The Families of Old Binan, Laguna I

Gana old pix

They make an interesting study, the families of Old Binan, Laguna.  In most places, “old family” connotes an attenuated, if not completely dissipated, fortune.  True, the Old Binan families have had their economic vicissitudes like all the other old Filipino families, but as a whole, they are amazing because their old agricultural fortunes luckily, gradually, and smoothly transformed to urban real estate fortunes and other consistently lucrative holdings.  In other words, they are “still up there”… One actually wonders if the “feng shui” of Binan, for hundreds of years traditionally a Chinese enclave, has anything to do with it.

From the Spanish era all the way to the present, Binan, Laguna has always been the center of economic activity south of Manila.  It has only been in recent years that neighboring Santa Rosa, with all its fortuitous new developments, has come to challenge Binan’s long-held economic preeminence.

Old Binan, Laguna [ pronounced "Been-yang" by its natives ] resonated with the surnames of rich hacendero and merchant families like the Gana, Carillo-Trinidad, Alberto, Ocampo, Mercado, Yatco, Yaptinchay, Guico, Yapchulay, Lim-Aco, Lopez de Leon, Yap, Lim, Lao, Potenciano, Casas, Almeda, Gonzales, Cruz, Garcia, and Baylon.  And although the Binan dons and donas behaved oddly  towards the “principalia” families of neighboring Santa Rosa —  the Zavalla, Tiongco, and Perlas — the Binan and the Santa Rosa families eventually intermarried and became related.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sgItWo4wFo

As in other old Filipino towns, there were usually one or two core families from which the rest of the “principalia” families radiated.  In Old Binan, these were the Gana and the Carillo-Trinidad families, both of Chinese ancestry.

GANA.

The clan progenitor Vicente Tang-Gana [ o ca. 1770 ] married Gertrudes de los Reyes and they had one son, Gaspar Gana y de los Reyes.  Gaspar and _____ had six children:  Rufino, Gregorio, Francisca, Donata [ married _____ Carillo ], Macaria [ Alberto Yaptinchay y Carillo-Trinidad ], and Ceferina [ married Mariano Potenciano ].

After his wife Gertrudes passed away, Vicente Tang-Gana married for the second time to Tomasa _____.  They had four children:  Eulalio [ married Florentina Potenciano ], Jose [ married Regina Marabillas Custodio ], Petrona, and Roman.

Eulalio Gana y _____ married Florentina Potenciano and they had five children:  Eduardo [ married Filomena Ocampo ], Jesualdo [ married Crisanta Cruz then Petronila Carillo-Trinidad ], Flaviana [ married Mariano Lopez ], Ciriaco [ married Leonarda German, then Francisca German, and then Carmen Francisco ] and Teodora.

Eduardo Gana y Potenciano.

Filomena Ocampo de Gana.

Maria “Angge” Gana y Ocampo.

Vicente Gana y Ocampo.

Filomeno “Menong” Gana y Ocampo.

Jose Gana y ____ married Regina Marabillas Custodio and they had seven children:  Isabela, Maria, Jose, Miguel, Agustin, Mariano, and Rosa.

CARILLO-TRINIDAD.

There is an extant oil portrait of “Romana A. Carillo” [ Romana Asuncion de Carillo-Trinidad ] of Binan, Laguna by the 19th century master painter Justiniano Asuncion of Santa Cruz, Manila in the Leandro V. Locsin collection.  It shows a comely “morena” lady, dressed in a “traje de mestiza” [ the delicate fashion of the period:  embroidered "pina" top and a voluminous silk/satin skirt ], with a “Paphiopedilum” / “lady slipper” orchid in a pot.  It is mentioned in historical notes that the Asuncion of Santa Cruz, Manila were related to the Carillo-Trinidad of Binan, Laguna.

Romana was the ninth child of Antonio Asuncion y Molo and Remigia Santa Ana of Santa Cruz, Manila.  She was a favorite subject/model of her uncle “Capitan Ting,” the master portraitist Justiniano Asuncion y Molo [ o 1816 - + 1901 ].  Romana Asuncion y Santa Ana married Andres Carillo-Trinidad of Binan, Laguna and they had six children:  Petronila [ married Fermin Yatco y Yaptinchay ], Josefa [ married Engracio Quintos ], Joaquin, Angela [ married _____ Eugenio], Filomena [ married _____ Castrillo ], and Anicia [ married Hipolito Habacon ].

According to the Asuncion genealogy, Petronila Carillo-Trinidad y Asuncion and Fermin Yatco y Yaptinchay had nine children:  Macario, Mariano, Catalina, Gertrudes, Feliza, Jose, Basilisa, Belen and Epifania.

ALBERTO.

From Sir John Bowring’s “A Visit to the Philippine Islands,” 1856 [ Sir John Bowring was the British governor of Hong Kong ]:

“”The roads are generally good on the borders of the Laguna, and we reached Binan before sunset,the Indians having in the main street formed themselves in procession as we passed along.  Flags, branches of flowering forest trees, and other devices, were displayed.***First we passed between files of youths,then of maidens ; and through a triumphal arch we reached the handsome dwelling of a rich mestizo, whom we found decorated with a Spanish order, which had been granted to his father before him.  He spoke English, having been educated at Calcutta, and his house — a very large one — gave abundant evidence that he had not studied in vain the arts of domestic civilization.  The furniture, the beds, the tables, the cookery, were all in good taste, and the obvious sincerity of the kind reception added to its agreeableness.  Great crowds were gathered together in the square which fronts the house of DON JOSE ALBERTO.***

“Indians brought their game-cocks to be admired, but we did not encourage the display of their warlike virtues.  There was much firing of guns, and a pyrotechnic display when the sun had gone down, and a large fire balloon, bearing the inscription, “The people of Binan to their illustrious visitors,” was successfully inflated, and soaring aloft, was lost sight of in the distance, but was expected to tell the tale of our arrival to the Magidenne in Manila Bay. Binan is a place of some importance.  In it many rich mestizos and Indians dwell.  It has more than 10,000 inhabitants.  Large estates there are possessed by the Dominican friars, and the principal of them was among our earliest visitors.  There, as elsewhere, the principalia, having conducted us to our headquarters, came in a body to present their respects, the gobernadorcillo, who usually speaks Spanish, being the organ of the rest.  Inquiries about the locality, thanks for the honours done us, were the commonplaces of our intercourse, but the natives were always pleased when ” the strangers from afar” seemed to take an interest in their concerns.  Nowhere did we see any marks of poverty; nowhere was there any crowding, or rudeness, or annoyance, in any shape.  Actors and spectators seemed equally pleased; in fact, our presence only gave them another holiday, making but a small addition to their regular and appointed festivals.  Binan is divided by a river, and is about a mile from the Laguna.  Its streets are of considerable width, and the neighbouring roads excellent.  Generally the houses have gardens attached to them; some on a large scale.  They are abundant in fruits of great variety.  Rice is largely cultivated, as the river with its confluents affords ample means of irrigation.  The lands are usually rented from the Dominicans, and the large extent of some of the properties assists economical cultivation.  Until the lands are brought into productiveness, little rent is demanded, and when they become productive the friars have the reputation of being liberal landlords and allowing their tenants to reap large profits.  It is said they are satisfied with one-tenth of the gross produce.  A tenant is seldom disturbed in possession if his rent be regularly paid.  Much land is held by associations or companies known by the title of ‘Casamahanes.’  There is an active trade between Binan and Manila.”

“Greatly gratified with all we had seen, we again embarked and crossed the Laguna to Pasig.  Descending by that charming river, we reached Manila in the afternoon.””

YATCO.

The Yatco are one of Binan’s oldest fortunes.

Three Yatco-Mercado sisters “Tres Marias de Yatco” — Salud Yatco de Perlas, Leonila Yatco de Yaptinchay, and Paz Yatco de Ocampo — became the forebears of three of Binan’s “principalia” families.  They were the daughters of Ysidro Yatco and Bonifacia Mercado.

( Unconfirmed:  According to their descendants’ oral tradition, Bonifacia Mercado was an elder sister of Francisco Mercado, the father of National Hero Jose P. Rizal;  thus, they were Rizal’s paternal first cousins.  Bonifacia Mercado de Yatco and Francisco Mercado [ Francisco Engracio Mercado-Rizal ] were two of the thirteen children of Juan Mercado and Cirila Alejandra;  Francisco was the youngest of the thirteen children.  However, Bonifacia Mercado does not appear in the genealogy of Juan Mercado and Cirila Alejandra.  Perhaps she was a first or second cousin of Francisco Mercado’s. )

However, through their paternal Yatco line, “Tres Marias de Yatco” — Salud, Leonila, and Paz — were nieces of Jose ( Mercado ) Rizal.

Ysidro Yatco was a rich and prominent businessman.  He traveled to Europe in the 1880s.  In Paris, he bought furniture, chandeliers, and glassware [ crystal ];  in particular, he acquired a pair of Cristal Baccarat chandeliers for his Binan “sala” drawing room.  In London, he bought sterling silver and china services.  Many of those treasures were conserved in his house — inherited by his daughter Leonila and later known as the Yaptinchay-Yatco residence — through the decades until its destruction in the early 1980s.

Another daughter of Antonio Asuncion y Molo and Remigia Santa Ana of Santa Cruz, Manila, and a sister of Romana Asuncion de Carillo-Trinidad, Valentina Asuncion y Santa Ana married _____ Yatco and they had four children:  Eleuterio, Jose, Leoncio [ married Teodora Marcelino], and Filomena [ married Eugenio Alzona ].

The Alzona are also from Binan, Laguna.  Eugenio Alzona and Filomena Yatco had three sons:  Jose, Agripino and Cayo.  Cayo Alzona married _____ Amoranto and they had five children:  Encarnacion, Luz, Ceasar, Augusto and Octavio.  Cayo relocated his family to Tayabas, Quezon.  Dr. Encarnacion Amoranto Alzona Ph.D. became one of the most accomplished Filipinas of her generation.

[ There is currently a state congressman from Maryland named Augustus Alzona – judging from his name { please note the emperors' names in the first names }, he could be related to the Alzona family in the Philippines. - SR ]

YAPTINCHAY.

Concepcion “Nena” Yaptinchay-Zamora wrote:

“”According to Tia Epay ( JOSEFA CARRILLO TRINIDAD ), wife of Tio Kiko Yaptinchay, the first YAP TIN CHAY ( YAP is the family name and TIN CHAY is the first name ) who migrated to the Philippines was still a CHIQUITO* ( meaning a very young kid ).  Because of his youthful appearance, he was registered as son to his OLDER brother, because that was the easiest way to bring him into the country.  He learned his trade from his OLDER brother ( father ).”

“He met MARIA CARRILLO TRINIDAD, who belonged to a prominent family in Biñan, Laguna, whom he later married.  The couple had a son, ALBERTO C.T. YAPTINCHAY ( please take notice that the family name YAPTINCHAY as currently used is the combined first and last name of the original ancestral root, and which all his descendants continue to use ) and two daughters, namely:  SIMEONA and ISABEL.  ALBERTO married MACARIA GANA and they had 8 children, namely:  Julia, Andres, Guido, Maria, Raymunda, Bibiana, Josefa and Pablo.  SIMEONA married ANICETO YATCO and their children were: Petrona, Fermin, Pascuala, Angela and Maria.  ISABEL married PEDRO GUICO and had 2 children, namely:  Anastacio and Faustino.  We are all the descendants of the above.””

*CHIQUITO:  a five to seven year – old boy.  [  AA ]

Alberto Yaptinchay y Carillo-Trinidad [ o 1822 ] married Macaria Gana y _____ and they had eight children:  Julia [ Cirilo Carlos ], Andres [ married Teodora Zavalla ], Guido [ married Agustina Alberto y Sanchez de Carabaca ], Maria [ married Andres Almeda ], Josefa, Bibiana, Raymunda [ married Ramon Ocampo ], and Pablo [ married Leonila Yatco y Mercado ].

Guido Yaptinchay y Gana married Agustina Alberto y Sanchez de Carabaca, a beautiful mestiza of the rich Alberto family with Macanese [ Portuguese-Chinese ] ancestry.

Guido and Agustina Yaptinchay built and lived in an elegant, classical “bahay-na-bato” in the “poblacion” of Binan.

Guido and Agustina Yaptinchay had nine children:  Felix, Francisco, Albina, Agapito, Isidro, Miguel, Alberto, Privado, and Agustin.

Agustina passed away during the birth of her youngest child, Agustin.  Afterwards, the widower Guido Yaptinchay had a relationship with Catalina Medel, then Nicolasa Garcia, and then Isidra Bergonia.

Pablo Yaptinchay y Gana married Leonila Yatco y Mercado who was related to the National Hero Jose Protacio Alonso [ Mercado ] Rizal.  She was a cousin of Jose Rizal because her mother, Bonifacia Mercado, was a cousin of Jose’s father Francisco Mercado [ who married Teodora Alberto Realonda-Alonso, an "hija natural" of the rich Alberto family also of Binan ].  Leonila Yatco y Mercado was also a niece of Jose Rizal through the Yatco line.  The Mercado de Binan are among the descendants of the prominent Chinese merchant Domingo Lam-Co of historical renown.

The Yatco fortune was far older than the Yaptinchay fortune:  the Yatcos were already aristocrats when the Yaptinchays were overseers and managers.  At the time of their marriage, Leonila “Ilay” Yatco was richer than her husband, Pablo Yaptinchay.  In that context, she was the heiress and he the manager.

Leonila “Ilay” ruled over her husband and children.  It was the story in the family that while Pablo had his romantic assignations in the “entresuelo,” Ilay was upstairs fuming in the “sala,” planning her next moves.  During one town fiesta when she was sure that her husband’s current mistress would participate in the procession, she ordered her househelp to transfer several “oyas” terra cotta water containers with spigots to the “sala” “pasamano” window pane.  As the current mistress marched under the Yaptinchay-Yatco “sala” [ which overhung the street ], Ilay signaled the househelp to open the spigots, thus continuously drenching the offending lass.  Revenge, late 1800s style.

Pablo and Leonila Yaptinchay had six children:  Felix, Francisco, Macaria [ married Eliseo K. Abad ], Trinidad, Isidro [ married Josefina Yatco ], and Flora [ married Teodoro Evangelista ].

After Jose Rizal’s execution at the Bagumbayan field on 30 December 1896, Leonila “Ilay” Yatco de Yaptinchay was visited several times in secret by Jose’s sisters Saturnina, Olimpia, Narcisa, et. al. [ who were her maternal Mercado cousins ] who were requesting financial assistance.  Decades later, “Ilay” related the story to her daughters Macaria “Nena” [ Mrs. Eliseo K. Abad ], the spinster Trinidad “Tating,” and Flora “Flory” [ Mrs. Teodoro Evangelista ] that the Mercado Rizal-Alonso sisters used to pass, indeed scurry through, the “voladas” outer galleries of the house so as to avoid being seen by non-family members, lest their visits be the subject of seditious rumors which could harm her [ Ilay ].

Pablo and Leonila Yaptinchay lived in an interesting “bahay-na-bato” in the “poblacion” of Binan, near the rear of the parish church.  The residence began with an ancestral Yatco “bahay-na-bato” [ Leonila's ], probably late 1700s, which was extended by a new structure sometime in the 1830s, like a train, all the way to the other street, which became its new frontage.  Their descendants remember it as having been a rather long house.

The Yaptinchay-Yatco residence eventually devolved to the youngest daughter Flora “Flory” Yatco Yaptinchay-Evangelista [ Mrs. Teodoro Evangelista ].  She declared that she had bought out her siblings from the house.  Teodoro and Flora Evangelista had two children:  Teodoro Jr. “Teddy” and Tina.

In true Yaptinchay-Yatco fashion, Flora “Flory” Yatco Yaptinchay-Evangelista was a character…  Irritated by the long drawn-out shooting in her ancestral home of director Bert Avellana’s “Portrait of the Artist as Filipino” in 1965, she periodically stormed into the house [ all the way from Manila to Binan, Laguna ], inquiring and ordering:  “Shooting ng shooting!!!  Aba, kailan ba matatapos ang shooting na ito???  Bert, tapusin mo na ang shooting shooting mo!!!”

