special occasions. He insisted that all meals be served formally. Diners were serenaded by a pianist and a soprano in residence. Siesta followed lunch. All were lulled to sleep by a pianist who only stopped playing when his patrons fell asleep.
    In 1880, Bernardo went to see the Paris Exposition, for which the Eiffel tower was built. There, he went on a shopping spree, buying furniture, gilded mirrors, bronzes, statuary, porcelain, silver, and other luxury items. He even bought an entire mirrored wall of the Brazillian Pavilion on which the story of coffee was painted in reverse! They say he had to chater a ship to bring home all his purchases.
    In Paris, he told his wife to wear her biggest diamonds to the opera. They were so huge that they made her uncomfortable. Midway through the performance, she started removing them, one piece at a time, until all her jewels were resting on her lap.
    After returning to Lipa, while arranging their French purchases, Guillerma slipped on the highly polished floor. The next day, Bernardo ordered Persian carpets for the entire house, beginning from the bottom of the staircase to the bedrooms above!
    Bernardo and Guillerma’s children include Amanda, Salustia, Filomena, Rosario, Bernado Jr., and Jose. The eldest, Amada, married Herminio de Silva; she inherited her father’s gold set, which survived World War II. Salustia married her first cousin, Nicolas Solis Olaguivel. Dona Salustia’s hair was so long that it literally swept the floor. Everyday, after her morning bath, her tresses were spread out over the pasamano of her bedroom to dry. Inside her etui made of carved ivory was fitted a sewing kit – scissors, thimble, needle-case, and spools – all of solid gold. She wrote her letters with a golden feather flecked with diamonds. She was so sentimental that when her mother died, the only thing she wanted was her mother’s favorite pina handkerchief.
    Filomena married Catalino Dimayuga. Their son, Lauro Dimayuga, was entrusted as teenager to Jose Rizal who personally supervised his studies in Madrid. One of the indios bravos, Lauro was chosen to challenge to a duel Wenceslao Retano, who had written disparaging remarks against Filipinos. For this, Dimayuga earned the sobriquet “The Fearless Batangueno”. Active in the propaganda movement, he was twenty-two years old when he was arrested by the Spaniards upon discovery of the Katipunan. He was imprisoned in the Batangas provincial jail and subsequently executed without trial.
    Rosario, the youngest daughter, married Jose Lopez of Balayan. Bernardo Jr. married heiress Leandra Espinoza of Sariaya, Tayabas. As a custom, the wedding had to be held in the bride’s hometown. Sariaya was known for livestock and rustlers. In order to encourage the Lipenos to attend the festivities, the fiancee’s family said, “Come to Sariaya, and you will see our streets filled with carabaos.” To this, the Lipenos countered, “Come to Lipa, and you will see our streets paved with silver!” Bernardo Jr. contributed to the Lipa newspaper Columnas Volantes and to the leading Manila Spanish broadsheet, La Vanguardia. Bernardo Jr. and Leandra had three children, all named after their favorite operas by Wagner and St.Saens: Isolde, Samson, and Dalila.
    Samson wanted to become a Jesuit, but his mother refused to let him, which she later regretted. Drafted when the Japenese invaded, his mother asked Mrs. Quezon to have him recalled from Bataan, but Samson refused to leave his post. Brought up like a prince, he could not cope with the rigors of the battlefield and he perished in Bataan. Had he lived, he might have wedded his long-time sweetheart, Gliceria Dimaano Rustia, who eventually married Bienvenido Tantoco of Malolos, with whom she founded Rustan’s.
    Dalila married Dr. Cayetano Oca, brother of assassinated labor leader Roberto Oca. Their son, Brother Bernard Oca, F.S.C. is currently president of La Salle Greenhills.Bernardo and Guillerma’s youngest son, Jose, married Miguela Subol, daughter of one of their katiwalas.
    The large Katigbak clan is so prolific that their names have become synonymous with Lipa. Josef Catigbac (original spelling) (gobernadorcillo, 1827) married Andrea Calao. They had three sons: Cayetano, Norberto, and Leon.
    Cayetano was a mere mag-aaro or plowman but he was hardworking. He married Fausta Tapia who owned large tracts of undeveloped land, which were all cultivated by the time she died. They had three children: Toribio, Leoncia, and Maria. When Cayetano remarried, the children transferred their mother’s properties to their names.
    Toribio (president municipal, 1901-1902), said to be the richest person in town during the coffee boom, married Salvadora Solis. Of their four children, only Macaria Solis Katigbak had heirs. She married Perfecto Salas of Molo, Iloilo, a law partner of Rafael Palma. They had two sons and one daughter, Adela. Adela’s mother and brothers died during the liberation of Manila. Their estate was divided between her and a nephew. She was so rich that from just the proceeds of molasses – by-product of the sugar harvest – she could travel around the world annually.
    Josef Catigbac’s second son, Norberto (gobernadorcillo, 1862) married Justa Solis. Their eldest son, Mariano Solis Katigbak (gobernadorcillo, 1896-1897), was Jose Rizal’s classmate at Ateneo. He married Rosario Luz, half sister of Manuel Luz, his brother in law.
    Segunda Solis Katigbak was Jose Rizal’s first sweetheart and probably the best known of her clan. While studying at Colegio de la Concordia in Santa Ana, her classmate, Olimpia Rizal, invited her to party where she met Jose. Smitten, Rizal showered the fourteen-year-old lass with flowers, poems, and sketches. Hearing of his infatuation, Segunda’s disapproving parents hurriedly brought her back to Lipa, even tearing up her pencil portrait by Rizal. Subsequent letters from him were also destroyed. Aside from not being Lipeno, his parents were mere inquilinos or lessors in the Dominican Hacienda de Calamba. At sixteen, Segunda was married off to Manuel Luz, a wealthy planter and close relative. Rizal never forgot her, visiting Segunda several times in Lipa. He even played chess with her husband and, when he lost said, “I not only lost the game, but my heart, as well.”
    Leon Katigbak, Segunda’s half brother, had two children by Pacita Luz Roxas whose mother, Alejandra, was the eldest sister of Manuel Luz. Leon’s only daughter, Imelda Roxas Katigbak, married Aurelio Dayrit of San Fernando, Pampanga. One of their daughters, Carmen (Menchu), married a nephew of Senator Ambrosio Padilla. She headed the National Commission for Culture and the Arts under Presidents Aquinio and Ramos.
    Leon’s only son, Jose Roxas Katigbak, married Maria Kalaw, daughter of Teodoro M. Kalaw. They had four children:Marinella, Pinky, Purisima, and Norberto. Marinella married Armand Fabella of Pagsanjan whose family owns Jose Rizal College in Manila. He was Education secretary during the Ramos administration.
    Andrea and Josef’s third son was Lino Catigbac (gobernadorcillo, 1869-1870) who married thrice.
    The propertied and cultured Luzes lived quietly and maintained a low profile. The family produced painters, sculptors, musicians, scholars, and writers in every generation. They were descended from Jose de San Miguel Luz and Gertrudes Metra, probably the sister-in-law of Celestino Solis. Jose Luz (gobernadorcillo, 1854,1866) was a Tagalog poet and prominent planter. Their sons were Simeon and Manuel.