The Yaptinchay-Yatco residence was the setting for director Lamberto V. Avellana’s 1965 masterpiece “Portrait of the Artist as Filipino,” a film adaptation of Nick Joaquin’s famous play, starring Daisy Hontiveros-Avellana and Naty Crame-Rogers as the spinster sisters Candida and Paula Marasigan, respectively.  Thus, the family house and its contents were immortalized on film.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjELRj9rwbs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrZ_WrFBV3c&feature=related

Apart from its history and pedigree, the Yaptinchay-Yatco residence was also haunted… by the ghosts of its former residents.  When Jose Ma. Ricardo “Joey” Yaptinchay-Abad Panlilio met one of the principal actresses of Avellana’s 1965 “Portrait of the Artist as Filipino” for the first time during the filming of the CCP’s “Noli Me Tangere” in Vigan, Ilocos Sur in 1992, she related that during their first shooting day in the house, she was alone in the “sala” when a kind old lady and old gentleman approached and welcomed her warmly into their home.  They inquired about her well-being and they actually had a pleasant chat.  It was only when the old couple had left the “sala” that the actress remembered that they were dressed elegantly and beautifully, but oddly in the fashion of an era long gone.  Looking around the spacious “sala,” she noticed the two antique, full-length portraits of an old lady and an old gentleman and realized, to her increasing disbelief, that they were the ones who had just spoken with her.  When the current owner, Flora “Flory” Yatco Yaptinchay-Evangelista arrived some hours later and was told about the actress’ supernatural experience, she confirmed that the ghosts must have been her Yatco grandparents, if they looked like the antique portraits in the “sala”…

Architect Roberto “Bobby” Quisumbing, a descendant of Guido Yaptinchay y Gana, recalled:  “The Pablo Yaptinchay house had a long room at the back which had two rows of altar tables with ivory ‘santos’ one after the other…”  [ the long hallway outside those rooms is visible in the first YouTube video of "Portrait...":  the scene where Tony Javier forcibly looks for the painting from Candida Marasigan. ]

OCAMPO.

According to Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias:

Lolo Gil Ocampo married Lolo Magdalena Leyva Arevalo, son was Lolo Edilberto Ocampo, Mayor of Binan 1906-1909.
2nd Generation
Lolo Edilberto married Lola Ma. Paz Yatco y Rizal.
3rd Generation
Sons were Mauro Y. Ocampo and Vicente Y. Ocampo.

Mauro Yatco Ocampo (Lolo Bolo) married Adoracion Amante Nolasco (Lola Adoracion).
4th Generation
Their children are Magdalena, Lourdes, Dolores, Norma & Mauro Jr.
Magdalena (Nitang) married Felicito Gonzales, Lourdes (Ditas) married Dionisio Capunitan, Dolores (Lolita) Married Ramon Raymundo, Norma (Normie) married Jose L. Cobarrubias Jr. & Mauro Jr. married Imelda Morales.

5th Generation
Magdalena-Felicito has 6 kids: Mariano,Felnito, Jacobo, Pedro +, Felicito Jr. & Fernando
Lourdes-Dionisio has 4 kid: Roberto; Josephine, Evelyn & Susan
Dolores-Ramon has 4 kids: George; Fe Caridad, Jesus +, & Jim Anthony
Norma-Jose has 6 kids: Jose Luis, Jose Fernando; Jose Reynaldo; Jose Marie +; Jose Victor & Ma. Kristina
Mauro Jr.-Imelda has 5 kids: Adoracion; Mauro III, Erickson, Normadia, & Nowelyn

Vicente Y. Ocampo (Lolo Enteng) married Maxima Mercado (Lola Chimang)
3 kid: Leonardo, Renato & Erlinda

Yatco-Rizal
Lolo Ysidro Yatco married Lola Bonifacia Rizal has 3 kids. Ma. Salud married Pablo Perlas, Ma. Paz married Edilberto Ocampo & Ma. Leonila married Pablo Yatpinchay.

Bustamante (Amante) Clan
Adoracion Amante Nolasco clan. – Married Mauro Yatco Ocampo
Padre Santiago Bustmante married Juana Villamor- only son Mariano
Mariano V. Bustamante married Ma. Sorbito Regular only daugther Catalina.

Nolasco clan.
Eifemio Lim Yuatco Nolasco married Ma. Blasica Fernandez, only son Bibiano.

Catalina Amante y Regular married Bibiano Fernandez Nolasco. only daugther Adoracion Nolasco y Amante (Lola Adoracion)

POTENCIANO.  Mariano Potenciano married Ceferina Gana y ____ and had _ children:  Pablo, Ubaldo, et. al..

According to Michael Potenciano Almendral:

A story an aunt remembers hearing from my grandfather was that the original family surname was ARAMBULO from the neighboring Dominican hacienda of San Pedro Tunasan. An unnamed ancestor had a quarrel with his father, moved to Binan and changed his surname to POTENCIANO. Unfortunately, I have no way of verifying if this story is true. What is certain is that by the 1800’s the Potencianos were already established enough in Binan that JOSE POTENCIANO, the earliest ancestor that can be found in the surviving parish records, became a Capitan in 1833, 1846, and 1847. His marriage to MICAELA AREVALO, daughter of JOSE AREVALO(Capitan 1833), produced the siblings MARIANO, DOMINGO, and ROMAN.

The AREVALO-POTENCIANO Line
============================
MARIANO(Capitan 1861) married CEFERINA REYES GANA, daughter of GASPAR GANA(Capitan 1830). Their children were PABLO, CANDIDO, FRANCISCO, ISIDRA, and SILVERIA. Mariano also had a common-law-wife, CIRILA CORVA, with whom he had ENGRACIO, CANDIDA, PASTOR, and MIGUEL all of whom were baptized with the POTENCIANO surname.

*CEFERINA’s sister, MACARIA, married ALBERTO YAPTINCHAY establishing the link to the Yaptinchays.

*CEFERINA’s paternal half-uncle EULALIO(Capitan 1850, 1867-68) , son of the GANA patriarch VICENTE TANG GANA by his second wife TOMASA, married FLORENTINA POTENCIANO and established the other POTENCIANO-GANA line from which descended EDUARDO(Capitan 1886-87), father of Don MENONG, Don ENCHONG, and Dona LOLAY GANA-VALENCIA; and JESUALDO(Capitan 1895-98). I still need to do further research to find out exactly how FLORENTINA is related to JOSE and MARIANO.

DOMINGO married BRIGIDA MERCADO.

ROMAN married VALERIANA CRISOLOGO and LORENZA ALMARINES.

The GANA-POTENCIANO Line
========================
PABLO(1858-1941, Capitan 1889) married FELIZA GARCIA(1859-1929), daughter of AGATON GARCIA(Capitan 1877-78) and MARIA SALOME ALMEDA CARLOS who also comes from a family with a long history of Capitanes. They had three sons, MARIANO, UBALDO, and CONRADO.

The “Tres Caidas” which still goes out every Holy Wednesday was inherited by FELIZA from her GARCIA(pronounced gar-sha’) ancestors. The POTENCIANO ancestral home which stands to this day was built in the older transitional bahay na bato style. It is a very long house with a steeply hipped roof and sawali ceilings. Delicately carved rococo floral swags decorate the frieze above the windows. The original capiz were later changed to green and clear French panes. It was used as the headquarters of the Japanese Imperial Army who occupied the town during WWII and fundoshi-clad Japanese soldiers loved to take their baths in the covered swimming pool on the grounds. It also served as the elementary school for a short period after the war. Pablo died in Malate in 1941. That house on 111 Calle Remedios burned in 1945 and along with it the original Senor of the Tres Caidas.

CANDIDO married RUFINA GANA. Their only child, Col. PELAGIO POTENCIANO, married MAXIMA BLOUSE daughter of MAX BLOUSE, founder of BTCo and LTBCo which eventually became BLTBCo.

FRANCISCO POTENCIANO married GERARDA MARFORI

ISIDRA POTENCIANO married MARIANO LOPEZ DE LEON. Their son, PASCUAL, remarried to TORIBIA EDRALIN(related to FM’s mother) of Sarrat, Ilocos Norte. The family owns the carroza of “La Muerte de San Jose”.

SILVERIA POTENCIANO(1873-1940) married MARIANO BAYLON in 1914. The BAYLON ancestral home is one of the last few remaining bahay na bato’s in town. A cavernous bat infested camalig occupies almost half of the three-level house.The Baylons owned the original processional carroza of the Agony in the Garden.

The GARCIA-POTENCIANO Line
=========================
MARIANO RICARDO(1882-1955), being the eldest son, was groomed to follow in Kapitan Ambo’s footsteps but the Americans came and changed the old political system. He and his family moved back to Binan around 1943 to escape the hardships of war in Manila. They were forced to live with the Japanese officers who took over the old Potenciano house. He and his family moved to the house beside the Yaptinchays on Capinpin Street, a few steps from the plaza, in the early 50’s.

The second child, UBALDO(1885-1941), was a doctor who also headed the town’s “sanidad”. He and his son were killed by the Japanese in Tayabas. Only his daughter survived the war.

The youngest, CONRADO(1888-1951), was a surgeon. He and his family settled in Santa Mesa on V.Mapa. He was elected into Congress in 1941. He owned FARMACIA POTENCIANO on Calle Solana in pre-war Intramuros. His son founded Polymedic General Hospital now VRPMC.

CASAS.  The well-preserved Casas ancestral house was built by the spinster Josefa Yaptinchay y Gana [ ca. 1870 ] who bequeathed it to her niece, Encarnacion Almeda y Yaptinchay, who married Francisco Casas y Concepcion of Ermita, Manila.  Encarnacion was a daughter of Josefa Yaptinchay’s sister Capitana Maria Yaptinchay who married Andres Almeda.

Encarnacion Yaptinchay Almeda and Francisco Concepcion Casas had three daughters:  Maria Paz [ married Ramon Gana Mercado ];  Trinidad [ married Dr. Alfonso Mangahas Cuyegkeng of Ermita, Manila ];  Carmen [ married Francisco Manabat ].  All of the Casas-Almeda grandchildren spent their growing years in the house.

The house is particularly noted for a splendid, silverplated altar similar to those found in old churches.

Another splendid, silverplated altar — similar to the one currently installed in the Casas ancestral house — was inherited from another set of Yaptinchay forebears by Trinidad Almeda Casas-Cuyegkeng.  She donated it to the SVD Society of the Divine Word seminary near Tagaytay city.

The house was featured as one of the settings in the classic, 1976 Eddie Romero masterpiece film “Ganito kami noon, Paano kayo ngayon?”.  It served as the residence of the lead character Nicolas “Kulas” Ocampo, played by Christopher de Leon.

According to Antonio Casas Cuyegkeng:

Encarnacion (Oneng) Yaptinchay Almeda was born on March 25, 1885, the second child of Andres Almeda and Maria Gana Yaptinchay (Kapitang Maria).  On March 15, 1917, she got married to Francisco (Kiko) Concepcion Casas of Manila.  There are no known stories how the two, one from Biñan and one from Manila met.

Francisco Concepcion Casas is said to come from Casas lineage of Bulacan, rather than from the Casas family of Batangas that Archbishop Artemio Casas belonged to.

The marriage was blessed with 4 children: Maria Paz (Pacita or Pacing) married to Ramon (Monching) Gana Mercado; Trinidad (Trining) married to Alfonso (Al) Maria Mangahas Cuyegkeng of Manila and Bulacan; then 2 boys, Andresing, who died less than 3 months after birth and the other born dead; and the youngest, Carmen (Mameng) married to Francisco (Kikoy) Cariso Manabat. Both Monching Mercado and Kikoy Manabat are from Biñan.

Kiko and Oneng Casas lived at the corner of A. Mabini and Isaac Peral (U.N. Avenue) Streets in Ermita, Manila till around 1943.  Kiko, a pharmacist, also had his drugstore, Farmacia Nuestra Señora de Guia, in the said corner.

During their stay in Ermita, Pacita graduated as the valedictorian of her high school class at the St. Theresa’s College, in San Marcelino Street, Ermita, Manila, and a college degree, with honors, in Accounting  and Education from the same school.

While Pacita was convalescing at the San Juan de Dios Hospital in Intramuros, Alfonso (Al) Ma. Cuyegkeng saw Trining Casas during one of the weekday masses at the nearby Santuario de of San Antonio.  Al Cuyegkeng and Trining Casas got married before the Casas family moved back to Biñan.

The Ermita house of the Casas family was completely destroyed during the liberation of Manila.

When the Casas family moved back to Biñan, it was not to the maternal house given by the spinster Josefa Yaptinchay y Gana, the sister of Kapitang Maria.  The said house was then being used by the Japanese Imperial Army as headquarters.  Most probably, the family stayed at the bahay na bato owned by Oneng’s brother, Antonio Yaptinchay Almeda married to Ricarda Sta. Ana Medel on A. Mabini Street going towards de La Paz, as Trining gave birth to her second child in the intersuelo of the said house on February 5, 1945.  Trining Cuyegkeng could not be brought to the hospital as the guerrillas were entering Biñan to liberate the town from the Japanese forces.

Pacita Casas got married to Monching Mercado in 1946 and settled in the Casas Maternal house till the growing commercialization and pollution in the area forced Monching and Pacing to relocate to Alabang.  Monching Mercado, a Biñan guerrilla leader, was the son of Mariano Mercado and Romana Gana.  The Mercado maternal house was also in A. Mabini, now Jacobo Gonzales, Street towards San Antonio, almost opposite the eskenita, now known as Noli Gana Road, connecting A. Mabini, now Jacobo Gonzales, street to the street now called General Capinpin.

Monching returned to farming, went into rural banking with 4 friends from Cabuyao, as well as help the Canlubang Sugar Central, as treasurer of the CABALAG (Cavite/Batangas/Laguna Sugar Farmers Federation). Pacing was, for a while, principal in Sta. Catalina School in Biñan, a housewife and caretaker of Lolo Kiko and Lola Oneng.

In the late 1950’s Monching and Pacing established RAM (Ramon, Amparo, Ma. Paz) Food Products, first in Biñan, at the backyard of the Mercado maternal house, and, then, in Barrio Pulo, Cabuyao.  Amparo Gana Mercado, sister of Monching, was a Home Economics graduate of Philippine Women’s University functioned as the food technologist.

After the war, Al was commuting between St. Anthony’s Hospital in the Oroquieta area of Manila, near the Espiritu Santo Church, and Biñan.  St. Anthony’s Hospital was owned by his close friends Dr. Antonio and Fidela Lazatin of Pampanga.

When the residence Al and Trining were building got finished, they moved the family back to the corner of A. Mabini and Isaac Peral (U.N. Avenue) Streets in Ermita, Manila. The ground floor of the structure was occupied by Valleson’s Department Store, in the corner, Farmacia Nuestra Senora de Guia owned by Al and Trining, in the middle, and a baby’s store, Angel’s Wear, a joint venture between Pacing and Trining.  Al had his medical clinic at the back of the pharmacy.  Al and Trining’s growing brood occupied the second floor till the mid 1962.

Trining finished her pharmacy degree, which was disrupted by the war, from the Philippine Women’s University soon after moving back to Ermita.  When the members of her brood had had started settling down with their own families, Trining went back to PWU and obtained a master’s degree, and, then, a Doctor of Philosophy  degree in Social Work.

Mameng Casas, who is 6 years younger than Trining, finished high school in Sta. Catalina School in Biñan.  After which, Mameng enrolled in St. Theresa’s College in San Marcelino Street.  She stayed at the penthouse of Al and Trining’s residence during her schooling days.  Trining was her guardian.  While Mameng was in St. Theresa’s College, Kikoy was finishing his Law at the Ateneo Law School in Padre Faura, Ermita.

After Mameng graduated, Dr. Leoncio (Leony) Yatco occupied the penthouse upon his return from overseas studies till he got married to Letty Yaptinchay.

Kikoy and Mameng settled in Biñan, where Kikoy practiced law.  Kikoy joined government service and started as a clerk of Court of Biñan, till he got promoted to Judge of the Court of First Instance in Sta. Cruz, Laguna.

ALMEDA.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jK46-3RvMH8&feature=channel

BAYLON.  The conserved Baylon-Gana ancestral house devolved to a grandson, Eduardo Baylon Zavalla Gan, who married Carmelita Palanca Gonzalez.  The house devolved to his heirs.

MERCADO.

GONZALES.

LOPEZ DE LEON.  The Lopez de Leon family was originally from “Palanyag,” now Paranaque.  It was by marriage that the Binan branch of the family was established.  The youngest of the third generation, Pedro Lopez de Leon y Ferrer, “teniente mayor” of Binan from 1894-1895, married Maxima Carillo-Trinidad y Gana.

Their eldest son Mariano married Isidra Potenciano, also of Binan.  The Lopez de Leon house still stands on Calle Capinpin, Binan’s main street. Across the house was the residence of General Mateo Capinpin with its spacious grounds.

SUMMARY, ANALYSIS, AND COMMENTARY ON THE GENEALOGIES OF THE FAMILIES OF OLD BINAN, LAGUNA BY ANTONIO CASAS CUYEGKENG:

ANCESTOR

 

Yap Tin Chay was probably born in Xiamen, Fujian province, China and brought to the Philippines by an older brother, who was a (magtitimon) rower of a Chinese vessel bound for Manila, as a very young child. Because of his age and youthful appearance, Chiquito was registered as son to his older brother, this being the easiest way to bring him into the country From then on Tin Chay Yap was said to have been adopted by Intramuros friars, probably Agustinians, because during the time the Yap brothers arrived in the Philippines, Biñan was still part of the Augustinian Province (Noni Agulto 02/15/10).

He was baptized Pablo Yaptinchay (Cesar Cariño 10/23/10) and got married to Maria Carrillo-Trinidad. 

While the Carrillo-Trinidad family is a prominent family in Biñan, the ancestry of Maria Carrillo-Trinidad is unknown.

The Carrillo-Trinidad family found at the OFBL originated with the marriage of Romana Asuncion y Santa Ana of Santa Cruz, Manila, to Andres Carrillo-Trinidad of Biñan, Laguna (Sonny Rayos 06/11/10).  At a later stage, the Carrillo-Trinidad family name disappeared in Biñan as the Biñan Carrillo’s dropped the Trinidad after an incident, probably with the prominent Carrillo-Trinidad’s in neighboring Carmona, Cavite (Noni Agulto 02/15/10).

Pablo and Maria Yaptinchay had three (3) children.  The eldest, Alberto, born in 1822, married Macaria Reyes Gana, Simeona married Miguel Gomes Yatco, and the youngest, Isabel married Pedro Basedilla Guico (Cesar Cariño 10/23/10).

FIRST GENERATION – YAPTINCHAY

Macaria Roberta Gana, wife of Alberto, was a member of what seems to be the oldest family in old Biñan.  Macaria was the granddaughter of Vicente Tang-Gana with his first wife, Gertudes De Los Reyes.  There is no record has to when and why Vicente dropped “Tang” from the family’s surname.  Vicente and Gertudes Tang-Gana had only one child, Gaspar, who married Gertrudes Santimora Roberta of Chinese descent (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11).  Macaria was the 5th child of Gaspar and Gertudes Gana.

Miguel Gomes Yatco, husband of Simeona, was the eldest son of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes.  However, in the research of Dr. Leoncio (Tito Leony) Gana Yatco, his name was Aniceto Yatco (Cesar Cariño 06/06/11).

Vicente Tang Gana was assumed to be a 1st generation Chinese immigrant from China like Yap Tin Chay (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11).  Vicente could be 1 generation ahead of Yap Tin Chay, or of the same generation but ages apart.  Of the same generation as Yap Tin Chay were Andres Carillo –Trinidad and Marcos Dimas Yatco.  Unlike Yap Tin Chay,  the ancestry of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Andres Carrillo-Trinidad are unknown (Noni Agulto 08/16/11).

There is no further entry on the ancestry of Pedro Basedilla Guico, husband of Isabel, except that he is the son of Luis Guico and Josefa Basedilla.

SECOND GENERATION – ALBERTO CT. YAPTINCHAY

 

Alberto Carillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Macaria Roberta Gana had eight (8) children.

The 1998 Yaptinchay tree did not contain any descendant for Julia, the eldest; the second child and eldest son, Andres; and the 5th child, Raymunda.  The list simply said that Julia Yaptinchay married Cirilo Carlos, Andres Yaptinchay married Teodora Zavalla and Raymunda Yaptinchay married Ramon Ocampo.  Daughters Bibiana Yaptinchay, the 6th child, and Josefa Yaptinchay, the 7th, never got married.

The ancestry of Ramon Ocampo, husband of Raymunda, and is unknown.

Guido, the 3rd child and 2nd son, married Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto and they had 9 children.

The roots of Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto was a descendant of the daughter of Dona Isabel Alberto de Sanchez, sister of  Lorenzo Alejandro Alberto, married to Brigida de Quintos, and parents of the mother of the hero Jose Alonzo Rizal.  They are the children of Cypriano and  Maria Florentina Alejandro Alberto (Noni Agulto 08/19/11).

After Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto passed away, the widower, Guido, had a relationship, first with Nicolasa Garcia, with whom he had 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls, all surnamed Garcia. The said relationship was followed by a liaison with Catalina Sta. Ana Medel, with whom Guido had 4 children, 1 boy and 3 girls, all surnamed Medel. Guido’s last partner was Isidra C. Bergonia, with whom he had 3 children, 1 boy and 2 girls, all surnamed Agulto (Nonie Agulto 04/16/10).

The 2nd daughter, Maria, more commonly known as (Kapitang Maria), married Andres Ponce Almeda. Andres and Maria Almeda had 5 children.  However, according to Cesar Cariño (08/16/11) there was another daughter, for a total of 6 children.

While the Almeda family is a prominent family in Biñan, nothing else is known about the ancestry Andres Ponce Almeda., except for his being the son of Antonio Almeda and Maria Dolores Ponce.

The oldest Almeda in the web were from Pedro Paterno’s listing of Biñan leaders (alcalde, kapitan or gobernadorcillo) from 1757-1898. The list included 1851 – Don Lazaro Almeda Carlos; 1854 – Don Jose Almeda Carlos; and 1858-59 – Don Agaton Almeda Carlos.  The fourth Almeda in the list, Don Andres Almeda, was for Kapitan in 1888 (Nonie Agulto 04/13/10).  Considering the period involved was during the Spanish regime, could they be using the Spanish name format?  If yes, then the names should have been written as “Almeda y Carlos”.

The youngest child and son, Pablo, married Leonila Mercado Yatco, a first cousin of the national hero Jose Alonzo Rizal (Cesar Cariño 08/01/10).

Leonila Mercado Yatco is a descendant of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes.  Her grandfather, Gregorio, is the youngest brother of Miguel Gomes Yatco, the husband of Simeona Carillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay.  Her mother, Bonifacia Alejandra Mercado, was the older sister of Francisco Engracio Alejandro Rizal-Mercado married to Teodora De Quintos Alonzo Realonda, the father of Jose Alonzo Rizal (Antonio Cuyegkeng 09/08/11).

THIRD GENERATION – ALBERTO CT. YAPTINCHAY

Of the 9 children of Guido and Agustina Yaptinchay, only one was a girl, the 3rd child, Albina, who never got married (Nonie Agulto 06/01/10).

Of the 8 sons, there were no mention about their families, except that the eldest, Felix Yaptinchay, got married to Josefa C. Gana, the 2nd, Francisco Yaptinchay, married Josefa Carrillo Trinidad, the 5th, Isidro Yaptinchay, married Francisca Morando, and the 8th child, Librado (Privado) Yaptinchay, was assumed to have remained single.

The ancestry of Josefa C. Gana, wife of Felix, and Josefa Carrillo Trinidad, wife of Francisco are unknown.

The 4th child, Agapito Yaptinchay, married Avelina (Belen) Luna from Malabon and had 4 children.

Miguel Yaptinchay, the 6th child, married Maria Mateo. They had an only child, Guillermo.

The 7th child, Alberto Yaptinchay, married Milagros Marfori, had 5 children.

The youngest, Agustin Yaptinchay, married Francisca Amoranto and had 2 daughters.

Andres Almeda and Kapitang Maria Almeda had 5 or 6 children.  The 1998 Yaptinchay tree showed no other information on the eldest child, Rosenda, other than her marrying Macario Carrillo.  As to the 3rd daughter, Meruacion, born around 1895, and married to Timoteo de Mesa (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11), she was never mentioned in any family gatherings of the children of Kapitang Maria.

The ancestry of Macario Carrillo, husband of Rosenda Almeda, is unknown.

The second child Encarnacion married Francisco Concepcion Casas from Manila.

The eldest son, Antonio married Ricarda Sta. Ana Medel.

Esteban married Lazara Sabas.

Raymunda married Mariano S. Cruz Yatco.

Mariano S. Cruz Yatco, a descendant of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes, was the 6th child of Leoncio Asuncion Yatco and Ysidora Faustorino Cruz.  His grandfather, Ignacio Gomes Yatco, married to Valentina Sta. Ana Asuncion, was the younger brother of the husband of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay, Miguel Gomes Yatco. 

His grandmother, Valentina Sta. Ana Asuncion, was the eldest sister of Romana Asuncion y Santa Ana who married Andres Carrillo-Trinidad that started the known Carrillo-Trinidad line in Binan, Laguna.

Pablo and Leonila Yaptinchay had 8 children.  There were no indications as to whether the daughter, Trinidad, and the son, Alberto, got married or remained single. The eldest, Francisco, married Anita Cartegna, while the 2nd son, Francisco married Amparo De Los Reyes.  The 4th child, Isidro married Josefina Salterio Yatco, and daughter, Tita married Hermenegildo La’O.  Macaria got married to Eliseo Abad and youngest daughter, Flora, married Teodoro Evangelista, Sr.

The ancestry of Josefina Salterio Yatco, wife of Isidro Yaptinchay, is unknown.

FOURTH GENERATION – ALBERTO CT. YAPTINCHAY

By the 4th generation, probably due to greater mobility and better educational opportunities, marriage between the families became less.

Of the children of Agapito and Avelina Yaptinchay, 2 married into old Biñan families.  The eldest, Angel, married Rafaela Toribio Gana . 

Rafaela Toribio Gana was a 5th generation of descendant of Vicente Tang-Gana with his second wife, Tomasa Apolonia.  Her great grandfather, Eulalio Apolonia Gana, married Florentina Potenciano.  However, ancestry of Florentina Potenciano is unknown.  The ancestry of her grandmother, Filomena Ocampo, wife of Eduardo Potenciano Gana, is also unknown.

The eldest daughter, Leticia, married Leoncio Gana Yatco.

Leoncio Gana Yatco was a 4th generation descendant of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes. His great grandfather, Ignacio, was the 5th child of Marcos and Maria, Dimas Yatco, and married to Valentina Sta. Ana Asuncion (See Marcos S. Cruz Yatco above.). His father, Jose S., married Generosa Cruz Gana, is the older brother of Mariano S., husband of Raymunda Yaptinchay Almeda,

Generosa Cruz Gana was the daughter of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana with his first wife. Crisanta Cruz. Jesualdo Potenciano Gana was the younger brother of Eduardo Potencaino Gana (See above.).

None of the grand children of Andres and Maria Almeda and Pablo and Leonila Yaptinchay married into an old Biñan family, except for Ma. Paz Almeda Casas.

Ma. Paz Almeda Casas married Ramon Gana Mercado.  However, the ancestry of Mariano Mercado and Romana Gana, parents of Ramon Gana Mercado, are unknown.  Mariano Mercado was supposed to have been from Malabon.

SECOND GENERATION – SIMEONA CT. YAPTINCHAY YATCO

Of the children of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Miguel Gomes Yatco, only the only son, Fermin,  married into an old Biñan family.

Fermin Yaptinchay Yatco married Pertonilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad and they had 9 children.   However, the marriage did not last. Pertonilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad became the 2nd spouse of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana.  Fermin “married” Paulina Rosales.

Pertonilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad was the eldest child of Andres Carrillo-Trinidad and Romana Sta. Ana Asuncion (See above.).

Jesualdo Potenciano Gana was the second son of Eulalio Apolonia Gana married to Florentina Potenciano.  Eulalio was the eldest child of Vicente Tan-Gana and his second wife, Tomasa Apolonia,.

The ancestry of Florentina Potenciano, wife of Eulalio Apolonia Gana, is unknown.

The eldest daughter of Miguel and Simeona Yatco, Petrona, married a Rotea.  Daughters Pascaula and Maria married the brothers Lazaro and pablo Velasco, respectively.  The 3rd daughter, Teodora Angela married Juanito (Jacinto) Alzona, and the youngest, Nicolasa, married Andres Laseano.

After Fermin and Petronilla Yatco, no descendants of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Miguel Gomes Yatco have been noted to have married into definitely identifiable members of families named in the main section of FOBL.

SECOND GENERATION – ISABEL CT. YAPTINCHAY GUICO

Isabel Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Pedro Basedilla Guico had 3 children.  The eldest of Anastacio married Macaria Mercado Rizal.

The 2nd son, Faustino, or Florentino per Cesar Cariño (Nonie Agulto 02/21/11), married Miguela Gana Carrillo, while the youngest, Fernando, married Agapita Gana Carrillo.

Miguela Gana Carrillo, wife of Faustino, and Agapita Gana Carrillo, wife of Fernando, were first cousins.

Miguela’s mother, Francisca, was the elder sister of Donata, the mother of Agapita.  They were children on Gaspar De Los Reyes Gana with his first wife, Gertrudes Santimora Roberta (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11).  While Donata used Roberta as a middle name, most of the records show that Francisca, Macaria, and Ceferina used Reyes as their middle name (Cesar Cariño 09/23/10).  Macaria Reyes Gana was the wife of Alberto Carillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay (See above.), while Ceferina Reyes Gana was the wife of Macario Ricardo Arevalo Potenciano, the eldest son Jose Potenciano and Micaela Arevalo.

The ancestries of Juan Carrillo-Trinidad, husband of Francisca Reyes Gana, and Ambrosio Carrillo, husband of Donata Roberta Gana are unknown.  The relationship between Juan Carrillo-Trinidad and Ambrosio Carrillo have also not been established.

THIRD GENERATION – ISABEL CT. YAPTINCHAY GUICO

 

No children of Anastacio and Macaria Yaptinchay Guico married into members of families named in the main section of FOBL.  There is no information as to the children of Fernando and Agapita Yaptinchay Guico

Florentino and Miguela Yaptinchay Guico has 3 children.  The eldest child, Isidra, married Ignacio Almeda Yatco.

 

Ignacio Almeda Yatco, husband of Isidra Carrillo Guico, is the grandson of Igancio Gomes Yatco and Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion.    Igancio was the younger brother of Miguel Gomes Yatco, husband of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay (See above.).  The parents of Ignacio were Jose “Coseng” Asuncion Yatco and Victoria Custodio Almeda.  The ancestry of Victoria Custodio Almeda is unknown.

The second daughter, Maria, married Fernando C. Belizario.

The first wife of the only son, Eduardo, was Leonila Potenciano Lopez-De Leon. The second wife was Guillerma E. Evasco.

Leonila Potenciano Lopez-De Leon, first wife of Eduardo, was the daughter of Isidra Gana Potenciano and Mariano Trinidad Lopez de Leon, and great granddaughter of Jose Potenciano and Micaela Arevalo and Vicente Tang-Gana and his second wife, Tomasa Apolonia.

After Eduardo and Leonila Guico, no descendants been noted to have married into definitely identifiable members of families named in the main section of FOBL.

THE COLLECTIVE MATERIAL CULTURE.

Architect Roberto Quisumbing, a descendant of Guido Yaptinchay y Gana, recalled:  “The Pablo Yaptinchay house had a long room at the back which had two rows of altar tables with ivory ‘santos’ one after the other…”  [ the long hallway outside those rooms is visible in the first YouTube video of "Portrait...":  the scene where Tony Javier forcibly looks for the painting from Candida Marasigan. ]

*unfinished*

Acknowledgments:  Jose Ma. Ricardo Yaptinchay-Abad Panlilio, Lourdes Yaptinchay Abad-Panlilio, Cita Yaptinchay Abad-Dinglasan, Maria Juanita Yaptinchay Eligir-Cueto, + Leticia Luna Yaptinchay-Yatco, + Oscar Luna Yaptinchay, Arch. Roberto Quisumbing, Antonio Agulto, Rafael Gana Hocson, Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias, Michael Potenciano Almendral, Antonio Casas Cuyegkeng, Dr. Victor Casas Manabat, Lucy Francisco Borromeo, Augusto Gonzalez Gan, Sonny Rayos, Ma. Laura Lopez de Leon, Cesar Carino, et. al..

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356 Comments

  1. Christine H.P. Eustaquio said,

    August 24, 2014 at 5:38 am

    Hi Toto, I was told by Chris Yatco that his Lola Valentina Asuncion’s husband was Enacio Yatco. So there, you can have his complete name now. (Valentina was Romana’s sister from whom i descend, through her daughter, Josefa Carrillo Quintos.)

  2. jay santos said,

    July 11, 2014 at 4:46 pm

    this query is peripheral to most of these comments, but does anybody know if valentin evangelista, is the father of teodoro evangelista? and is he the painter v. evangelista active in the early 19th century?
    would appreciate any information on this.

  3. gerry g. lirio said,

    July 4, 2014 at 5:49 am

    I am trying to get some info about my great grantparents. Diego Yatco (middle unkno wn) married Basilisa Berroya (middle na m e also unknown). I remember a Vicente Ocampo whose house has bilyaran. Thatwas in the late 50’s. I also spend weekends in San Antonio with ourLelong Kua.
    Thanks a lot.
    P.S. My grandmother was born in San Pedro Laguna

    a

  4. James Casas said,

    July 1, 2014 at 4:04 pm

    Sorry I didn’t get to complete a sentence in a previous post.

    What I meant was with 2 sides of my family having the same family name, it can get difficult but interesting to find out where clues might lead to.

    I could certainly use some help.

    Thanks again.

  5. James Casas said,

    July 1, 2014 at 3:59 pm

    By the way, I have a couple of links for my Grandma’s cousin, Alfredo Carmelo y Casas:

    http://www.philstar.com/opinion/445905/legacy-alfredo-carmelo

    http://www.philstar.com/opinion/445905/legacy-alfredo-carmelo

    Back to my digging….

  6. James Casas said,

    July 1, 2014 at 3:52 pm

    Hi Toto.

    I am so fascinated reading through this blog and wish to thank you for making this information available. I’ve been trying to trace our roots and have found this so enlightening.