    Simeon (gobernadorcillo, 1879-1880; first elected governor, 1903-1904) had two daughters, Maria and Teofila, who married Norberto Jr. and Jose Katigbak respectively. Their husbands were the brothers of Segunda, their aunt-in-law. Maria and Teofila’s uncle, Manuel, married Segunda Katigbak, and had nine children by her. Every evening, after dinner, the whole family would gather in the sala for a concert with everyone singing or performing on a different instrument. Among the nine children were Arsenio, Paz, Justa, and Valeriano. Arsenio Luz was a businessman and writer. He wrote for El Renacimiento and was managing editor of Philippines Herald in 1922; managed the first sweepstakes in 1933; and became the first Filipino president of the Rotary Club. He married his cousin, Amparo Katigbak. Their daughter, Amparito, married Serafin Cui of Cebu. Amparito’s son, Serafin Cui Jr., was city administrator of Manila under the Bagatsing administration.
    Paz Katigbak Luz was married young to Pablo Dimayuga, the first pharmacist in Lipa. After her husband’s death, Paz was taken back by her mother Segunda, who housed her and her children in the old house. It is one of only five colonial period houses left in Lipa today.
    Justa Katigbak Luz married another cousin, Dr. Isabelo Katigbak, one of the first Lipenos to graduate from the U.P. School of Medicine. Isabelo’s practice was so successful that his best friend, another doctor, murdered him in a fit of professional jealousy and subsequently committed suicide after arrest. Justa’s granddaughter of the same name married a Tantoco of Malolos. She was with the office of former first Lady Loi Ejercito.
    Valeriano Katigbak Luz married Rosario Dimayuga, one of the first female architects in the country. She was the doyenne of Philippine interior designers and did many beautiful houses before and after World War II. Valeriano’s children included Vicenta, Alfredo, and Arturo. Vicenta married Carlos Cosculluela of Negros; their son, Ricardo, married the daughter of Imelda Marcos’s close friend, jeweler Liding Oledan; Rafael became Negros Occidental governor in1998. Valeriano’s eldest son, architect Alfredo, trained under Frank Lloyd Wright and was close to John D. Rockefeller; he designed the regional World Health Organization (WHO) building, the Magsaysay Center, and the Los Banos International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) complex. Arturo Luz, National Artist and gallery owner, married Tessie Ojeda; one of their daughters, Paola, was a well-known pop singer who died quite young from cancer.
    The Kalaw, Malabanan, Mayo, and Roxas clans were not flamboyantly wealthy, but they possessed brains.
    The Kalaws are descended from Luis Calao (Spanish era spelling) (gobernadorcillo, 1821), who married YLdefonsa Aguila. Their youngest daughter, Andrea, married Josef Catigbac.Luis and Yldefonsa’s son, Ramon, married Romana Inciong; their son Valerio Kalaw was the last capitan municiapal (1897-1898) under Spain and the first president municipal in 1903 under the U.S.
    Valerio’s eldest son was Teodoro, a brilliant lawyer and editor of El Renacimiento, a newpaper famous for featuring U.S. abuses. Dean Worcester filed a libel suit against them, which he won. The paper folded. Teodoro M. Kalaw was assemblyman (1909-1912) and director of the National Library until his death. He married the Ilongga Pura Villanueva, the first Manila Carnival Queen of 1908. Their children are Maria, Purita, Evelina, and Teodoro Jr.
    Maria, Miss Philippines in 1931 and a senator (1962-1967), married Jose Roxas Katigbak. Purita married Rafael Ledesma of Negros Occidental; their daughters were Rita, Consuelo, Ada, and Lourdes. The latter is single Rita, who headed the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, and is married to Jaime Gonzalez of Pampanga. Consuelo, a former nun, after obtaining Vatican dispensation married Luis Jalandoni, former priest and spokesman of the Netherlands-based National Democratic Front. Ada married ambassador to the United Nations, Philip Mabilangan, son of Ambassador Felipe Mabilangan of Santo Tomas. Philip’s sister Maria Luisa, an aide of U.S. president Bill Clinton, married a Haley of Little Rock, Arkansas.
    Evelina Kalaw married Ramon Katigbak, brother of Ambassador Alberto Katigbak. Their son, Ramon Jr., was a technocrat during the Marcos administration and a member of the president’s Economic Staff. Teodoro Kalaw, Jr. married Eva Estrada of Tarlac, who was a senator in the 1960s. Their daughter, Chingbee, formerly married to Ricardo Manotoc, Jr. is now married to Roberto Cuenca, whose family was originally from Cuenca, Batangas.
    Valerio Kalaw’s eldest daughter, Rosario, married Manuel Luz Roxas, nephew of Manuel Luz who was the husband of Segunda Katigbak.
    Valerio’s second son, Maximo Kalaw, was a prolific writer and private secretary to Manuel L. Quezon when he was the resident commissioner in Washington. Maximo took up law and was the first Filipino to get a doctorate in Political Science. During the Commonwealth, he was elected to the Philippine Assembly and served two terms. Daughter Erlinda was a pre-war Miss Philippines. She married Potenciano Ilusorio, a businessman from Bulacan.
    He was one of President Marcos’s closest cronies and said to have introduced Dovie Beams to him. Among the Illusorio chidren are Sylvia, now married to the son of taipan Emilio Yap, and Honey; whose teleserye squabbles over the family fortune have been well-covered by the press.
    The Roxas clan is descended from Capitan Sixto Roxas (gobernadorcillo, 1867-1868; president municipal, 1903-1904). He married Alejandra Luz, the eldest sister of Manuel. Their daughter, Pacita Luz Roxas, married Leon Katigbak, the half brother of Segunda Katigbak. Sixto’s granddaughter, Felicia, married Arturo Tanco from San Isidro, Nueva Ecija who was the head of National Rice Corporation (NARIC). Tanco’s eldest son is technocrat Arturo Tanco, Jr. who was President Marco’s Agriculture secretary.
    Financier Sixto Roxas Jr. was one of the founders of Bancom Development Corporation. He married the daughter of World War II heroine Josefa Llanes Escoda, Teresa “Bing” Escoda, who headed the Cultural Center of the Philippines under Presidents Aquino and Ramos.
    The Mayos, according to family tradition, are descended from Captain Ferdinand Mayo, an Irish ship captain who was shipwrecked off Balayan with his female Chinese cook named Pan To Ja. He eventually married her and had four sons. Cipriano Mayo married Ignacia Metra. Could Ignacia have been a sister of Gertrudes who married into the Luz clan, and of Jocoba and Patricia who both married into the Solis clan? Cipriano and Ignacia had two sons, Petronilo (Cabesang Petron,gobernadorcillo, 1883-1884) and Eduardo (gobernadorcillo, 1889-1890).
    Eduardo’s eldest daughter, Rufina, was the first wife of Pablo Borbon of Batangas City. Like Salvadora Solis Catigbac, she also used to pin jeweled pendants to the sleeves of her barong nipis for gran bailes.Eduardo’s other daughter, Micaela, married Claro Recto of Rosario. Their son was nationalist statesman Claro M. Recto. Eduardo’s grandon, Esteban Mayo, was mayor of Lipa (1913-1934, 1941, 1946-1947), and the first city mayor (1947-1952). Esteban’s son, Vicente, was governor (1988-1995).

    Padre Garcia

    The Rectos came from the old town of Rosario, which originally stood on the site of Padre Garcia today, descended from Josef Recto who married Isabel de la Cruz. Their son, Claro, first married Hilariona Gonzalez and then Micaela Mayo of Lipa. The latter’s son was Claro M. Recto who was secretary to Vicente Ilustre of the Philippine Commission in 1913, 1928, senator (1931, 1941,1949 and 1955, president of the 1935 Constitutional Convention, and justice of the Supreme Court. Don Claro first married Angelina Sales and then Aurora Reyes.
    Daughter Chona Recto was considered one of the most elegant and beautiful women. She first married Johnny Ysmael, heir to the Magdalena Estate that is now New Manila. She was widowed, and then married Hans Kasten, who sired Hans Jr. She had four Ysmael children. Her eldest daughter, Techie Ysmael, married the only son of Manila mayor Arsenio Lacson, and then married sportsman Mike Bilbao. Chona’s son, Louie Ysmael, is Manila’s disco club and hangout bar Don Claro’s other daughter, Maria Cristina, married a Garchitorena from Tigaon, Camarines Sur. Their daughter, Leni Garchitorena, died in a hit-and-run accident in the 1950’s, which made headlines as “The Ghost of Balete Drive”.
    Don Claro’s son by his second wife was Rafael Recto, a prominent lawyer. His son, Ralph, has been Batangas Congressman since 1992, Senator until 2004, and is married to movie actress Vilma Santos, who is now Batangas Governor. Ralph’s sister, Plinky, is a popular TV announcer. Younger Brother, Ricardo, was the vice governor of Batangas until 2004.

    San Juan de Bolbok

    The Moxicas had a lot of lands and properties, said to have come from Fray Damaso Moxica, the friar who built the town church. He was not related to Rogelio Moxica, the husband of Cavitena Eulalia de la Cruz, whose three daughters inherited the frias properties. One of them, Gregoria Moxica, married Vicente Quizon of Lipa; their daughter, Dorotea, married Jose Trivino Mercado, a first cousin of Jose rizal. Bishop Quizon, Taal parish priest and auxiliary bishop of Lipa Diocese, is one of the descendants.
    The Perezes were originally from Ibaan. Camilo Perez married Petra Trivino from San Juan. He transferred the town to its present site, and became Ibaan’s gobernadorcillo. His son, Andres, married Monica Trivino; their son, Florencio, was president municipal in 1913.
    The Marasigan, Mercado, Salud, and de Villa families are also dayo, or newcomers, who married into the town’s original families.
    The Marasigans came from Cuenca, Batangas. Francisco Marasigan (first capitan municipal under the Maura Law, 1894), married Irene Perez Mercado, granddaughter of Camilo Perez. Their son, Benito, was renowned gamester. Benito’s grandson, Octavio Jr., continues the family tradition in Saipan and Palau. Benito married Soledad Villapando of Lipa. Among his children were Francisco, Apolonio, and Horacio. Lawyer Francisco married Narisa Limjap Ubaldo. Apolonio (congressman, 1965) married his first cousin, Arceli Marasigan Lecaroz of Marinduque. Horacio married Angeles Mercado daughter of Kapitan Leon. Horacio was named “Man of the Year” in 1978 by the Manila Bulletin for fighting the establishment of a copper-smelting plant in San Juan. He headed the Landowners’ Association of the Philippines and fought against land reform.
    Francisco Marasigan’s sisters, Pantaleona and Dolores Marasigan, settled in San Pablo. Pantaleona married twice, first to Vicente Marino and then to Severino Dichoso. By Marino, she had her only son, Florentino, who married an Angeles of SanPablo. Their son is stage actor Tony Marino who performed the leading role in “The King and I in Sydney, Australia. By Dichoso, Pantaleona had her only daughter, Consorcia, who married Claro Alcantara. Their two daughters were Asunsion and Caridad. Asuncion married Zacarias Ticzon and Caridad married a de Gorostiza from San Pablo.
    Francisco Marasigan’s other sister, Dolores, married Placido Escudero, originally from Galicia, Spain who later settled in Santa Cruz, Laguna. Their only son, Arsenio, enlarged the Escudero estate in San Pablo and developed Villa Escudero, with its large collection of antiques and memorabilia. Arsenio’s grandson, Don Escudero, is a noted movie set designer and director.
    The Mercados, originally from Binan, Laguna descended from Juan Mercado who had thirteen children. One of them, Francisco, changed his surname to Rizal to avoid being implicated in the 1872 Cavite Mutiny, as his son, Paciano, was a student of Fr. Burgos. Spanish harassment forced Francisco’s brother to move. One of them, Gregorio, ended up in San Juan and married Eulalia M. Trivino; their son, Jose, married Dorotea Moxica Quizon. Jose and Dorotea’s son, Leon Mercado, studied in Letran and was fluent in Latin and Greek. He joined the Revolution at seventeen and was known as Kapitan Leon. He had twelve children including Dominador Mercado who developed Corinthian Gardens and Tahanan Village, and Leon Antonio Mercado, architect of Legaspi Towers.
    Leon’s only sister, Maria Mercado, married Santos Luz Lopez of Lipa. Their daughter, Soledad, married her first cousin, Eusebio Lopez, a 1935 Constitutional Convention delegate and judge of the People’s Court that acquitted President Laurel, Madrigal, et al. of collaboration.
    The Saluds, like the Marasigans, came from Cuenca. They intermarried with the de Villas, originally from San Jose, Batangas. Felipe Salud, the first Salud in San Juan, married Lucia de Villa in the late 1840s. Their son, Fidel, married Luciana Perez, daughter of Camilo. Jose de Villa, the first de Villa in San Juan, came from San Jose. He married Josefa Ylao, a native of San Juan. A descendant of theirs, Esteban de Villa, was gobernadorcillo (1892-1894) and president municipal (1900-1905, 1916-1919). His granddaughter, Thelma de Villa, married Dr. Federico Leelin whose family is from Camirines Sur and owns Goldilocks food chain. Most of San Juan’s early mayors were de Villas. Braulio de Villa was provincial governor (1919-1922). General Renato de Villa was President Ramos’s chief of staff and a presidential aspirant.
    The Trivinos are one of San Juan’s oldest families. Their ancestor, Juan Tribino, married Gregoria. His sister, Monica, married Camilo Perez whose son, Andres, married his first cousin, Celestina Trivino, Juan’s daughter. A descendant of Juan with the same name emigrated to Naga City after World War II and became Camarines Sur governor.