    My mom, Veronica Lontoc Casas (God rest her soul) is a cousin of the Casas’ from Biñan and have visited the old Casas house there as a small boy. I remember my grand mother, Loudes Casas Lontoc telling me about her cousin, Alfredo Carmelo y Casas ( the aviator and artist) also known as “the Birdman of the Philippines” and stakeholder of Carmelo y Bauermann. My great grandfather, (motherside) is Telesforo Casas, was a pharmacist who had a pharmacy in Binondo. He was married to Juanita Casas (maiden name still being traced)

    My dad, Agustin de la Cruz Casas is from the Casas clan from Meycauayan, Bulacan and is a cousin of Bishop Artemio Casas. That’s where I found it confusing to read that the bishop’s family is from Batangas.

    With 2 sides of my family with the same

    I’m still working on this and I hope to find more information somewhere.

    Thanks again,

    James

  7. Noni agulto said,

    June 13, 2014 at 4:18 am

    It’s great to hear from you Ms Norma. hope you can share more stories about the bahay na bato…

  8. May 3, 2014 at 8:37 pm

    isang pisa-Vicente Tang Gana,please join

  9. April 29, 2014 at 2:56 pm

    Hello . . . i am ARMIE ALZONA DE LOS REYES – VELAS, born in Binan, Laguna in 1955 . . . mother is LUZVIMINDA ALZONA from san joseph, binan, laguna and father BEN DE LOS REYES from Naujan, Oriental Mindoro . . . please help me trace our roots from my grandfather PACIFICO “Pacito” ALZONA married to LUCIA BIRI. He was a policeman in the 50’s . . . his parents were Daniel Alzona and Adriana Tanael . . . please help me find our missing links . . . thank you . . .

  10. norma m. burce said,

    April 28, 2014 at 11:08 pm

    Mr. Toto Gonzalez / Mr. Noni Agulto, please include my late mother Agueda San Buenaventura Yaptinchay she is the illigitimate child of Francisco Yaptinchay. My mother commonly known as “ading” lived for a while in the home known as Bahay na bato with the yaptinchay together with ninang Leonor Agulto.Thanks. God Bless. This is Norma Mercado Burce, her eldest daughter.

  11. Edith GUICO Casequin Acuna said,

    April 28, 2014 at 12:59 am

    Tony Guico recounts: Francisco Guico is married to Agapita Amoranto. Their children are Luis , Jose, Joseifina, Encarnacion, Jose and Rodrigo Guico. So Francisco and Agapita are your great grandparents…Hope I am correct… Regards guys…

  12. mel valenzuela said,

    April 11, 2014 at 2:33 am

    Sir Tony Cuyegkeng,

    Do you have any information regarding petronilo (maestrong eloy) capunitan of san vicente binan laguna and his siblings and lineage?

  13. Mark Jayson Yatco Sutayco said,

    March 25, 2014 at 6:15 am

    Wow! This is very interesting. I’m just searching about my family’s origin (especially my mother’s) and I dropped by on this article. I never thought that most of the Yatcos reside in Laguna. Little that I know about my lolo on my mother’s side is that he is Ezekiel Yatco who married Elena Ching and they are from Caloocan. :-)

  14. Noni Agulto said,

    March 1, 2014 at 3:38 am

    Our condolences to Tito Lito Hocson for the passing of his mother, Mrs Amparo (Amparing) Gana-Hocson last February 25, 2014.

  15. February 27, 2014 at 1:36 am

    Mike:

    No info yet for now. Yes, the Tiongco is an old family from Santa Rosa, Laguna. Also the Zavalla and the Perlas.

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  16. Mike Tiongco said,

    February 26, 2014 at 8:24 pm

    Hi Toto! Any chance you have info to Dalmacio Tiongco got married to Maria Beltran they have a son’s name Valentin Tiongco from Santa Rosa, Laguna but they settled in Guagua, Pampanga …
    Dalmacio Tiongco born around 1760s
    Thanks

  17. rose ann alonte said,

    February 4, 2014 at 3:40 am

    Hi! I am just curious my clan when i read this site. last week when i go to bicol to visit my family i shared what i read because that time our topic is about our relatives and what a coincidence i told them also that i will assign my work in cebu. so, my grandparent told me that his father is from cebu and a family of ALONTE CLAN. Their father died and they never go to cebu to see their relatives, they never attend reunion etc..my lola is josefina gallonosa alonte and her father is apronyano alcantara alonte. I wrote this because my lola said that the present mayor of binan is one of cousin of her father and they actually meet before and for now they have no contact already.

    im just curious for our clan, that’s all.

  18. January 21, 2014 at 11:28 am

    hello po..may kilala po b kaung mga garcia na nagtrabaho dati sa Malacanang Palace?kung may information po kau..pkiemail dito

    erika_tamoria@yahoo.com

    SALAMAT PO :)

  19. Ernani C. Guamen said,

    January 16, 2014 at 7:49 am

    Very interesting reading to be able to relate the history of the old families and heritage structures of Binan during its golden age to what remained today.

    If you have photos of the old Binan, please post them. Many thanks.

  20. Marc Yaptinchay said,

    November 27, 2013 at 1:20 am

    Thanks for the Blog i have always wondered the origins of the family.

  21. Cesar Cariño said,

    October 16, 2013 at 8:10 pm

    Thanks….Michael Potenciano Almendral….for the information update..

  22. Michael Potenciano Almendral said,

    October 15, 2013 at 2:18 am

    According to my mother, the original surname of the first Potenciano in Biñan was Morando (from San Pedro Tunasan) not Arambulo as I previously wrote.

  23. Christopher Yatco said,

    September 22, 2013 at 11:52 am

    Hi Toto , the almedas of binan can be divided into two groups : the kapitana Maria and Andres Almeda group and the Almeda intsik group . The two are not related by blood and much has been said about the Andres Almeda group in this blog. So far there had been no discussions about the Almeda intsiks.

  24. Cezarina Cornejo Alzona said,

    September 6, 2013 at 11:33 am

    I am Cezarina Cornejo Alzona, daughter of Cesar Yatco Alzona (changed his spelling to Caezar). My grandfather is Jose Alzona and grandmother, Adriana Yatco Alzona, both of Calamba, Laguna. Jose’s father and mother were Eugenio Alzona and Filomena Yatco of Binan, Laguna. So as not to be confused with the Cesar Yatco Alzona of Binan. Charles Alzona Mijares must be related to my Uncle Ramon Alzona of Calamba.

    The 14 children of Jose Alzona were:
    from first wife Adriana Punzalan (who died, then he married Adriana Yatco)
    1) Hermogenes Alzona -married Felicidad Cansanay
    2) Alejandro Alzona
    3) Maria Alzona married Protacio Alzona
    4) Agapito Alzona married Herminia Baluyot
    then from Adrian Yatco (who married Jose when she was 15 years old)
    5) Godofredo Alzona
    6) Rosario Alzona married del Mundo
    7) Amando Alzona
    8) Twin of Alzona Amando (died as an infant)
    9) Patrocinio Alzona married Aguto
    10) Ramon Alzona
    11) Purificacion Alzona
    12) Cecilio Alzona a 1st LT died March 21, 1951
    13) Emiliano Alzona died missing in action in WWII about 1942)
    14) Caezar Yatco Alzona (my father born 9-15-25 died 6-27-1997)

    Many descendants of this Alzona family live in the Washington DC area, USA.

  25. Ben Velasco said,

    August 24, 2013 at 1:33 pm

    I was reading a post by Ennie Harrison,from September 25, 2011 at 8:49 am. Harrison mentioned someone named Remedios (Meding) marrying Vicente Manzo. I actually had a great-grandmother whom we called Lola Meding and she was married to Vicente Velasco. Her original surname before marriage was Fernandez. I know that this could just be contradiction though. I do have a question, was it common in the olden days for couples to change into Spanish surnames upon marriage?

  26. Charles Alzona Mijares said,

    August 19, 2013 at 11:39 am

    I am the grandson of Atty. Ramon Yatco Alzona, who hailed from Calamba, Laguna. My wife and I have recently wanted to trace our family tree beyond our grandparents, and I found this (your) wonderful article on “Old Binan Laguna”.
    Please connect with me via email, as I am still wondering about my connection to Laguna, after spending a few months on a gubernatorial campaign there back in 2004.

  27. Thea Vaflor said,

    August 8, 2013 at 4:29 am

    Does anyone have more information about the Zarragas, Marfori or Padua’s of Binan? I am trying to piece together our genealogy for my mom. It would mean a lot to her.

  28. July 23, 2013 at 5:49 am

    I’m a zarraga..that’s my middle name. My late lolo made zarraga slippers in Biñan.

  29. Ester Wolf said,

    January 23, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    Hello,

    In response to Mr. Cuyegkeng’s recent post, just a minor correction, Marciano Garcia was married to Mercedes Arambulo of Calamba, not Flora although she was married to a Garcia as well.

    Also, I would like to credit my great uncle, David A. Garcia (and Family), as the one who took the short black and white film footage of Binan Plaza, circa 1952 that has been posted here and on my youtube channel. It’s been seen by literally thousands. Thank you for the comments on my site and for the inclusion to this site Mr Gonzalez.

    Respectfully,
    Ester Wolf

  30. edgardo v. legasto said,

    January 19, 2013 at 10:52 pm

    The FRIGAILERS CLUB…continuation …during those days before the end of 1956-57 at the perimeter of Rizal Monument – revellers frequented the area before midnight anticipating pyrotechnics shows which we inherited from the chinese eon years ago… during the mentioned period of time many young one”s group also frequented the area – ” WILD CATS( Raul Velarde Faction ), , Chuchu lane ( Lito Hocson & Boy Vasquez faction ) and Seven -eleven boys ( Ruben Yatco & co. ) Free Lancers and Public Boys were there too . And we too , the so called UKULELE Boys …but members of Coilers Club intimidated us … so a near quarrel brewed at the vicinity. The commotion got the attention of then Binan Town Councilor Roberto Malos and scolded all of us and said that instead of bullying each other he adviced us to merge and form a kind of Club which will be useful in the future as he reiterates the famous advocacy of RIZAL ” nasa kabataan ang pag-asa ng bayan ” …and to cut the story short ,,, all of us – UKULELE & Coilers faction agreed to his proposal …and Frigailers Club was founded …. As agreed upon Samuel Salas was our 1st President …and the first ever dance party was held at the residence of then Ms. Rosario Cardinez in sityo Florante .. Thursday February 14 , 1957 …and the said club prospers ’till the present time – and so many guys then joins the club during the passage of time …and Lady Gailerettes was formed and the rest is history ….Hello to all of my buddies and sorry to those whose names isnt mention …to be continued

  31. January 14, 2013 at 12:20 pm

    Yesterday – 13January2013 – as I visited my fb timeline , photos of just concluded Frigailers & Gailerettes reunion was the main feature .. mix emotion engulf me .and yes i was saddened by the fact that i missed the said reunion for it coincides with this year initial meeting / turn over ceremony of in-coming & out-going officers of Pacita 2 A Homeowners Association Inc. of which I was the incoming chairman – 12 January 2013 ,7pm….anyhow as I scrutinize said photos …seeing my unseen buddies for so many long years &.as I observed further – based on provided photo., the Salas bros ; Jake , Sammy and Ernie Ochoa were the only pioneers who founded Frigailers on December 31 , 1956-57 … and some of the male attendee that night joins the club during the succeeding years …and yes during 1956-57 that particular night before the year changes – still vivid from my ageing memory what has transpired during that date .. . Computers isn’t heard of nor cellphones; i-pod ; or loptop ….Seeburg juxebox was the main attraction during that period of time…Elvis Presley’s – Love Me Tender was too popular then eclipsing Platters’ My Prayer as Teresa Brewers” . A Tear Fell was being played ceaselessly to the delight of a group of adolescent teens called UKULELE BOYS – where I was a member and be seen nightly – like the nocturnal bat swarming the perimeter of .Rizal monument of the town plaza of Binan , Laguna from dusk to dawn . The members of UKULELE BOYS were as follows ,- not necessarily in order & * denotes he joined our creator – * Saturnino ( ninoy ) Jimenez Jr. ; * Alfredo ( Chique ) Tan ;Manolito De Matta ; Celestino ( Totoy Puto ) Hernandez , Eduardo ( Engot ) Distor ; Abelardo ( Patat ) Ama * Reynaldo ( Ponyod) Karunungan ; * Manuel ( Payatot ) Padua ; *Jessie Asino ; Totoy Barang Tolosa ; * David Villegas …* Jooger Potenciano and last nut not the least me – Edagrdo ( Bogart ) Legasto … but our perimeter was been invaded by our rival group called Coilers Club and headed by * Danny Arrienda and as i can recall some of them were brothers Jake & Sammy Salas ; Cezar;& * Berting Legasto ( a relative of mine ) Caloy & * Butch Mendiola ; Nelson Jaug ; Romeo Alonde ; Ernie Ochoa ; Amando ( Boogie ) Garcia ; Rosauro Amoranto ; Tony Bejasa ; Toots Mercado and some members of said club which I can’t recall their names …to be continued …

  32. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    December 26, 2012 at 9:37 pm

    Hi Toto,

    Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, and a very Happy Birthday.

    Have been quite busy to pst anything, but rest assured that I do keep track of the postings at the “The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna”.

    On the November 22, 2012 posting of Ester Wolf, It would be noted that David A. Garcia, son of Marciano A. Garcia and Flora Q. Arambulo, married his second cousin, Purisima Francisco Almeda. Pusrisima, was the granddaughter of Eduvijes, married to Higino P. Francisco, the older sister of Catalina, married to Rufino Garcia.

    * * * * *

    Over the years the families of old Biñan had intermarried with one another. Attached is an attempt to trace intermarriages among the Biñan old families and which families have closer ties with one another. The information used in this attempt came from the various contributors to “The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna” (FOBL) web site.

    Some of the individuals mentioned have family names of old Biñan families, as listed in the main section of FOBL, but whose lineage has not been identified in the FOBL. For example, the relationship of Maria Carrillo-Trinidad, the wife of Pablo Yaptinchay, to the Carrillo-Trinidad family of Biñan has not been established. Thus, the name of Maria Carrillo-Trinidad is in “Bold Italics”. For individuals with FOBL acknowledged lineage, such as Pablo Yaptinchay, their names will be in “Bold” letters.

    I hope this attempt will illicit more information from the current descendants of the various Biñan families that will not only expand the composition of various reported family trees, but also identify the lineage of the founding fathers of the families of Old Biñan.

    * * * * *

    As a base, I am using the Yaptinchay family tree as developed by Concepcion “Tita Nena” Yatinchay Zamora. Tita Nena was the great-great-granddaughter of Pablo Yaptinchay and Maria Carrillo-Trinidad, being was the eldest daughter of Agustin Alberto Yaptinchay and Francisca Amoranto, youngest son of Guido Gana Yaptinchay and Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto.

    I believe the family tree information organized by Tita Nena was based on the data sheet submitted by the members of the various branches of the Yaptinchay clan for grand reunion held last June 27, 1998 at Ayala Alabang Village, Muntinlupa City.

    Best regards.

    Tony

    **********************************************************************************************************
    ( The following is a fantastic summary, analysis, and commentary on the genealogies of the Yaptinchay, Yatco, Carrillo-Trinidad, Gana, et. al. families by Mr. Antonio Casas Cuyegkeng. Thank you very much, Tony!!! This is a great piece of research!!! — Toto Gonzalez )

    ANCESTOR

    Yap Tin Chay was probably born in Xiamen, Fujian province, China and brought to the Philippines by an older brother, who was a (magtitimon) rower of a Chinese vessel bound for Manila, as a very young child. Because of his age and youthful appearance, Chiquito was registered as son to his older brother, this being the easiest way to bring him into the country From then on Tin Chay Yap was said to have been adopted by Intramuros friars, probably Agustinians, because during the time the Yap brothers arrived in the Philippines, Biñan was still part of the Augustinian Province (Noni Agulto 02/15/10).

    He was baptized Pablo Yaptinchay (Cesar Cariño 10/23/10) and got married to Maria Carrillo-Trinidad.

    While the Carrillo-Trinidad family is a prominent family in Biñan, the ancestry of Maria Carrillo-Trinidad is unknown.

    The Carrillo-Trinidad family found at the OFBL originated with the marriage of Romana Asuncion y Santa Ana of Santa Cruz, Manila, to Andres Carrillo-Trinidad of Biñan, Laguna (Sonny Rayos 06/11/10). At a later stage, the Carrillo-Trinidad family name disappeared in Biñan as the Biñan Carrillo’s dropped the Trinidad after an incident, probably with the prominent Carrillo-Trinidad’s in neighboring Carmona, Cavite (Noni Agulto 02/15/10).

    Pablo and Maria Yaptinchay had three (3) children. The eldest, Alberto, born in 1822, married Macaria Reyes Gana, Simeona married Miguel Gomes Yatco, and the youngest, Isabel married Pedro Basedilla Guico (Cesar Cariño 10/23/10).

    FIRST GENERATION – YAPTINCHAY

    Macaria Roberta Gana, wife of Alberto, was a member of what seems to be the oldest family in old Biñan. Macaria was the granddaughter of Vicente Tang-Gana with his first wife, Gertudes De Los Reyes. There is no record has to when and why Vicente dropped “Tang” from the family’s surname. Vicente and Gertudes Tang-Gana had only one child, Gaspar, who married Gertrudes Santimora Roberta of Chinese descent (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11). Macaria was the 5th child of Gaspar and Gertudes Gana.

    Miguel Gomes Yatco, husband of Simeona, was the eldest son of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes. However, in the research of Dr. Leoncio (Tito Leony) Gana Yatco, his name was Aniceto Yatco (Cesar Cariño 06/06/11).

    Vicente Tang Gana was assumed to be a 1st generation Chinese immigrant from China like Yap Tin Chay (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11). Vicente could be 1 generation ahead of Yap Tin Chay, or of the same generation but ages apart. Of the same generation as Yap Tin Chay were Andres Carillo –Trinidad and Marcos Dimas Yatco. Unlike Yap Tin Chay, the ancestry of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Andres Carrillo-Trinidad are unknown (Noni Agulto 08/16/11).

    There is no further entry on the ancestry of Pedro Basedilla Guico, husband of Isabel, except that he is the son of Luis Guico and Josefa Basedilla.

    SECOND GENERATION – ALBERTO CT. YAPTINCHAY

    Alberto Carillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Macaria Roberta Gana had eight (8) children.
    The 1998 Yaptinchay tree did not contain any descendant for Julia, the eldest; the second child and eldest son, Andres; and the 5th child, Raymunda. The list simply said that Julia Yaptinchay married Cirilo Carlos, Andres Yaptinchay married Teodora Zavalla and Raymunda Yaptinchay married Ramon Ocampo. Daughters Bibiana Yaptinchay, the 6th child, and Josefa Yaptinchay, the 7th, never got married.
    The ancestry of Ramon Ocampo, husband of Raymunda, and is unknown.

    Guido, the 3rd child and 2nd son, married Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto and they had 9 children.

    The roots of Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto was a descendant of the daughter of Dona Isabel Alberto de Sanchez, sister of Lorenzo Alejandro Alberto, married to Brigida de Quintos, and parents of the mother of the hero Jose Alonzo Rizal. They are the children of Cypriano and Maria Florentina Alejandro Alberto (Noni Agulto 08/19/11).

    After Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto passed away, the widower, Guido, had a relationship, first with Nicolasa Garcia, with whom he had 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls, all surnamed Garcia. The said relationship was followed by a liaison with Catalina Sta. Ana Medel, with whom Guido had 4 children, 1 boy and 3 girls, all surnamed Medel. Guido’s last partner was Isidra C. Bergonia, with whom he had 3 children, 1 boy and 2 girls, all surnamed Agulto (Nonie Agulto 04/16/10).

    The 2nd daughter, Maria, more commonly known as (Kapitang Maria), married Andres Ponce Almeda. Andres and Maria Almeda had 5 children. However, according to Cesar Cariño (08/16/11) there was another daughter, for a total of 6 children.

    While the Almeda family is a prominent family in Biñan, nothing else is known about the ancestry Andres Ponce Almeda., except for his being the son of Antonio Almeda and Maria Dolores Ponce.

    The oldest Almeda in the web were from Pedro Paterno’s listing of Biñan leaders (alcalde, kapitan or gobernadorcillo) from 1757-1898. The list included 1851 – Don Lazaro Almeda Carlos; 1854 – Don Jose Almeda Carlos; and 1858-59 – Don Agaton Almeda Carlos. The fourth Almeda in the list, Don Andres Almeda, was for Kapitan in 1888 (Nonie Agulto 04/13/10). Considering the period involved was during the Spanish regime, could they be using the Spanish name format? If yes, then the names should have been written as “Almeda y Carlos”.

    The youngest child and son, Pablo, married Leonila Mercado Yatco, a first cousin of the national hero Jose Alonzo Rizal (Cesar Cariño 08/01/10).

    Leonila Mercado Yatco is a descendant of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes. Her grandfather, Gregorio, is the youngest brother of Miguel Gomes Yatco, the husband of Simeona Carillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay. Her mother, Bonifacia Alejandra Mercado, was the older sister of Francisco Engracio Alejandro Rizal-Mercado married to Teodora De Quintos Alonzo Realonda, the father of Jose Alonzo Rizal (Antonio Cuyegkeng 09/08/11).

    THIRD GENERATION – ALBERTO CT. YAPTINCHAY

    Of the 9 children of Guido and Agustina Yaptinchay, only one was a girl, the 3rd child, Albina, who never got married (Nonie Agulto 06/01/10).

    Of the 8 sons, there were no mention about their families, except that the eldest, Felix Yaptinchay, got married to Josefa C. Gana, the 2nd, Francisco Yaptinchay, married Josefa Carrillo Trinidad, the 5th, Isidro Yaptinchay, married Francisca Morando, and the 8th child, Librado (Privado) Yaptinchay, was assumed to have remained single.

    The ancestry of Josefa C. Gana, wife of Felix, and Josefa Carrillo Trinidad, wife of Francisco are unknown.

    The 4th child, Agapito Yaptinchay, married Avelina (Belen) Luna from Malabon and had 4 children.

    Miguel Yaptinchay, the 6th child, married Maria Mateo. They had an only child, Guillermo.

    The 7th child, Alberto Yaptinchay, married Milagros Marfori, had 5 children.

    The youngest, Agustin Yaptinchay, married Francisca Amoranto and had 2 daughters.

    Andres Almeda and Kapitang Maria Almeda had 5 or 6 children. The 1998 Yaptinchay tree showed no other information on the eldest child, Rosenda, other than her marrying Macario Carrillo. As to the 3rd daughter, Meruacion, born around 1895, and married to Timoteo de Mesa (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11), she was never mentioned in any family gatherings of the children of Kapitang Maria.

    The ancestry of Macario Carrillo, husband of Rosenda Almeda, is unknown.

    The second child Encarnacion married Francisco Concepcion Casas from Manila.

    The eldest son, Antonio married Ricarda Sta. Ana Medel.

    Esteban married Lazara Sabas.

    Raymunda married Mariano S. Cruz Yatco.

    Mariano S. Cruz Yatco, a descendant of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes, was the 6th child of Leoncio Asuncion Yatco and Ysidora Faustorino Cruz. His grandfather, Ignacio Gomes Yatco, married to Valentina Sta. Ana Asuncion, was the younger brother of the husband of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay, Miguel Gomes Yatco.

    His grandmother, Valentina Sta. Ana Asuncion, was the eldest sister of Romana Asuncion y Santa Ana who married Andres Carrillo-Trinidad that started the known Carrillo-Trinidad line in Binan, Laguna.

    Pablo and Leonila Yaptinchay had 8 children. There were no indications as to whether the daughter, Trinidad, and the son, Alberto, got married or remained single. The eldest, Francisco, married Anita Cartegna, while the 2nd son, Francisco married Amparo De Los Reyes. The 4th child, Isidro married Josefina Salterio Yatco, and daughter, Tita married Hermenegildo La’O. Macaria got married to Eliseo Abad and youngest daughter, Flora, married Teodoro Evangelista, Sr.

    The ancestry of Josefina Salterio Yatco, wife of Isidro Yaptinchay, is unknown.

    FOURTH GENERATION – ALBERTO CT. YAPTINCHAY

    By the 4th generation, probably due to greater mobility and better educational opportunities, marriage between the families became less.

    Of the children of Agapito and Avelina Yaptinchay, 2 married into old Biñan families. The eldest, Angel, married Rafaela Toribio Gana .

    Rafaela Toribio Gana was a 5th generation of descendant of Vicente Tang-Gana with his second wife, Tomasa Apolonia. Her great grandfather, Eulalio Apolonia Gana, married Florentina Potenciano. However, ancestry of Florentina Potenciano is unknown. The ancestry of her grandmother, Filomena Ocampo, wife of Eduardo Potenciano Gana, is also unknown.

    The eldest daughter, Leticia, married Leoncio Gana Yatco.

    Leoncio Gana Yatco was a 4th generation descendant of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes. His great grandfather, Ignacio, was the 5th child of Marcos and Maria, Dimas Yatco, and married to Valentina Sta. Ana Asuncion (See Marcos S. Cruz Yatco above.). His father, Jose S., married Generosa Cruz Gana, is the older brother of Mariano S., husband of Raymunda Yaptinchay Almeda,

    Generosa Cruz Gana was the daughter of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana with his first wife. Crisanta Cruz. Jesualdo Potenciano Gana was the younger brother of Eduardo Potencaino Gana (See above.).

    None of the grand children of Andres and Maria Almeda and Pablo and Leonila Yaptinchay married into an old Biñan family, except for Ma. Paz Almeda Casas.

    Ma. Paz Almeda Casas married Ramon Gana Mercado. However, the ancestry of Mariano Mercado and Romana Gana, parents of Ramon Gana Mercado, are unknown. Mariano Mercado was supposed to have been from Malabon.

    SECOND GENERATION – SIMEONA CT. YAPTINCHAY YATCO

    Of the children of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Miguel Gomes Yatco, only the only son, Fermin, married into an old Biñan family.

    Fermin Yaptinchay Yatco married Pertonilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad and they had 9 children. However, the marriage did not last. Pertonilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad became the 2nd spouse of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana. Fermin “married” Paulina Rosales.

    Pertonilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad was the eldest child of Andres Carrillo-Trinidad and Romana Sta. Ana Asuncion (See above.).

    Jesualdo Potenciano Gana was the second son of Eulalio Apolonia Gana married to Florentina Potenciano. Eulalio was the eldest child of Vicente Tan-Gana and his second wife, Tomasa Apolonia,.

    The ancestry of Florentina Potenciano, wife of Eulalio Apolonia Gana, is unknown.

    The eldest daughter of Miguel and Simeona Yatco, Petrona, married a Rotea. Daughters Pascaula and Maria married the brothers Lazaro and pablo Velasco, respectively. The 3rd daughter, Teodora Angela married Juanito (Jacinto) Alzona, and the youngest, Nicolasa, married Andres Laseano.

    After Fermin and Petronilla Yatco, no descendants of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Miguel Gomes Yatco have been noted to have married into definitely identifiable members of families named in the main section of FOBL.

    SECOND GENERATION – ISABEL CT. YAPTINCHAY GUICO

    Isabel Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay and Pedro Basedilla Guico had 3 children. The eldest of Anastacio married Macaria Mercado Rizal.

    The 2nd son, Faustino, or Florentino per Cesar Cariño (Nonie Agulto 02/21/11), married Miguela Gana Carrillo, while the youngest, Fernando, married Agapita Gana Carrillo.

    Miguela Gana Carrillo, wife of Faustino, and Agapita Gana Carrillo, wife of Fernando, were first cousins.

    Miguela’s mother, Francisca, was the elder sister of Donata, the mother of Agapita. They were children on Gaspar De Los Reyes Gana with his first wife, Gertrudes Santimora Roberta (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11). While Donata used Roberta as a middle name, most of the records show that Francisca, Macaria, and Ceferina used Reyes as their middle name (Cesar Cariño 09/23/10). Macaria Reyes Gana was the wife of Alberto Carillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay (See above.), while Ceferina Reyes Gana was the wife of Macario Ricardo Arevalo Potenciano, the eldest son Jose Potenciano and Micaela Arevalo.

    The ancestries of Juan Carrillo-Trinidad, husband of Francisca Reyes Gana, and Ambrosio Carrillo, husband of Donata Roberta Gana are unknown. The relationship between Juan Carrillo-Trinidad and Ambrosio Carrillo have also not been established.

    THIRD GENERATION – ISABEL CT. YAPTINCHAY GUICO

    No children of Anastacio and Macaria Yaptinchay Guico married into members of families named in the main section of FOBL. There is no information as to the children of Fernando and Agapita Yaptinchay Guico

    Florentino and Miguela Yaptinchay Guico has 3 children. The eldest child, Isidra, married Ignacio Almeda Yatco.

    Ignacio Almeda Yatco, husband of Isidra Carrillo Guico, is the grandson of Igancio Gomes Yatco and Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion. Igancio was the younger brother of Miguel Gomes Yatco, husband of Simeona Carrillo-Trinidad Yaptinchay (See above.). The parents of Ignacio were Jose “Coseng” Asuncion Yatco and Victoria Custodio Almeda. The ancestry of Victoria Custodio Almeda is unknown.

    The second daughter, Maria, married Fernando C. Belizario.

    The first wife of the only son, Eduardo, was Leonila Potenciano Lopez-De Leon. The second wife was Guillerma E. Evasco.

    Leonila Potenciano Lopez-De Leon, first wife of Eduardo, was the daughter of Isidra Gana Potenciano and Mariano Trinidad Lopez de Leon, and great granddaughter of Jose Potenciano and Micaela Arevalo and Vicente Tang-Gana and his second wife, Tomasa Apolonia.

    After Eduardo and Leonila Guico, no descendants been noted to have married into definitely identifiable members of families named in the main section of FOBL.

  33. December 3, 2012 at 7:43 am

    I really have a vague understanding of where i came from… I just know that my grandmother’s parents were Guillermo Almendral married to a Gonzales i’m not sure of the name if Generosa. My grandfather came from Reyes and changed to Arcega. More than a century ago, my grandmother had acquired our property in San Antonio Binan Laguna where our old house is.

  34. Ester Wolf said,

    November 22, 2012 at 8:55 pm

    Addition to #46 Reply by Rene Resurreccion dated November 13, 2011:

    #8 Catalina R. Almeda + Rufino Garcia
    A) Juan A. Garcia + Teodora Medina
    1) Jesus M. Garcia + Belen Mercado
    2) Trinidad M. Garcia — single
    3) Salud M. Garcia [b. 1901-1989] + Ciriaco Bagabaldo [b. 1894-1967]

    B) Constancia A. Garcia + Fernando Ama
    C) Sergia A. Garcia* [b. 1880-?] + Miguel Zarraga [b. 1888-?]
    D) Damiana A. Garcia + Lutero Zarraga
    1) Digna G. Zarraga — single
    2) Gregorio G. Zarraga + Nena Evangelista
    E) Ramona A. Garcia + Vicente Garcia
    1) Amado G. Garcia + Lilian ???? (1st wife); Candida Lopez de Leon (2nd wife)
    [Notes was not clear on whether Amado married twice, the names were attached to his]
    2) Conrado G. Garcia + Flora Q. Arambulo
    F) Marciano A. Garcia + Mercedes E. Arambulo
    1) Catalina A. Garcia + Benjamin C. Almeda
    2) David A. Garcia + Purisima F. Almeda
    G) Teodoro A. Garcia + Lencio Silva
    1) Cezar G. Silva + Natividad Bedia
    2) Luna G. Silva + Eser Kasunuran
    —-

    If family notes are accurate, Catalina would be my great-great Grandmother. My grandmother was Catalina A. Garcia.

    Best regards & Happy Holidays!
    Ester Wolf

  35. nancy mapili said,

    November 18, 2012 at 7:14 pm

    hello…just want to ask..if the Almarinez clan originally from binan?Because i’m 1 of the grand-grand daughter..

  36. Dan august Oro said,

    September 28, 2012 at 2:23 pm

    Hi. I was interested with your history. I was trying to search my roots who according to my adopted parents I am an almeda. I should like to ask if you have any knowldege of a certain Tomas Almeda II who according to my adopted parents is the name of my real father. I wanted to trace my real roots and this is the only lead I got. I even dont know my real name. If you have any knowledge please e-mail me at danaugust_oro@yahoo.com. Thanks po!!!

  37. Noni Agulto said,

    August 29, 2012 at 3:25 am

    Welcome Marc! enjoy reading =)

  38. C. Perez said,

    August 26, 2012 at 2:04 pm

    P.s. i should have given this along with my first comment:
    Andres Carrillo married to Romana Asuncion-Carrillo… one of their children, Josefa, married Engracio Quintos. Josefa and Engracio had 7 children named:
    1) Domingo Quintos who married Segunda Custodio;
    2) Isidra Quintos, who married Ernest M. Criss;
    3) Leonila Quintos, who married Mariano Syyap;
    4) Maria Quintos, who married Antonio Soriano;
    5) Eduarda Quintos, who married Enrique Lopez;
    6) Teodora Quintos, who married Fulgencio Borromeo; and finally
    7) Jose Quintos, who married Luz Borromeo (Fulgencio was her brother).
    My grandmother, Isidra Quintos and her American husband had 5 daughters named Alicia Minerva Criss, Maria Eloisa Criss, Mary Paz Criss, Nellie Criss, and Virginia Ernestine.

  39. C. Perez said,

    August 26, 2012 at 1:53 pm

    Thank you for this very interesting article. It was from this article that i was able to get a lot of information about my ancestors. Great grandmother was Romana Asuncion-Carrillo. Her daughter, Josefa married, Engracio Quintos and they had 7 children, one of whom was my grandmother, Isidra Quintos.