    San Jose

    The Aguilas are probably descendants of Don Juan de la Aguila of Lipa who, according to Fray San Antonio in 1665, planted in Lipa the first cacao plant brought in from Mexico. The Aguilas of San Jose trace their ancestry to Francisco, Felipe, and Agustin Aguila, gobernadorcillos in 1781,1783, and 1786 repectively. Their descendants also became gobernadorcillo: Apolinario (1816) and Hilario (1826,1835, 1842, and 1843).
    Another descendant, Andres, married Agustina de la Cruz. Their son, Felizardo, married Toribia matibag. Three of their sons became gobernadorcillos: Camilo (1869-1870), Buenaventura (1890-1891), and Salvador (1892-1894).
    Salvador Aguila married Alejandra Masilungan. Their son Paterno (mayor, 1917-1918) married Petra de Jesus; their daughter, Candelaria, married Leonarda Ona.
    Salvador’s sister, Agustina, married Briccio Makalintal. Their son, Ambrocio, was presedente municipal (1897-1898, 1901-1902). Ambrocio’s son, Querbe Makalintal, was a Marcos chief justice and Bataan Speaker.
    Some divide the Aguilas, in jest, into two clans; Aguilang itim (black) and Aguilang puti (white). This, it was said, was to differentiate darker skinned indios from lighter skinned mestizos de sangley. Pedro Reyes Aguila, a puti, married Paula Andal. Their daughter, Dr. Concepcion Aguila, was a noted civic leader and Centro Escolar University co- founder. Owners of Aguila Glass Corporation belong to puti clan. The de Villas came from Miguel de Villa who married Angela Bautista in 1785. Their daughter, Catalina, married Anacleto de los Santos, son of the founder of the Ona clan. The Onas are descended from Miguel de los Santos who married Josefa Carandang. They has a son, Anacleto, who married Catalina de Villa in 1809. Anacleto’s son, Ramon, chose Ona when Governor General Claveria decreed that all people with the surnames de la Cruz, de los Reyes, and de los Santos must change their family names. Ramon (gobernadorcillo, 1861) married Cecilia Dia. Their children were Ambrocio and Buena. Buena married Rafael de Luna.
    Ambrocio Ona married Maria Luna. Their grandson, Leonardo (mayor, 1964-1968) married Candelaria Aguila. Leonardo’s son, Juan, was consul general in Toronto and Sydney. He also opened embassies in Teheran and Moscow.
    The de Lunas, originally from Bauan, are descended from Esteban de la Cruz who changed his name to de Luna in compliance with the Claveria decree. Esteban was probably the brother of Benedicto Luna, because his eldest son Rafael claimed to be the first cousin of Don Remigio Luna of Batangas City. Esteban’s children, Rafael,Vicente and Geronimo settled in San Jose after the first two married women from there and the latter, a secular priest, became co-adjutor of the parish priest.
    Rafael de Luna (president municipal, 1899) married Buena Ona. Their sons both became town mayors, Daniel (1925-1927) and Vitaliano, a doctor (1919-1921, 1938-1940).
    Vicente Luna married Arcadia Quizon. They had two sons, Luis and Victoriano. Luis was active in the Revolution. He was also Miguel Malvar’s secretary during the Philippine-American War. Luis was one of the founders of Batangas Tranportation Company in 1918.Victoriano became surgeon general of the Philippine army; the Victoriano Luna Hospital is named after him. His daughter, Luz married Dr. Andres Angara; their daughter, Lourdes Angara, married Aquino Health secretary Alfredo Bengzon.

    Ibaan

    The Karingals are descended from Roman Karingal who by the 1850’s had acquired land and built a bahay na bato, which still stands today. His descendants do not remember how he made his fortune, but it was substantial enough for him to annually clean and dry the coins in his azotea. Unfortunately, he also gambled and by the time he died, his fortune was greatly reduced.
    His only daughter, Victorina, married Damaso Bago who was related to the Roxases of Lipa. Damaso had an only son, Francisco, who was raised by Capitan Sixto Roxas after Damaso and Victoriana died. Francisco’s daughter, Maria, married a Lim. The Lim children all become doctors. Maria’s only daughter, Cecili Lim, married Dr. Manuel Cayetano of Pateros, Rizal, brother of Senator Rene Cayetano.

    Bauan

    Dona Ramona Aguilera, mother in law of Vicente Agregado is a lawyer in Batangas City. (May 1993: 193)
    Father Andres de Castro mentions that the Pagdonsolan clan was the most prominent family in Bauan in 1790. Descendants of that family no longer remember their ancestors, but tile-roofed kamaligs lining the beach attest to the industry of their ancestors, who used to ship cloth, livestock, poultry, and even eggs in Manila, bringing back cigarettes, matches, salt, and other merchandise from the capital.
    The Brual family stems from Brigido Brual who married Sergia Buendia. Brigido was a trader in cloth, buying hand-woven textiles from Tanauan (part now of Mabini) and bringing it to Mindoro and neighboring islands. On his return voyage, he was loaded with bakawan, the preferred firewood.
    Brigido sired Justino, Sebastian, Clemente, and Bernabe. Brigido was successful enough to consider sending Justino to Spain after he was expelled from Ateneo for skipping classes.Sebatian became the first doctor of Bauan. Bernabe became the first Filipino parist priest of the town. Clemente became the town’s first pharmacist. He married Simona Pagdonsolan. Their daughter, Teofila, married Simeon Ylagan who became mayor.
    Portrait of Doña Gliceria Marella Villavicencio by Juan Luna was unveiled by Mrs. Trinidad de Leon Roxas at the Luna Centennial Exhibition on December 9, 1957.