  40. Marc Yaptinchay said,

    August 21, 2012 at 8:50 am

    Finally a family tree I can study.Hi to all family members (the ones ive met and to the ones I have not)

  41. Marc Yaptinchay said,

    August 21, 2012 at 8:34 am

    I just foun out about the site. Finally a family tree to know our roots. Hi to the fam I know and to the ones I havnt met yet.

  42. June 3, 2012 at 12:23 am

    Hello . . . my name is ARMIE ALZONA DE LOS REYES – VELAS. I am a grandaughter of PACIFICO (Pacito) ALZONA – a policeman of Binan, Laguna in the ’40s and early ’50s. He had five children with Lucia Tanael+ — Milagros+ married to a Ponce+ from Ilocos; Luzviminda married to Ben de los Reyes+ from Naujan, Oriental Mindoro; Aurora (Orit)+ married to Ernesto Sevilla+ with children residing in San Joseph, Binan; Reynaldo+ married to Elena from Ilocos and now still residing in San Joseph with four children; and Nora married to Roberto Papa from Bicol with four children residing in San Joseph.

    Our grandfather had other children: Mila Alzona married to a Dimayuga from Lipa, Batangas and Nesty Alzona, married and residing in de la Paz Binan; and some other children now deceased.

    I wish to get in touch with our family and relatives as most of our cousins with Aunt Milagros+ are now based in Honolulu, Hawaii and California. Aunt Milagros children are: Erlyn, Edith, Edgar, Echie, Emily, Jr., Elory, Edwin, Elaiza, and Elektrolita or Ally.

    My Mom Luzviminda, now a widow residing in Sikatuna Village, QC has eleven children: me, Armie married to Romualdo Villar Velas of Paracale, Camarines Norte; Picie+, Navie married to Gen. Mariano Velora from Alaminos, Pangasinan; Louie+, Ben Jr. married to Suzette Gaba from Naujan, Oriental Mindoro; Victoria+, Ric married to Mona Cortazar from San Pedro, Laguna; Pol married to Adona Comia from Naujan, Oriental Mindoro; Roy married to Rowena Santos from Pasig City; Lubar married to Sol from Bulacan; and Luvie married to Mary Ann from Bulacan.

    Thanks to this site for I can now trace my roots. More power !!!

  43. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    May 16, 2012 at 7:17 pm

    Hi Toto,

    Just some comments on the recent postings in the Binan site.

    regards.

    Tony

    ************************************

    GERMAN

    Many thanks Ed for the additional info on your family. However, without the middle names of your grandparents, it is difficult to go further. The only other German in the The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna file is Jose German, who was alkalde in 1841 (Noni Agulto 04/13/10).

    ALMEDA

    Many thanks Lucy for the reply. Considering that this site, The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna, has developed into a depository of historical information on Biñan and the families that shaped the town, it will appreciated if the clarificatory information on the Almeda family tree that you and Ed Padlan have resolved can be shared with the rest of the site contributors.

    CARRILLO

    Teddy Vera Cruz (04/0712) introduced the website containing the Jacinto Carrillo family as prepared by the uncle, Bienvenido Vera Cruz, and maintained by Chito Carrillo. The website information supports the comment of Jess Vera Cruz (10/06/10), that Joaquin Carrillo and family settled in Kalilayan (now Unisan), Tayabas (now Quezon).

    As previously mentioned (Sonny Rayos 06/11/10), the parents of Joaquin Carrillo were Andres Carrillo-Trinidad and Romana Santa Ana Asuncion. Not much is known about the lineage of Andres Carrillo-Trinidad. However, Romana Santa Ana Asuncion traces her roots to the Molo-Paterno and the Kagalitan-Asuncion families of Sta. Cruz, Manila (Antonio Cuyegkeng 07/06/11).

    However, the tree by Bienvenido Vera Cruz only starts with Joaquin Carrillo and his siblings.

    According to Bienvenido Vera Cruz, Joaquin Carrillo had only 4 siblings, Angela, Hipolito, Anicia and Titkio, which could be Eutiquio (Sonny Rayos 06/12/10).

    However, Sonny Rayos (06/11/10), initially named 6 siblings of Joaquin, then corrected it on June 12, 2010, which had Ramona Asuncion Carillo Trinidad having 8 children (not siblings as posted). The children were Petronila, who first married Fermin Yaptinchay Yatco, then, became the second wife of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana (Antonio Cuyegkeng 07/06/11); Josefa married to Engracio Quintos; Joaquin; Eutiquio, who could be the Titkio; Angela married to a gentleman surnamed Eugenio; Irene; Filomena married to a gentleman surnamed Castrillo; and Anicia married Hipolito Habacon, not Abacon.

    Considering the above, how many siblings did Joaquin Carrillo really have, 3 or 7? Being the son of Andres Carrillo-Trinidad and Romana Santa Ana Asuncion, when did Joaguin drop “Trinidad” from his surname and why?

    It would be interesting to know when and why Joaquin Carrillo stopped using the surname Carrillo-Trinidad. Hopefully, it will shed light on the incident that caused the Binan Carrillos’ to drop Trinidad from their surname. Was the incident related somehow with the Carrillos that were prominent (concurrently that time) in neighboring Carmona, Cavite (Noni Agulto 02/15/10)?

    POTENCIANO

    Dr. Conrado Garcia Potenciano, who inherited the “Tercera Caida” from his mother Feliza Garcia (Enrique Bustos 02/240), married Rufina Reyes. Dr. Conrado and Rufina Potenciano had several children, a son, Victor, married Irma Ponce-Enrile, and a daughter, Lourdes, married Nicanor Padilla.

  44. Earl Ravelo said,

    April 27, 2012 at 12:05 pm

    To sir Antonio C. Cuyugkeng:
    thanks.. glad to hear from you..
    i’m sorry sir, i don’t know their middle names (of Mariano German and Matea Rivera) as of now..all i know is that they have several children named:
    Potenciana Rivera German (1851-Nov. 29, 1931) married to Celedonio Abas (1860-June 29, 1928)
    Cesario Rivera German (1857- March 24, 1932) married to Filomena Neri Sanchez and then to Justa Quintero La Victoria
    Primitivo Rivera German married to ??? Ortiz
    Tiburcio Rivera German (1866-????) married to Leoncia Malinao (1884-????)
    other children not yet known…
    the German from Cagayan de Oro, Ozamiz, Oroqueta, Butuan are related. Ancestors of the German from Butuan were from Leyte. It was told that a certain German from Biñan migrated to Cebu, then one offspring moved to Leyte (Maripipi). Some settled in Cagayan de Misamis and Oroqueta and Ozamis (former Misamis)..
    that’s all i know from now sir…
    hope to hear from you soon..
    thanks..

    earl :)

  45. Lucy francisco borromeo said,

    April 26, 2012 at 4:02 pm

    Tony,

    Rene Resurreccion is the authority on the Francisco-Almeda family tree, which gets rather confusing due to the numerous intermarriages. He is the grandson of Irene Francisco Almeda vda de Resurreccion. I hope you find all the answers to your questions!

    Regards,
    Lucy

  46. Lucy francisco borromeo said,

    April 26, 2012 at 3:50 pm

    Tony, Ed Padlan has been communicating with me via email, and we clarified the conflicting info regarding the Almeda family tree. I can forward it to you if you want. Can you give your email address?

  47. Jose Victor G. Gonzalez said,

    April 20, 2012 at 3:57 am

    Tony,

    Nice to hear from you. From your drinking teacher.

    Regards,

    JoeVic

  48. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    April 17, 2012 at 12:19 pm

    Hi Toto,

    Belated Happy Easter. Hope you had a wonderful and holy Easter holiday.

    Attached is an update on the Almedas’ that I came to by chance during the wake of my brother-in-law.

    Best regards.

    Tony

    ************************************

    GERMAN
    Earl Ravelo, it would help is you can provide the middle name, that is the family name of the mother, of your grandfather, Mariano German married to Matea Rivera, as well as identifying his siblings. The middle name of your grandmother will also help.

    To-date, all we have identified that the father of former Judge Milagros German was Fernando German married to Agrifina Amoranto (Cesar Cariño 02/19/11). This makes Judge Milagros German a fifth generation Gana from line of Tomasa Apolonia, the second wife of Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana (Antonio Cuyegkeng 08/07/11).

    Rina Gana-Telen (02/09/11) had been asked to expound more on the ancestry of her grandfather Agapito German Gana, considering that Ciriaco Potenciano Gana, married 2 German’s, Leonarda and Francisca, but, there is no mention as to whether Leonarda and Francisca are related. However, we have not yet received any response from Rina.

    ALMEDA

    On the last week of December, I had the opportunity to seat with Augusto (Jake) Almeda Lopez at a wake. During the course of the conversation we got to be talking about the families of Biñan and Tito Jake said that his Almeda heritage is from Sta. Rosa, Laguna. In any case, I requested if he could provide me with a copy of his Almeda lineage. To help, I sent him the Almeda file I made for the Old Families of Biñan, Laguna site.

    Tito Jake is the son of Manuel Gomez Almeda married to Severina Martinez Lerma. According to Rene Resurreccion (11/13/11), is grandparents were Pablo Rubio Almeda and Petrona Gomez. Pablo was the 6th child of Jose Carlos Almeda (Jose I) married to Bernabela Rubio.

    From Tito Jake’s response, I was able to relate the Almeda commentaries of Resurreccion (11/13/11), Lucy Francisco Borromeo (11/01/11), and Eduardo Agustin Padlan (11/01/11), who happens to be the nephew of Tito Jake, being the son of his cousin Aida Almeda Agustin, daughter of Rosario Lerma Almeda married to Agustine Agustine.

    I am waiting for Tito Jake to return to clarify conflicting information from Resurreccion, Borromeo, and Padlan.

    The question is whether Manuel Gomez Almeda has a brother named Leon, a sister that married a Francisco, and another sister married to a Toledo from Cavite.

    Consider the following:

    1. According to Padlan (11/01/11), Leon had a daughter name Irene, who married a Resurrecion. However, both Borromeo (11/01/11) and Resurreccion (11/13/11) identified Irene Francisco Almeda as the daughter of Fausta Francisco and Jose Mendoza Almeda III and granddaughter of Eduviges Rubio Almeda, older sister of Pablo Rubio Almeda, and Higino Prospero Francisco.

    If Borromeo (11/01/11) and Resurreccion (11/13/11) are correct, Irene, who married Leon Resurreccion from Pampanga, is the cousin of Tito Jake, who regularly visited him, Tito Jake, in Camp Crame during martial law.

    2. According to Padlan (11/01/11), the sister, who married a Francisco, had 3 daughters, one of which was called Lucia, and none of whom married.

    Per Resurreccion (11/13/11), there was a spinster called Lucia Almeda Francisco, the adoptive mother of Higino Almeda Resurreccion-Francisco, who had 2 other sisters, Estefania and Escolastica, who, also, never married (Borromeo – 11/01/11). However, their parents were Eduviges Rubio Almeda and Higino Prospero Francisco, not Manuel Gomez Almeda married to Severina Martinez Lerma.

    3. According to Padlan (11/01/11), another sister married a Toledo, and settled in Silang, Cavite.

    However, Resurreccion and Borromeo do not mention any Almeda getting married to a Toledo and settling in Cavite.

  49. April 13, 2012 at 5:04 am

    Hi! Reading all the stories way back is truly magnificent. My father is CARLOS “CARLITO” ALON YATCO married to FELICIDAD “IDAD” Carrera SISON who used to be a textile/RTW vendor in Binan Public Market. My father was known for his “machoness”. He got REAL muscles, indeed! I just wished i had pictures of the old days but all of them was damaged by the flood years ago. He was from San Jose (San Joseph, to few) in downtown Binan. My lolo is Francisco “Kikoy” Yatco married to Luz Alon. I’ll try to reconstruct some stories with the help of my Aunt and will post the soonest…

  50. April 13, 2012 at 5:00 am

    Reblogged this on maricaryatco24 and commented:
    Hi! Reading all the stories way back is truly magnificent. My father is CARLOS “CARLITO” ALON YATCO married to FELICIDAD “IDAD” Carrera SISON who used to be a textile/RTW vendor in Binan Public Market. My father was known for his “machoness”. He got REAL muscles, indeed! I just wished i had pictures of the old days but all of them was damaged by the flood years ago. He was from San Jose (San Joseph, to few) in downtown Binan. My lolo is Francisco “Kikoy” Yatco married to Luz Alon. I’ll try to reconstruct some stories with the help of my Aunt and will post the soonest…

  51. Teddy Vera Cruz said,

    April 7, 2012 at 6:06 pm

    Hi! Here’s the url address of the family history of the Carrillos of Unisan, Quezon. It seems that the url my brother Jess mentioned no longer exists. This family history was written by my late uncle Bienvenido Vera Cruz and explains how the Andres – Romana Carrillo Trinidad branch of the family from Binan ended up settling down in Unisan, Quezon:

    http://www.reocities.com/sallycarrillo/carrillo/

  52. Earl Ravelo said,

    March 30, 2012 at 9:02 am

    hi! i really love reading this site..anyway, i’m from cagayan de oro..but we have a German roots from Biñan..i hope someone can post the German family tree and history here also..my great great great great grandfather is Mariano German whose ancestors were believed to be from Biñan. his wife is Matea Rivera. they were born around 1820s-1830s..thanks.. hope to hear from all of you here soon..thanks.. :) :)

  53. Zaldy Alora said,

    March 17, 2012 at 3:04 pm

    My father Angeles Almario Alora who is 92 yo of Santo Domingo, Binan, Laguna is the son of Dalmacio Cangco Alora of San Jose. My grandfather’s mother is Agapita Alora. I dont have much information about my great grandmother. My grandmother is Antonina Mance Alora from San Vicente but her mother was originally from San Antonio. My tatay has 4 siblings. They are Victorino Alora, 90yo, Nicanor Alora, 88yo (RIP) and Margarita Alora-Nava. My mother is Lina delos santos Sarmiento, originally from Dela Paz. Her mother is Rosa delos Santos. We are related to the Legasto, Cangco, Mance, Alon, Belizario, delos Santos, Sarmiento and Realon

  54. edgardo v. legasto said,

    February 7, 2012 at 2:09 am

    From: Edgardo Legasto
    To: “tabyong729@yahoo.com”
    Sent: Monday, February 6, 2012 6:01 PM
    Subject: erratum .

    an open letter for the readers of this website …. Allow me to begin that though sometimes it’s quite difficult for us accepting self error(s) , i found myself facing that embarrassing situation. . . and for this . . . I ought to correct my mistake(s) so as not to gave wrong information for future reader to be of … ” The Families of Old Binan ” website …. an error occurred & I excerpt portion of my stated contribution where I erred . . . ” to wit ” – Edgardo Legasto said,October 29, 2011 at 7:02 am ., , , ” During the mentioned period of time – two adjacent semi circular spanish fortress stand at the front of the old Church ( its the parking area today) ..We played hide & seek to said ” bantayan ” w/my playmates – & to named some Cezar & Roberto Legasto ; ; Gabriel de Matta Belizario ; Saturnino Jimanez jr ;Vicente Vasquez ;; Manolito de Matta ; Fidel Espinosa ;;Abelardo Ama ; Mariano Lopez de Leon ;Boy Evangelista ; Reynaldo Karunungan a certain BOY AGULTO and if i include more of my playmates – i think I can add more than a hundreds of them ….Yes said adobe structured edifice – which measured approximately 40 meters in diameter 6 meters in height and at the entrance has had a spiral stairways going up to the top was torn down due to town plaza re-alignment during the Mayorship of Hon.Jesus Garcia … The error is about the ” 40 meters in diameter 6 meters in height ……. What I intend to write – about approximate measurement of said two adjacent semi circular spanish fortress must be … ” its circumference was 40 meters “… not diameter …. and by the way …allow me to add some fact regarding me – but pls never thought i am making a decent excuse … I belonged to those numerous millions who hadn’t graduated high school … Taken 4th year h.s. at three consecutive years ( Sta. Catalina de Binan , Lake Shore H.S. & Arellano H.S. ) … very poor on any math subjects … Geometry , Algebra , Physics etc. … and was lucky if my teacher gave me 65 grade ….my english grade was fair at 75 … so in sincerest way correct me if i’m wrong … tnx ….hello TOTO

  55. cynthia z. gana said,

    February 6, 2012 at 1:29 pm

    It is an amazement to come across this blog and the enthusiasm to read every exchange is great that I decided to participate. I am Cynthia Gana – 6TH generation of Don Jose Tang Gana- 2nd child of Don Vicente Tang Gana , brother of Don Eulalio, Dona Petrona and Don Roman to the mother Tomasa and half brother of Don Gaspar Tang Gana.

    Don Jose Tang Gana married to Regina Marabillas Custodio bore 7 children :
    1. Isabel married Maximo Amoranto
    2. Maria married Gaspar Medina of Silang,Cavite
    3. Jose married Juana Medina- sister of Gaspar-husband of Maria Gana /Silang,Cavite
    4. Miguel married Felipa Dimaranan
    5.Agustin married Concha
    6 Mariano married Justa Rianzares
    7. Rosa married Primo Carillo

    I belong to the line of Jose Gana and Juana Medina and though my generation could already be from the younger ones, the fascination to know my roots is overwhelming that when the opportunity to be part of the organizing group for the reunion of the Descendants of Don Vicente Tang Gana arises, I embraced it with so much dedication and passion.

    When the late Tita Baby Almazan (from the line of Miguel Gana (the 4th child of Don Jose among the seven children)and Felipa Dimaranan) who headed the reunion organizing group then, handed me a copy of the file for the names and families that rooted from Don Vicente, I glanced and studied every details with so much ardour.

    Overwhelmed with how the family have grown to many years of generation, painstakingly I made an outline that would easily be digested by the young and old generations of the clan.

    To offer accuracy, the information was also validated to the hand-outs given by Tita Feling Gana Yaptichay- the 2nd child among the 4 daughters of Don Filomeno O. Gana (the 5th child among the 5 children of Don Eduardo Gana -eldest son of Don Eulalio-the eldest child among the 4 children of Don Vicente Tang Gana and Tomasa) namely Amparo Gana married to Dionisio Hocson , Norberta Gana married to Higino Francisco and Tomasa Gana married to Nestor Gana Yatco- son of Generosa Gana(daughter of Don Jesualdo) and Jose P. Yatco. Tita ; married to Angel Yaptinchay- the grandson of Guido Gana Yaptinchay- eldest child of Macaria Gana(the 5th child of Don Gaspar) and Alberto Yaptinchay.

    Now, I could offer no historical information but I could share the family tree outlined to a form that could easily be appreciated and accessed at dropbox.com with log in email:descendantsdonvicentetangana@gmail.com and password: gana12345

    And though there is already an information that could guide on how the root has grown to a tree, there is still a confusion on the surname Tan Gana and Tang Gana . According to some lolo, Don Vicente Tang Gana’s Chinese name is Tan Sek but with the adoption of Spanish surname, it became Tan Gana. However , there are Tan Gana which was not related to the clan because this was from the one who assume the surname of his ninong.

    For the benefit of everybody in the clan, it be would be greatly appreciated if you can help enlighten this confusion. Should there be records that we can refer, our delight to check it will be overwhelming. 

    With kind regards,
    Cynthia Z. Gana
    czgana@yahoo.com

  56. edgardo v. legasto said,

    February 5, 2012 at 7:00 am

    Virgen Dolorosa

    Hide Details
    FROM:
    Edgardo Legasto
    TO:
    tabyong729@yahoo.com
    Message flagged Saturday, February 4, 2012 10:46 PM
    And …. ohhhhh …..b4 the inexplicable virus – seniors’problem – deleted some unmentioned in4mation onto my ageing mind … Christian e. Ama .. stated that according to his father – Romy P. Ama , former chairman of Bgy.San Jose Binan… , the said unfinished edifice was once used to stored sacks of palay , sugar , salt, etc.& l8ter on used to be the residence of Perlas – Ama Family … and let me add too that the famous antique icon of ” VIRGeN DOLOROSA “- which is always at the tail end of religious procession during yearly lenten season in our town & housed too at a special place onto Perlas residence is still intact and for security purposes has been transfered into undisclosed location and still being cared of….

  57. edgardo v. legasto said,

    February 3, 2012 at 2:04 pm

    An addendum , Perlas – Ama’s nearest relative – as provided to me by CHRISTIAN. E Ama during my conversation with him yesterday – Paeng P. Ama , Botchoy ,Tessie , Romualdo , Roberto & some more who
    weren’t mentioned b-coz he’s too busy to entertain my inquiries … regarding my mentioned Philippine eagle , its
    wingspan was 1.5 meters from eagle’s torso . so , its combined wingspan – end to end – is almost 3meters – more or less … and time passes too quickly …as years had come & go … the where-about of said rare diurnal monkey-eating eagle is gone with the wind …..

  58. edgardo v. legasto said,

    February 2, 2012 at 2:29 pm

    —– Forwarded Message —–
    From: Edgardo Legasto
    To: “tabyong729@yahoo.com”
    Sent: Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:25 AM
    Subject: Perlas’ edifice

    You are right Noni … tearing dwn ” Perlas’ ancestral home ” – a vintage edifice in A.Mabini st. and a stone throw away from Rizal monument in our home-town Binan – somehow brings nostalgic feeling to me … it is so b’coz …
    when i was a boy , me and my playmates played ” taguang pong ” inside the vast backyard of said place . Paeng Perlas Ama – one of the heir of said property- was one of my playmates then and others ,as far as I can
    recall , were ; Joevic Gonzalez , Oscar (shorty) Karunungan , Gabriel Belizario , Cezar Legasto , Raul Velarde and many more . . . and for record purposes during that period of time … we ‘d seen alive the first Philippine eagle in captivity – it’s body was as big as 4 combined fighting-cock and has a wingspan of 1.5mts .It was owned by Berting Almeda and the eagle’s cage was just adjacent to Perlas property…and by the way & as far as i know,said edifice which was partially built during mid 18th century was originally built as an ” Almacen ” but convert it into dwelling in early 1920 and was owned by the late spouse Francisco,Francisco Ama & Maria Salud Yatco Perlas …This morning I had been to the area and learned that all of the structure – part by part shall be transfered to its new owner in Sta.Cruz , Laguna…what to say now is “Farewell” ….and last but not the least a factory will soon rise at the area ….

  59. January 30, 2012 at 1:47 pm

    I happen to pass by, my Grandfathers name is “Cesar Alzona”, his children:

    a. Robert Alzona – married to Cely (children are Joan, Ronald, Rosel, Jeffrey)
    b. Lourdes Alzona Hernandez – married to Norbert Hernandez (children are Noriedeth, Lorie Ann, & Don Lubert)
    c. Romeo Lallen Alzona – my father and married to Carmencita Pantaliano (children are Adoracion, Roger, Rowena married to Mussolini Reyes, Rowela, & Robert Conrad Alzona)
    d. Boyet – (deceased)

  60. Noni Agulto said,

    January 28, 2012 at 6:50 am

    another sad story:

    yet another heritage structure that defined the Binan Plaza landscape is now saying goodbye… Perlas house is officially being demolished. =(

  61. Ester Wolf said,

    January 6, 2012 at 2:36 am

    Hello and Happy New Year!

    I would just like to share this cookbook with everyone since it chronicles recipes of dishes particular to Binan (according to the author). The narrative was an interesting read; perhaps some would like to check it out if there are still copies available. The book is called: In My Basket The Cookbook by Lydia D. Castillo. In her book dedication, she states her mother as “Isidra Zarraga of Binan, Laguna.” Publisher: Bookmark Inc. (C)2000; ISBN: 971-569-370-9.

    I have no vested interest in mentioning this book, only that it has a BInan connection. My aunt brought it to my attention while visiting Binan from the US.

    Sincerely,
    Ester Wolf
    Pennsylvania, USA

  62. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    December 31, 2011 at 5:16 am

    Dear Toto,

    Happy New Year. May the Lord continue to shower you with His blessings in the coming year and the years to come.

    It was nice meeting you and having a chat before Christmas, but I wish that it was in a better gathering of friends and not a wake.

    Below is my attempt to re-construct the Biñan plaza of old.

    Warmest regards.

    Tony and Marietta

    ****************************************

    PLAZA RIZAL and the SAN ISIDRO LABRADOR PARISH church

    Captain Juan de Salcedo, during his exploration of the largest freshwater lake that feeds the Pasig River, landed in what is now known as Biñan towards the end of June 1571. He must have found some natural value to the place and decided to establish a Spanish settlement, with a fort and a church.

    Prior to or on the start of the term of Hon. Jesus M. Garcia as Mayor of Biñan, Laguna, the area in front of the San Isidro Labrador Parish Church was dominated by two adjacent semi circular Spanish battlements made of adobe and measuring approximately 40 meters in diameter 6 meters in height. The entrance had a spiral stairways going up to the top (Edgardo Legasto 10/29/11).

    The present day San Isidro Labrador parish church stands on the spot where Agustinian Padres Alfonso de Alvarado and Diego Espinar, who were traveling with Captain Juan de Salcedo, planted a huge wooden cross and con-celebrated a Thanksgiving Mass upon arrival.

    The structures were torn down by Mayor Garcia to make way for the re-alignment and re-development of the plaza (Edgardo Legasto 10/29/11).

    The re-developed plaza had P. Paterno (Gen. M. Capinpin) Street at the top, A. Bonifacio Street on the south, and the Alberto house on the east. The northt side is an eskenita that extends from P. Paterno St., crossing A. Mabini St., going to Barrio De La Paz, to the Biñan River, passing the back side of the Alberto house.

    Along A. Bonifacio, between P. Paterno and A. Mabini, were two-storey buildings with commercial establishments on the street level. If I am not mistaken, the store at the corner of P. Paterno and A. Bonifacio, going towards the market is owned by the family of Dante Amador. Across or diagonal to the said store, along a. Bonifacio going to Barrio Canlalay, was the only Filipino restaurant owned and managed by Mr. Luterio Almeda (Edgardo Legasto 12/07/11).

    Between the building on the corner of A. Bonifacio and A. Mabini and the bahay-na-bato of Flora (Tita Flory) Yatco Yaptinchay, married to Teodoro Evangelista (Antonio C. Cuyegkeng 02/06/11) along A. Mabini was found Colegio de Santa Catalina de Sena, where Ennie Harrison (09/25/11) could have done his initial elementary schooling.

    After crossing A. Mabini going to Barrio San Antonio, A. Bonifacio gives way to the San Isidro Labrador Parish Church and the old municipal hall as the west boundary of the plaza.

    The parish church built by the Augustinian’s, who run the parish of Biñan until 1637 when the Dominicans took over. The parish was turned over to the Archdiocese of Manila at the end of the 18th Century. The original Augustinian church was destroyed twice by earthquakes. The June 3, 1826 earthquake not only destroyed the church, but also included the destruction of the convento. The second earthquake destruction of the church happened on June 22, 1880.

    Church reconstruction begun in 1892, upon the initiative of the Dominican’s Rev. Fr. Rafael Pujol and Rev. Ulpiano Harrera, but got derailed when the town of Biñan joined the Philippine revolution on May 28, 1898. Construction finally ended with the completion of the belfry on May 13, 1929.

    After the war, church re-modeling was undertaken from 1953 to 1957. However, the church and the old convent were again destroyed, this time by fire, on February 1968. Through the initiative of Mayor Garcia, the church and convent was re-constructed.

    Beginning with Msgr. Valeriano Caguicla as parish priest, in the 1980’s, numerous improvements were continuously being made on the church, convent and its surroundings.

    After the entrance of the municipio and along the left side of the Alberto house, the eskenita Emilio Jacinto going to the town market begins. At the entrance of the Biñan Public Market, which is on the municipio side of the eskenita, was Botica Yatco of Dr. Francisco E. Yatco (Edgardo Legasto 12/15/11), married to Asuncion Belisario (Christopher Yatco 06/07/11).

    In front of both the municipio and the public market was the front of the Alberto house. The house stretched the full length of the plaza and ended in another eskenita going to the Biñan River. On the market side corner of the house was the Alberto’s outlet of sugar and flour, while the far corner had Ligaya Theater (Edgardo Legasto 11/08/11). Ligaya Theater becomes the venue of the “Biñaneses” and the Los Maduros balls when it is raining (Antonio C. Cuyegkeng 04/09/11). The pospas na goto stand of Tonio Sevilla was outside the entrance to the theater (Antonio C. Cuyegkeng 02/06/11).

    In the middle of the square formed by the Church and municipio, the Alberto house, the eskenita that crosses A. Mabini on the way to Barrio De La Paz, and the bottom of the rectangular concrete plaza platform, stood the unpainted and fenceless monument of Dr. Jose P. Rizal, with his back towards the Alberto house. Filomeno Gana, Jose Yatco and another Biñan resident were instrumental in putting up the Rizal memorial in the town plaza, a smaller version of the one at Luneta (Rafael G. Hocson 02/06/11).

    The length elevated rectangular concrete platform, where Sal Gonzalez (08/21/10) used to go skating, was aligned with the side wall of the Biñan church along A. Mabini to P. Paterno. The width was from A. Bonifacio to the eskenita crossing A. Mabini St., going to Barrio De La Paz, to go to the Biñan river on the backside of the Alberto House.

    On the P. Paterno end of the platform could be found an amphitheater with 10 tiers of cement benches. The amphitheater faced the Rizal Monument. The area was used by musicians during town fiesta, for serenatas, as well as political campaign rallies and speeches. On regular days, you will find some prominent Biñan figures and other local personalities talking, arguing, debating about every and all issues and topics under the sun (Edgardo Legasto 12/07/11).

    Along P. Paterno corner A. Bonifacio stood a 2-storey stone residential building. Further along P. Paterno, on the right back side of the amphitheater, can be found the two-storey wooden, with nipa roof, ancestral Yatco houses owned by brothers Mariano (Lolo Nano) S. Yatco, married to Raymunda (Lola Munda) Yaptinchay Almeda, and Jose (Lolo Potong) S. Yatco, married to Generosa (Lola Osay) Gana. The common driveway of the Yatco houses was aligned with the eskenita that goes to the Biñan river along the back of the Alberto house (Antonio C. Cuyegkeng 05/05/11).

    On the middle of the said eskenita and facing the plaza can be found Aling Ruth’s Store (Sal Gonzalez 08/21/10) of Ruth Zarate. On the left side of Aling Ruth was a barbershop and on the other side was Biñan Hardware of the Almazan’s (Antonio C. Cuyegkeng 05/05/11).

    Sadly, most, if not all, all of these structures are gone or completely modernized. The amphitheater and most of the elevated platform is now a covered basketball court; the parish church has an ultra-modern façade and built; the municipio, abandoned due to the relocation of the city government to Barrio Zapote, is now a decrepit image of its old grandeur: the Rizal monument fenced in mini-park with the similarity to the Luneta monument practically gone; Alberto house has been sold and dismantled; and, worse, the public market has spilled into the town plaza and adjoining streets, including P. Paterno, till halfway to the eskenita that is now called Noli Gana Road (Antonio C. Cuyegkeng 02/06/11).

  63. EDGARDO V. LEGASTO said,

    December 25, 2011 at 12:23 am

    MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL ….DECEMBER 25,2011 PACITA , SAN PEDRO LAGUNA 8:30 AM ….. FROM LEGASTO FAMILY

  64. Christopher Yatco said,

    December 19, 2011 at 1:32 am

    To Tito Edgardo, our country’s weather has become abnormal and these typhoons have morphed into something more destructive. I believe that all we can do is pray that we’ll be spared from natural calamities. I’m both related to Tita Cora and to the famous cardiologist Dr. jorge garcia who is one of the founders of asian hospital. Tito Carlito and tito Tom passed away years ago.

  65. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 18, 2011 at 8:18 pm

    deluged the southern Philippines mounted Sunday, with the death toll rising to 652, the Philippine Red Cross said.
    Hundreds are missing, the relief agency said, after entire villages were swept away.
    The stench of death permeated the air as aid workers scrambled to help survivors.
    President Beningo Aquino plans to visit the region Tuesday.
    The disaster has left heartbreaking scenes of families with children looking for ways to get by during the festive Christmas season.
    “Do we still have Christmas, mother?” one crying little girl asked her mother, according to the Red Cross. “Will I get my toys and my new pair of shoes you promised?”
    “Of course you will,” the mother replied. “Christmas will always be around.” . . . This is the sad story at the internet which I copy from Cnn site …. and yes though we were mourning for said nature’s deluge ……. …………..Christmas will always be around ….for the x’mas spirit is always within our heart , . . .MERRY CHRISTMAS TO EVERYONE. pacita 2a san pedro. laguna , philippines

  66. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 18, 2011 at 2:27 pm

    erratum . . . Yes , Chris , I erred on naming your uncle Tomas as Carlito – and I thank you for correcting me , nevertheless , I vividly seeing Tom on my mind while doing my initial reply to you …with respect to your uncle Carlito Belisario , I knew him too ( he, didn’t ) – so with Fe , wife of our former town Arthur Alonte and Cora , wife of Dr. George Garcia … and b4 i 4get that during my aforementioned period of time i am sure that your LOLO KIKOY was wearing ” Ang Dangal ” the pioneer maker of hand made slipper in our town . . . then at the passage of time the heirs of “Ang Dangal ” splintered and Belisario Slipper & Zarraga Slipper were founded. .. and please correct me for my errors …

  67. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 17, 2011 at 10:31 am

    Re: villanueva pls edit i need this asap ( pls )

    Hide Details
    FROM:
    Eric Legasto
    TO:
    Edgardo Legasto
    Message flagged Saturday, December 17, 2011 5:51 PMMessage body

    Dida,

    FYI, as edited by Tina.