    TAAL

    Taal in the early 1800’s was a weaving town as the principal crop was a cotton which was then made into cloth. However, increasing demand for sugar led to more lands being planted to sugar cane. By mid-century Batangas sugar came to be known in the world as Taal sugar. The town became the second most populous town in the country next to Manila. It became so prosperous that it was able to initiate and complete the grandiose scheme of building the largest church in the country and in Asia.
    Taal’s most prominent family is descended from Sebastian Marella who was said to have been the richest man in Batangas in his time. He owned vast haciendas and had ships as well. His granddaughter Gliceria was orphaned early and grew up with her grandfather in the largest house in Taal (now Rizal Foundation Colleges). In 1872, she married her uncle, shipowner Eulalio Villavicencio. His wedding gift to her was a house that still stands today. An astute business, Gliceria managed their combined properties while her husband managed their ships.
    Sugar exports were increasing by leaps and bounds due to the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. Taal was in its heyday. After the milling season, when all the sugar had been delivered to Manila and the crop loans and cash advances had been deducted, boats brought back the net proceeds to Taal. Ships would dock in Lemery and bags of money in coin were unloaded and brought by porters to the main Villavicencio house in Ilaya, which had a commanding view of the sea. There the sala was emptied of furniture, a large mat was spread on the floor, and the contents of the bags were poured out in the center of the room. The family then sat on the floor and began counting the coins. The process took days and even visitors joined in the counting and gossiping. The money was then stored in large balayong chests with wrought iron locks. A devout woman, Doña Gliceria donated the solid gold vestments of the Virgin of Caysasay, Taal’s miraculous patroness. Shortly after the vestments had been completed, tulisanes raided the house in the middle of the night. When asked about the contents of a chest, which contained the gold vestments and a lot of money, Doña Gliceria quickly answered that it was empty. The robbers, not believing her, opened the chest and saw that it did indeed look empty – a miracle attributed to Our Lady of Caysasay. The Villavicencio donated P18,000 ­(equivalent to about P6.5 million today, based on the price of palay then which was P1.25 per cavan) to Jose Rizal in January of 1892 for the nationalist cause. In appreciation, Juan Luna gifted the couple with their portraits (now in the Locsin collection) with gilded frames by Isabelo Tampinco. Eulalio Villavicencio was arrested together with Pablo Ocampo and Dr. Ariston Bautista upon the discovery of the Katipunan. Imprisoned at Fort Santiago, he was released in 1898 and died three months later due to hardships suffered during incarceration.
    Her husband’s death made Gliceria even more determined. She donated a ship, the SS Bulosan, to the revolutionary government. It became the first ship of the Philippine Navy. She supplied the insurrectors, sometimes even personally driving the cart carrying guns and ammunition concealed under sacks of corn.
    The wealth of Doña Gliceria was legendary. She owned large estates in seven towns and had many jewels. Once, so ill that everyone thought she was dying, her maestro carpintero sadly approached her daughter, Vicenta. Doña Gliceria had instructed him that, in the event of her death, he was to tell Vicenta that a garapon of loose diamonds was hidden in the aljibe or cistern.
    Gliceria’s eldest son, Sixto, is the grandfather of Vic-Vic Villavicencio of the Triple-V restaurant chain. Her eldest daughter married Gregorio Agoncillo, nephew of Felipe Agoncillo. Another daughter, Vicenta, married her first cousin, Juan Jerry Joven of Bacoor, Pampanga. Raquel Villavicencio, one of the country’s top screenwriters and movie directors, is one of Gliceria’s descendants.
    The Ilagans, descended from Pedro Ylagan (the family name was spelled with a Y during the Spanish era), were also involved in sugar and shipping. With estates in Taal, Lemery, Calaca, Balayan, and Tuy, Pedro’s son, Ignacio (capitan municipal of Taal, 1892-1894), maintained a large house in each of those towns. Every house was fully staffed and had to be ready for his unexpected arrival.
    Ignacio’s son, Tiburcio, was a profligate host: anything admired by a guest was presented as a gift. Tiburcio’s son, was a colourful character who roared through town in his Cadilla and more often on his huge motorcycle. He was appointed mayor by President Roxas and stayed on for eleven years, winning elections without campaigning. His wife eventually became vice mayor.
    The Agoncillos are descended from Ramon Agoncillo and Gregoria Encarnacion. Gregoria died giving birth to Felipe who was raised by her sister, Ygnacia Encarnacion Ilustre, mother of Vicente Ilustre of Lemery. Felipe Agoncillo, like his cousin Vicente, became a lawyer. Upon the discovery of the Katipunan in 1896, Felipe narrowly escaped arrest, sailing on the first boat out of Manila. He travelled toYokohama and then Hong Kong where he stayed in exile for ten years. He organized and became the first president of the Philippine Revolutionary Committee.
    His wife, Marcela Mariño, and daughter, Lorenza, joined him in exile. Together with Delfina Herbosa, niece of Jose Rizal, the women sewed the first Philippine flag in 1898. Felipe Agoncillo was the Malolos Republic ambassador to Washington. He took the bar exam in 1905 to practice law under U.S regime and scored one hundred percent in all subjects. He was elected to the first Philippine Assembly in 1907, defeating his cousin Vicente Ilustre. Felipe was the defense lawyer in the El Renacimiento case. In 1917, he became the Interior secretary under Governor General Wood.
    Gregoria Agoncillo, son of Felipe’s eldest brother Flaviano, married Mariaquita Villavicencio. Gregorio was conservative and segurista, refusing to invest his wife’s potion of the Villavicencio estate in a speculative sugar venture proposed by Vicente Ilustre. Eventually, he purchased the Ilustre properties for a song, after the banks had foreclosed on them and auctioned them off in the 1920s sugar debacle. As a result, Don Gregorio’s only daughter, Corazon Agoncillo, was the richest woman in Taal till the day she died.
    In the 1920s, he transformed the nipa-thatched house where he was born into the Agoncillo mansion that we see today. He also constructed the Agoncillo building on Taft Avenue.
    Atanasia Aniversario or Kabesang Tana, had one on the largest fortunes in Taal. She was also called Tanang Bangkong (bamboo dipper) because, among her many enterprises, she had a monopoly in the manufacturing of this item.
    Her only child, Matilde Martinez, who married Leon Apacible, inherited a great fortune. The Apacibles and the Ilagans were the only two Taal families who annually gave their old coins (hilis kalamay) a wash, leaving them to dry on mats spread out on their azoteas!
    Leon invested in shipping and had several steamers plying the Manila-Batangas route. He was appointed Taal’s juez de la paz in the last years of the Spanish period. In 1901, he was mysteriously lost at sea. His only son, Leon Jr., married Consolacion Noble, second cousin of Anita Noble. Leon Jr.’s only daughter, Corazon, became mayor of Taal (1975-1980, 1986-1988) and married Rafael Cañiza, the nephew of Senator Ambrosio Padilla who married Taaleña Lily de las Alas.
    Corazon Apacible Cañiza, former mayor of Taal Leon Apacible’s widow, Matilde Martinez, later married a younger man named Vicente Noble who was the son of her encargado or estate manager. Vicente and Matilde were childless. Vicente used to say he brought only his calzoncilloc into the May-December marriage, which, nevertheless, had happy results. Hard-working Vicente, using his wife’s capital, engaged in rice and sugar trading and made a fortune.
    Later, he ventured into politics and founded Partido Noble, which opposed the Patido Ilaya of the Ilustres and the Cabreras. He was appointed Batangas governor in 1930. He ran for the same position in 1934 and again in 1937 and won both times.
    Nobles are famous for their beauty. Vicente’s neice, Anita, was Miss Philippines of 1926. She married Juan Nakpil, National Artist for architecture and son of Julio Nakpil, composer of the first National Anthem, and Andres Bonifacio’s widow, Gregoria de Jesus. Their daughter, Edith Nakpil, married Francisco Rabat who was the Davao Oriental governor in the 1970s. Their other daughter, Anita, married Renato Tañada, the son of Senator Lorenzo Tañada.
    The de las Alas family, simply called Alas by Taaleños, was prominent in this century because of Antonio de las Alas (pensionado to Yale University, cum laude Master of Laws) who was chief of the Malacañang Executive Bureau under Governor General Harrison in 1919. In 1920, he was with the Interior Department and became a member of Congress in 1922. He became secretary of Public Works, 1934 and Finance, 1936. He was senator (1941-1947) and delegate to the 1971 Constitutional Convention. He married Natividad Lontok of Taal Lipa. Their daughter, Lily de las Alas, married Senator Ambrosio Padilla. The Padilla’s eldest daughter, Josie, married owner Ernest Rufino, originally of Batangas City. Another Padilla daughter, Menchu, married Raul Concepcion of the Concepcion Group of Companies, from Pasig.
    Vicente Lontok, originally of Taal, settled in Lipa and had two daughters and a son. The eldest daughter, Lilia, married Mariano Katigbak’s grandson, Artemio. They had four daughters. Their youngest daughter, Elizabeth (vice mayor of Lipa, 1993) married Juan Lozano, son of impresario. Their eldest daughter, Violeta, married Francisco Gancayco of Quezon whose family owns San Miguel Island off Tabaco, Albay. Another daughter , Ludivina, married Masbate governor Moises Espinosa who was later assassinated. Still another daughter, Emily, married Ramon Jison of Silay, Negros Occidental.
    The Orosas descended from Simplicio Agoncillo Orosa, captain of SS Bulosan. He was married to Juliana Ilagan. As delegate to Paris, Simplicio attempted to gain international recognition for the Philippine Republic.
    Simplicio’s eldest daughter, Maria Orosa, was a proponent of women’s emancipation. She wanted to study in America but her conservative father refused to send her abroad. She towed away on a ship bound for the U.S. When she was discovered, she washed dishes to pay for passage. She became a food chemist and was one of the country’s pioneers in nutrition.
    Simplicio’s son, Sixto Orosa, graduated salutatorian from the U.P. School of Medicine. He married Severina Luna of Batangas City. Dr. Orosa became known as the Father of Provincial Hospital Act. His son, Sixto Orosa, Jr., was the first president of Security Bank and also headed PCI Bank. Daughter Rosalinda is a noted performing arts critic. Another daughter, Leonor, is a National Artist for dance. She married Pampangueño Benjamin Goquingco, a chemical and electrical engineer. The youngest Orosa daughter, Helen, married chemist Luis del Rosario, Father of Philippine Laboratory Science and grandson of Anacleto del Rosario, a classmate of Jose Rizal.
    The Diokno family members are descendants of Angel Diokno who married Andrea Noblejas. Son Ananias was a revolutionary general. Anania’s son, Ramon, was a congressman (1916-1919, 1934-1935). Ramon’s son, Jose Wright Diokno, was a prominent lawyer who was a senator in the 1960s and imprisoned during Martial Law for his courageous opposition to Marcos.

    LEMERY

    The Ilustres are the most prominent of Lemery’s families. Ramon Ilustre and Ignacia Encarnacion were the parents of Vicente and Mariquita. Ignacia’s sister died giving birth to Felipe Agoncillo, and the Ilustres raised him. The uprightness and nationalism of Vicente and his cousin, Felipe, can be traced to their upbringing in the same household. Don Vicente was the basis for the character Isagani in Rizal’s novel El filibusterismo.
    Vicente Ilustre, a lawyer, was a member of the Philippine Commission (1913, 1916) for Mindanao and Sulu. When Don Vicente visited Jolo, the sultan offered Ilustre’s wife, Rita, jars full of beautiful natural Sulu pearls. Don Vicente forbade her to accept even a single pearl lest it be construed as a bribe.
    Vicente represented Batangas and Tayabas in the first Philippine Senate in 1916. During his term, Taal was the first town in Batangas to have running water and electricity. The entire populace would clap with delight when Don Vicente’s patriotism was evident in the Philippine flag done in stained glass on the comedor wall in his stately Arlegui mansion. But he did have a Japanese gardener to care for it.
    As owner of the two thousand hectare Hacienda Bayuyungan, now the town of Laurel below Tagaytay, he was a very rich man, and had exquisite and refined taste. The latest and choicest imported goods were brought to his house by La Estrella del Norte, Heacock’s, and other stores, for his approval. An artist in residence did table settings, decorated the altar for the annual Enthronement of the Sacred Heart in June, and created Fantastic belens with miniature waterfalls and bonsai trees for Christmas.
    The Ilustre summerhouse along Pansipit River in Lemery was a raised Carribean-style cottage. It had a fishpond surrounded by ceramic balustrades. The fishpond was connected to the river by a tunnel which kept the pond water fresh and allowed fish to enter but not to leave the pond. He and his friends would open the windows of the dining room, which overlooked the pond, put out fishing poles and relax on bentwood rocking chairs, and wait for the maliputo to bite while they enjoyed drinks and canapés. The moment a fish was caught, it was whisked off to the kitchen and immediately cooked.
    In preparation for an overnight visit of Governor General Harrison in 1910, the old Villavicencio house was completely renovated in Art Nouveau Style. Emilio Alvero, the foremost artist of his time, was commissioned to paint murals on walls, design and make new furniture and hand-painted draperies to decorate the sala for the occasion.
    Such extravagances came to an end in the 1920s. Don Vicente invested in sugar futures in the commodity exchange. He also persuaded his in-laws and their relatives, the Gocos and the Cabreras, to invest. However, world sugar prices collapsed and banks foreclosed on mortgaged lands and houses. Jewels and valuable, had to be sold and millions were lost.
    Vicente’s sister, Mariquita Ilustre, married Gervasio Ocampo of Quiapo, Manila. Their son, Vicente, founded Ocampo Hospital of Manila. Their daughter, Salud, married Iwahig Penal Colony Administrator Ramon Mitra, who sired Senator Ramon Mitra, Jr. Another daughter, Natividad, married Juan Arellano who designed the Post Office building and Metropolitan Theater in Manila. Their son, Oscar Arellano, was also a famous architect. Oscar’s grandson is movie star Gabby Concepcion.

    BALAYAN

    The Balayan Lopezes are descended from Narciso Lopez (teniente mayor, 1790 and mayor the same year upon the death of the incumbent). Son Silvino (gobenadorcillo, 1824, 1835) headed the Batangas chapter of Sociedad Economica de Amigos del Pais. Silvino’s son, Natalio, was also gobernadorcillo (1854, 1860). The family raised cattle but also experimented with cotton and, successfully, with sugar. They multiplied their fortune in shipping.
    Natalio’s eldest daughter, Cornelia, married Guillermo Toribio (gobernadorcillo, 1887-1889). Their daughter, Margarita, figured in an incident with the Balayan parish priest in 1892. While attending a barrio wedding, the Spanish priest gave her hand to kiss. She did not, so he slapped her but she managed to evade the blow. In turn, she slapped him with her fan and furiously fell on him until his habit was in tatters. History does not say what the priest did in revenge.
    Natalio’s sons were active in the Revolution. Mariano, the eldest, was appointed to the Malolos Congress but withdrew and counseled peace with Americans. Cipriano (presidente municipal, 1907-1909) was an officer in Aguinaldo’s army and headed Company One of the Makiling Batallion. Sixto, Natalio’s eldest son by his second wife, became secretary to the Agoncillo Commission and was sent to Washington, D.C. to seek recognition of the Philippine nation. Lorenzo was presidente municipal from 1899 to 1900. During the Philippine-American War, Lorenzo, Cipriano, and Manuel were arrested by the Americans and exiled to Tal

  72. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 21, 2010 at 11:27 am

    from “Batangas: Forged in Fire” edited by Ramon N. Villegas, Ayala Foundation [ section written by Martin I. Tinio Jr. ]:

    Taal in the early 1800’s was a weaving town as the principal crop was a cotton which was then made into cloth. However, increasing demand for sugar led to more lands being planted to sugar cane. By mid-century Batangas sugar came to be known in the world as Taal sugar. The town became the second most populous town in the country next to Manila. It became so prosperous that it was able to initiate and complete the grandiose scheme of building the largest church in the country and in Asia.
    Taal’s most prominent family is descended from Sebastian Marella who was said to have been the richest man in Batangas in his time. He owned vast haciendas and had ships as well. His granddaughter Gliceria was orphaned early and grew up with her grandfather in the largest house in Taal (now Rizal Foundation Colleges). In 1872, she married her uncle, shipowner Eulalio Villavicencio. His wedding gift to her was a house that still stands today. An astute business, Gliceria managed their combined properties while her husband managed their ships.
    Sugar exports were increasing by leaps and bounds due to the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. Taal was in its heyday. After the milling season, when all the sugar had been delivered to Manila and the crop loans and cash advances had been deducted, boats brought back the net proceeds to Taal. Ships would dock in Lemery and bags of money in coin were unloaded and brought by porters to the main Villavicencio house in Ilaya, which had a commanding view of the sea. There the sala was emptied of furniture, a large mat was spread on the floor, and the contents of the bags were poured out in the center of the room. The family then sat on the floor and began counting the coins. The process took days and even visitors joined in the counting and gossiping. The money was then stored in large balayong chests with wrought iron locks. A devout woman, Doña Gliceria donated the solid gold vestments of the Virgin of Caysasay, Taal’s miraculous patroness. Shortly after the vestments had been completed, tulisanes raided the house in the middle of the night. When asked about the contents of a chest, which contained the gold vestments and a lot of money, Doña Gliceria quickly answered that it was empty. The robbers, not believing her, opened the chest and saw that it did indeed look empty – a miracle attributed to Our Lady of Caysasay. The Villavicencio donated P18,000 ­(equivalent to about P6.5 million today, based on the price of palay then which was P1.25 per cavan) to Jose Rizal in January of 1892 for the nationalist cause. In appreciation, Juan Luna gifted the couple with their portraits (now in the Locsin collection) with gilded frames by Isabelo Tampinco. Eulalio Villavicencio was arrested together with Pablo Ocampo and Dr. Ariston Bautista upon the discovery of the Katipunan. Imprisoned at Fort Santiago, he was released in 1898 and died three months later due to hardships suffered during incarceration.
    Her husband’s death made Gliceria even more determined. She donated a ship, the SS Bulosan, to the revolutionary government. It became the first ship of the Philippine Navy. She supplied the insurrectors, sometimes even personally driving the cart carrying guns and ammunition concealed under sacks of corn.
    The wealth of Doña Gliceria was legendary. She owned large estates in seven towns and had many jewels. Once, so ill that everyone thought she was dying, her maestro carpintero sadly approached her daughter, Vicenta. Doña Gliceria had instructed him that, in the event of her death, he was to tell Vicenta that a garapon of loose diamonds was hidden in the aljibe or cistern.
    Gliceria’s eldest son, Sixto, is the grandfather of Vic-Vic Villavicencio of the Triple-V restaurant chain. Her eldest daughter married Gregorio Agoncillo, nephew of Felipe Agoncillo. Another daughter, Vicenta, married her first cousin, Juan Jerry Joven of Bacoor, Pampanga. Raquel Villavicencio, one of the country’s top screenwriters and movie directors, is one of Gliceria’s descendants.
    The Ilagans, descended from Pedro Ylagan (the family name was spelled with a Y during the Spanish era), were also involved in sugar and shipping. With estates in Taal, Lemery, Calaca, Balayan, and Tuy, Pedro’s son, Ignacio (capitan municipal of Taal, 1892-1894), maintained a large house in each of those towns. Every house was fully staffed and had to be ready for his unexpected arrival.
    Ignacio’s son, Tiburcio, was a profligate host: anything admired by a guest was presented as a gift. Tiburcio’s son, was a colourful character who roared through town in his Cadilla and more often on his huge motorcycle. He was appointed mayor by President Roxas and stayed on for eleven years, winning elections without campaigning. His wife eventually became vice mayor.
    The Agoncillos are descended from Ramon Agoncillo and Gregoria Encarnacion. Gregoria died giving birth to Felipe who was raised by her sister, Ygnacia Encarnacion Ilustre, mother of Vicente Ilustre of Lemery. Felipe Agoncillo, like his cousin Vicente, became a lawyer. Upon the discovery of the Katipunan in 1896, Felipe narrowly escaped arrest, sailing on the first boat out of Manila. He travelled to Yokohama and then Hong Kong where he stayed in exile for ten years. He organized and became the first president of the Philippine Revolutionary Committee.
    His wife, Marcela Mariño, and daughter, Lorenza, joined him in exile. Together with Delfina Herbosa, niece of Jose Rizal, the women sewed the first Philippine flag in 1898. Felipe Agoncillo was the Malolos Republic ambassador to Washington. He took the bar exam in 1905 to practice law under U.S regime and scored one hundred percent in all subjects. He was elected to the first Philippine Assembly in 1907, defeating his cousin Vicente Ilustre. Felipe was the defense lawyer in the El Renacimiento case. In 1917, he became the Interior secretary under Governor General Wood.
    Gregoria Agoncillo, son of Felipe’s eldest brother Flaviano, married Mariaquita Villavicencio. Gregorio was conservative and segurista, refusing to invest his wife’s potion of the Villavicencio estate in a speculative sugar venture proposed by Vicente Ilustre. Eventually, he purchased the Ilustre properties for a song, after the banks had foreclosed on them and auctioned them off in the 1920s sugar debacle. As a result, Don Gregorio’s only daughter, Corazon Agoncillo, was the richest woman in Taal till the day she died.
    In the 1920s, he transformed the nipa-thatched house where he was born into the Agoncillo mansion that we see today. He also constructed the Agoncillo building on Taft Avenue.
    Atanasia Aniversario or Kabesang Tana, had one on the largest fortunes in Taal. She was also called Tanang Bangkong (bamboo dipper) because, among her many enterprises, she had a monopoly in the manufacturing of this item.
    Her only child, Matilde Martinez, who married Leon Apacible, inherited a great fortune. The Apacibles and the Ilagans were the only two Taal families who annually gave their old coins (hilis kalamay) a wash, leaving them to dry on mats spread out on their azoteas!
    Leon invested in shipping and had several steamers plying the Manila-Batangas route. He was appointed Taal’s juez de la paz in the last years of the Spanish period. In 1901, he was mysteriously lost at sea. His only son, Leon Jr., married Consolacion Noble, second cousin of Anita Noble. Leon Jr.’s only daughter, Corazon, became mayor of Taal (1975-1980, 1986-1988) and married Rafael Cañiza, the nephew of Senator Ambrosio Padilla who married Taaleña Lily de las Alas.
    Corazon Apacible Cañiza, former mayor of Taal Leon Apacible’s widow, Matilde Martinez, later married a younger man named Vicente Noble who was the son of her encargado or estate manager. Vicente and Matilde were childless. Vicente used to say he brought only his calzoncilloc into the May-December marriage, which, nevertheless, had happy results. Hard-working Vicente, using his wife’s capital, engaged in rice and sugar trading and made a fortune.
    Later, he ventured into politics and founded Partido Noble, which opposed the Patido Ilaya of the Ilustres and the Cabreras. He was appointed Batangas governor in 1930. He ran for the same position in 1934 and again in 1937 and won both times.
    Nobles are famous for their beauty. Vicente’s neice, Anita, was Miss Philippines of 1926. She married Juan Nakpil, National Artist for architecture and son of Julio Nakpil, composer of the first National Anthem, and Andres Bonifacio’s widow, Gregoria de Jesus. Their daughter, Edith Nakpil, married Francisco Rabat who was the Davao Oriental governor in the 1970s. Their other daughter, Anita, married Renato Tañada, the son of Senator Lorenzo Tañada.
    The de las Alas family, simply called Alas by Taaleños, was prominent in this century because of Antonio de las Alas (pensionado to Yale University, cum laude Master of Laws) who was chief of the Malacañang Executive Bureau under Governor General Harrison in 1919. In 1920, he was with the Interior Department and became a member of Congress in 1922. He became secretary of Public Works, 1934 and Finance, 1936. He was senator (1941-1947) and delegate to the 1971 Constitutional Convention. He married Natividad Lontok of Taal Lipa. Their daughter, Lily de las Alas, married Senator Ambrosio Padilla. The Padilla’s eldest daughter, Josie, married owner Ernest Rufino, originally of Batangas City. Another Padilla daughter, Menchu, married Raul Concepcion of the Concepcion Group of Companies, from Pasig.
    Vicente Lontok, originally of Taal, settled in Lipa and had two daughters and a son. The eldest daughter, Lilia, married Mariano Katigbak’s grandson, Artemio. They had four daughters. Their youngest daughter, Elizabeth (vice mayor of Lipa, 1993) married Juan Lozano, son of impresario. Their eldest daughter, Violeta, married Francisco Gancayco of Quezon whose family owns San Miguel Island off Tabaco, Albay. Another daughter , Ludivina, married Masbate governor Moises Espinosa who was later assassinated. Still another daughter, Emily, married Ramon Jison of Silay, Negros Occidental.
    The Orosas descended from Simplicio Agoncillo Orosa, captain of SS Bulosan. He was married to Juliana Ilagan. As delegate to Paris, Simplicio attempted to gain international recognition for the Philippine Republic.
    Simplicio’s eldest daughter, Maria Orosa, was a proponent of women’s emancipation. She wanted to study in America but her conservative father refused to send her abroad. She towed away on a ship bound for the U.S. When she was discovered, she washed dishes to pay for passage. She became a food chemist and was one of the country’s pioneers in nutrition.
    Simplicio’s son, Sixto Orosa, graduated salutatorian from the U.P. School of Medicine. He married Severina Luna of Batangas City. Dr. Orosa became known as the Father of Provincial Hospital Act. His son, Sixto Orosa, Jr., was the first president of Security Bank and also headed PCI Bank. Daughter Rosalinda is a noted performing arts critic. Another daughter, Leonor, is a National Artist for dance. She married Pampangueño Benjamin Goquingco, a chemical and electrical engineer. The youngest Orosa daughter, Helen, married chemist Luis del Rosario, Father of Philippine Laboratory Science and grandson of Anacleto del Rosario, a classmate of Jose Rizal.
    The Diokno family members are descendants of Angel Diokno who married Andrea Noblejas. Son Ananias was a revolutionary general. Anania’s son, Ramon, was a congressman (1916-1919, 1934-1935). Ramon’s son, Jose Wright Diokno, was a prominent lawyer who was a senator in the 1960s and imprisoned during Martial Law for his courageous opposition to Marcos

  73. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 2, 2010 at 5:09 am

    Other families from Old Taal are the Noble, Lontok, Orosa, & Diokno families.


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