    Dikdok

    From: Edgardo Legasto
    To: Eric Legasto
    Sent: Saturday, 17 December 2011 6:37 PM
    Subject: villanueva pls edit i need this asap ( pls )

    Let me begin by saying ” Kumusta ‘insan? ” … you mentioned MARIANO VILLANUEVA* of San Antonio , Binan , Laguna is your great-grandfather so I am sure we are -at least 10 % – related by blood, for he too is my ” LELONG “. . .” W O W, this is amazing! ” we really ought to say a million thanks to the creator of this site who gave us the opportunity to share bits and pieces on issues from all walks of life. It is through this site as well that both readers and contributors are able to trace their lineage.
    You mentioned Dalmacio Villanueva, if my memory served me right is Mariano’s son . He was a farmer and hectares of his family-owned ricefield were being tilled by the so called ” kasama ” . To date, the said ricefield exists no more, and for personal reasons I do not want to elaborate any further. They used to own 3 Kalesas as well. The said “kalesa” brought back lots of memories… my Tio Ibarra Ama* & Tio Bindoy Lopez * – both brothers-in-law of my father used the kalesa of my Lolo Dasyong to help my Father Octavio* eloped with my mother who was a pretty teener – she’s just fifteen then . . . and the rest is my family history . Allow me to mention that Purificacion Villanueva – my mother* – is the eldest among 9 begotten children of my “LOLO DASYONG* with his wife Maria Alipala* followed by ; Tio Bining , Tio Albert*. Tio Americo* , Tio Tanoy , Tia Celia* , Tio Domeng , Tia Julia & Tio Tinoy* ( * notes of joining our creator ).
    On the other hand, Eugenio Villanueva* – my Lolo Genio … is a generous man who – when i was just a little boy played with his sons Joe & Vicente* in their ” LOOBAN “. Lolo Genio always gave me fruits – Balimbing , Star Apple and Santol which were in abundance in their backyard . The list of their offsprings ; Tio Rufing Infante Villanueva , Tia Mireng* , Tia Leoning , Tio Genie , Tia Auring , Joe – I didn’t call him Tio for I am older than him , Vicente* , Omeng , Luming & Tony . Lolo Genio was a Sweepstakes ticket seller .
    Maria Villanueva , I can’t recall her existence though there was a time when I was a young boy my mother accompanied me to a fiesta in Sampalucan , a sityo of San Antonio and as I recall further we went to the Yatco’s residence… I remembered certain ROMY YATCO & MARINA YATCO is Maria’s offspring .
    And by the way ” Pinsang Maning ” … are you aware of the fact that during mid-1850’s a young Mandarin speaking 10 year- old Chinese boy (Go is the family name) – who according to Tia Celia wandered around aimlessly in Binondo , Manila . It was learned later on that he was left behind unnoticed by the Chinese traders who once in a blue moon dock their wooden ” Casco ” (a Chinese sea going vessel) in MUELLE de BINONDO . . . and to cut my story short about the boy . . . through ” Ilog Pasig ” – he reached Binan by way of Laguna de Bay and through the water ways of Binan river … land route between Manila & Binan was non-existent yet. . . and the wandering boy was cared & unceremoniously adopted by a certain MR________ Evangelista … Christianize and obviously our PROGENITOR . . . MARIANO VILLANUEVA .

  68. Christopher Yatco said,

    December 17, 2011 at 1:57 am

    I heard that people from muntinlupa , las pinas , and other towns in laguna would be sent to Binan for their schooling because there were no schools in muntinlupa and las pinas back then and in laguna, most of the schools were in binan. people like mayor nene aguilar of las pinas was said to have received his first formal education in binan.

  69. December 16, 2011 at 6:29 am

    To Mr.Egardo Villanueva Legasto,Thank you for the nice post like memory lane..my great grand father Mariano Villanueva of Binan a contemporary of Eleuterio A. Yatco (they married both sisters Fernanda Evangelista and Basila Evangelista)..Marianos surviving sibling Maria,Dalmacio and Eugenio Villanueva,are you sir some how related to this Villanueva family of Binan?thank you,from Maning

  70. Christopher Yatco said,

    December 15, 2011 at 10:00 am

    To Edgardo, Dr. Ruben Yatco is my dad and i agree with you that he was a very good basketball player. I saw him play in the superlolo league. Tito Carlito was my dad’s first cousin from the Belizario side.My Dad’s brother is Thomas Yatco who exactly fits your description of Carlito.You must have mixed up the names. Thanks for sharing your stories about Lola Isyon and Lolo Kikoy.

  71. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 15, 2011 at 3:20 am

    and let me add ( hello toto i hope you won’t mind using your website) that this week- in a clear night – geminids will shower our night sky ., meteors will probably comes from the direction of Gemini constellation at 1 am if you are looking easterly south .DEC 16 at 9 o clock position the globus moon was at 10 degrees below Gemini constellation but almost kissing constellation Leo… happy viewing to all .

  72. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 15, 2011 at 2:41 am

    Hi there – Chris – i’m glad to know that though my essay was poorly constructed – due to my own fault – at least there is someone like you who really ” napagtiyagaan ” reading my memoir which according to you is nostalgic.
    As you stated ” Lolo mo si “Doktor Kikoy … are you the progeny of Carlito or Dr.Ruben ? … anyway let me begin that during L8 ’50’s i’d seen Carlito during my teens – he was an ” ALPHANS ” and had the feature of an athlete ala-Schwarzenegger , played basketball & a shy guy but he don’t know me personally for i was much younger than him … I was acquainted with Dr.Ruben but we never had a jolly time for he belongs to Lucky7 & the leading point scorer of their basketball club – is it obvious to add ” nagtitilian ang mga teens of different sexes – including the likes of Piolo’s , Midas Marquez , etc. ” when he was attempting to score ala- Francis Arnaiz style. I belong and one of the original founding member of ” Frigailers Club ” in 1957 and our basketball club was their archrival …I knew Digna & Josie ( they don’t ) … but I hope you won’t be jeloused when I mention that I am ahead of you kissing the hands of your Lola Isyon & Lolo Kikoy ( mano po traditon ) during Christmas in 1948 , been blessed and given one ” bagol ” by the generous duo . A bagol was the 5centavo and during those days a single centavo according to Raffy Gana Hocson could buy a lot of candies . During those years your lolo -was a famed Doctor stocky built man who usually attired in white , holding a ” baston – it’s a status symbol then -and your lola – a beauteous ” mahinhin ” Pilipina lady which always wearing a smile to everyone. Usually when your lolo & lola (a Pharmacist) went to family owned ” Botica Yatco ” at the entrance of Binan Public Market they passed the dirt road eskinita named in honor of the Brain of Katipunan – Emilio Jacinto. . . they made a couple of minutes stop to the lone mini sari sari of my Lolo Eyo ” in P.Paterno st . Said E.Jacinto st. was renamed in honor of Joaquin Velasco – a musical composer / movie director and resided at said street cornering P.Burgos . which is just a stone throw away from your ancestor’s residence. ” Kamusta po Tio Eyo ” was their daily greetings as they smiled & waived to my lolo and up to now I am puzzled what is their relation to each other … an by the way let me add that Dr. Francisco Yatco was one of the original ” GRAND MADUROS ” an elite club of BINANENSES … unfinished

  73. Christopher Yatco said,

    December 13, 2011 at 11:34 pm

    To Edgardo, keep up your nostalgic mood. Your stories about old Binan are enjoyable to read. Your eloquence makes your depiction of old Binan as clear as crystal. If only i can travel back in time, I’ll be the first one to book first class. You mentioned my lolo Dr. Francisco Yatco in one of your comments. How was he in person?

  74. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 12, 2011 at 2:38 pm

    Planetarium – Interactive star map and virtual sky
    neave.com
    A browser-based virtual planetarium of stars and planets, customiza , , , , , , to the regular contributors and followers of TOTO GONZALEZ ‘s ” The Families of old Binan …. if interested in astronomy the above is the link ….always click your position i.e. Philippines ….U S A or europe etc. just browse and you will learn Tnx

  75. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 11, 2011 at 2:40 pm

    It was 45 mins. before midnight – last night – when our telephone rang then I heard …” Dheeda its Tita Miks on the line ” – my grand daughter Akina yelled . Dheeda was the coined word they all called me at home and the person on the line was my daughter Eleanor from Japan … Just for the record she was Eleanor Nishiumi – a Filipina tv host of the program ” MISS OH TOKYO ” of wins promotion … she was married to TOSHIYA NISHIUMI and presently residing in Saitama – Ken .
    ” Dheeda “- she exclaimed – ” it’s too cold here because snow are falling but i just want you to know that there is an ongoing lunar eclipse right now ? ” . My daughter knew regarding my keen interest in astronomy because when she was still young i let them know about heavenly bodies . I lazily went to ” Azotea ” and yes despite semi-cloudy heaven in our area … the ongoing lunar phenomena was clearly visible as the earth’s umbra covered nearly 70% of the moon – while it was sandwiched between constellations of ORION , GEMINI , TAURUS & Auriga . . . and after 20 mins . . . earth shadowed nearly blanketed the moon – a very thin cresent line was visible . . .
    My fascination regarding heavenly bodies began when I witnessed the total solar eclipse on June 20 , 1955 – i was 13 yrs. old then . . . Mang Mario de Matta told to my father – Octavio Legasto – that it was a bad omen . Mang Gavino Belizario also nooded ,,, but my uncle Lorenzo Carino & Francisco Legasto disagreed and a debate follows which is which … all of them were market vendors at Binan public market . . . though most of the time they have had different opinion … they shared a things in common … all of them was wearing the Zarraga’s Slipper – a native hand madeslipper for men which was very famous during that era . Even the Don Donnes of Binan – Don Menong , Don Tivo , Don Qua …Senyor Alberto used it … it was a status symbol then in our town which a poor man can’t afford to buy – and merely costs ten pesos a pair and the value of pesos was two against a dollar … unfinished

  76. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 7, 2011 at 2:41 pm

    T’was 4:30 when i rose from bed on 5th of December 2011 & as usual – after I’ve done my early morning habit – I went to mini lawn of my not so modest home in Pacita . Facing north-east I look skyward and i’d seen the famed constellation Ursa Major at 11 o-clock position . I pan my eyes direct to east and seen the red planet at the lower right of star Regulus in constellation Leo – while the ringed planet Saturn has just peer onto the eastern horizon at the foot of giant star Spica in constellation Virgo … momentarily thin fog shrouded some part of our village . ” wow ! “- i exclaimed . . . morning fog has long been gone in this area and existed merely in the memory of born survivor of 1930’s , 40’s & 50’s who’d experienced said ” HAMOG “… (that evening all TV. network flash the news that smog enveloped some parts of metro manila specially in Makati where smog was much thicker ) Climate change is one of the major factor that alters earth weather. . . and though ” Hamog ” – is almost gone i can recall that it occured daily every infant morning of December – six decade ago – and if you were standing at the perimeter edge of Plaza Rizal facing west , you could see the only Filipino restaurant owned & managed by Mr. LUTERO ALMEDA at the corner of P.Paterno & A.Bonifacio street which was been blanketed by fog all the way heading to” Nayon ng Canlalay “. . . it is so because during late 40’s – 60% of said area was rice-field and meadows .
    At the core of the rectangular town plaza (basketball court now) was the octagonal shape bandstand usually used by musicians during town fiesta serenatas and political campaign as well … 10 cemented bench enclaved said area where some prominent figures – like – Don Pascual Lopez de Leon(donqua) , Don Filimeno Gana(Don Menong),Dr.Francisco Yatco , Dr.Ponching Potenciano , Dr.Angeling Yaptinchay (my baptismal godfather) etc .usually gathered there for their cordial conversation ,exchange notes , politics ,religion and etc.(Malls is unheard of during that time) . commoners usualy joined them …Lolo Eyo …my father Octavio … uncle Deo Legasto …Mr Karunungan and so many more used the plaza as hang out – which from dusk to dawn the plaza remains unempty … unfinished

  77. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 4, 2011 at 10:41 am

    —– Forwarded Message —–
    From: Eric Legasto
    To: Edgardo Legasto
    Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 5:51 PM
    Subject: Re: puto bumbong (edited version)

    Dida,

    corrections highlighted in BLUE with the help also of Tina.

    Good luck! and advance Merry Christmas too to your friend Toto Gonzalez and readers of Remembrance of things awry – Families of old Binan

    Dik/Tin 51-A Fields Parade , Albany , Auckland , New Zealand

    From: Edgardo Legasto
    To: Eric Legasto
    Sent: Sunday, 4 December 2011 9:27 PM
    Subject: puto bumbong

    “Christmas is just around the corner…” on my mind – as I searched to park my out-dated mini car at the too busy Plaza Rizal in Binan, at dawn yesterday for my market purposes. The area – i guess – was jammed-by thousands of indefatigable people from all walks of life doing whatever intent they have. Some of them were legitimate whole-sellers/retailers/repackers etc. Vendors were sleepless the night prior, selling their stuff which was illuminated by modern technology. Others bought the merchandise and retailed it elsewhere. There were hustlers, beggars, Magdalenas & tramps … Co-existing there too were some flirts, feminine in Adams’ body donned their Pempengco’s or Lady Gaga’s in coined sing-a-long videoke & drug pushers as well. That scenery I have observed yesterday was in-contrast to the late 40’s era, where it seemed that the civilization was just beginning . Lighting the Plaza Rizal then came from two incandescent lamp-posts that the local gov’t provided … Meralco isn’t in existence yet and most of the peddlers were using improvised lighting being fueled by carbon which is called ” ilawang de carburo ” … or sometimes by sulo – a bamboo shaft being lighted by a kerosene-soaked rug.You can hear no music at all for even a transistor radio was unheard of during that period. And yes – yesterday at the town plaza – I saw a lady vendor hardly shaking the hot pipe-shaped mini bamboo to yield its content… “Ahhhh puto bumbong” – i recalled. . . closed my eyes … and my mind travelled back-in-time , faster than the speed of light and saw myself, then a bare-footed six-year old boy doing the same odd things – shaking the hot pipe-shaped mini bamboo to yield its content … PUTO BUMBONG not once nor twice but for so many times just to have enough of them to be sold . The native rolled-cakes were best sellers during “simbang-gabi”, normally observed before Christmas. I was a helper of Tia Isyon (Sison) and Tia Emmy (Miranda) at their mobile store near the entrance of Alberto’s residence…Donya Pilaring (Alberto) was among our regulars . . . and so as Antonia Gonzalez and the famed Doctor Tunying Gonzalez .. . unfinished . . .and by the way , for the sake of future records , i will include in this article that last December 1 ,2011 my grandchild – ERINA CLAIR M.LEGASTO celebrated her 8th birthday at their residence in Auckland, New Zealand . She was the daughter of my son Enrique and her mom was Maria Cristina Layola Mascareñas of Sta.Rosa City, Laguna.

  78. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    December 4, 2011 at 8:32 am

    Christmas is just a wink away – was on my mind – while i’m searching to park my out-model mini car at the too busy Plaza Rizal in Binan – at dawn yesterday for my market purposes . The area – i guess – was jammed-by more than thousand of untiring people from all walks of life doing whatever intent they have had being there . Some of them were legitimate whole-sellers/retailers/repackers etc. Vendors were sleepless the previous night selling their stuff which was illuminated by modern technology. Others bought the merchandise and retailed it elsewhere There were hustlers , beggars , Magdalenas’ & tramps … Coexist there too were some flirt-feminine in Adams’ body donned their Pempengco’s or Lady Gaga in coined sing-a-long videoke & drug pushers as well. That market scenery that i observed yesterday was in-contrast during late 40’s at the same area , where it seemed that the civilization was just beginning . Lighting the Plaza Rizal then came from two incandescent lamp-post that the local gov’t provided … Meralco isn’t in existence yet and most of the peddlers were using improvised lighting being fueled by carbon which called ” ilawang de carburo ” … or sometimes by sulo – a bamboo shaft being lighted by a kerosene soaked rug.You can hear no music at all for even a transistor radio was unheard during that period of time. And yes – yesterday at the town plaza – I saw a lady vendor hardly shaking the hot pipe-shaped mini bamboo to yield its content… “Ahhhh puto bumbong” – i uttered. . . closed my eyes … and … you won’t believe as my mind travel backed-in-time , faster than the speed of light and seeing my self – then a bare-footed six years old boy doing the same odd things – shaking the hot pipe-shaped mini bamboo to yield its content … PUTO BUMBONG not once nor twice but for so many times just to have enough of them to be sold . It was the most sold native rolled-cakes when simbang-gabi was observed before Christmas. I was a helper of Tia Isyon (Sison) and Tia Emmy (Miranda) at their movable store near the entrance of Alberto’s residence…Donya Pilaring (Alberto) was among our patronizer . . . and so as Antonia Gonzalez and the famed Doctor Tunying Gonzalez .. . unfinished . . .and by the way , for the sake of future records , i will include to this article that last December 1 ,2011 my grandchild – ERINA CLAIR M.LEGASTO celebrated her 8th birthday at their residence in Albany , New Zealand . She was daughter of my son Enrique and her mom was Cristina Layola Mascarenas of Sta.Rosa , Laguna .

  79. Michael Lomotan said,

    November 15, 2011 at 8:05 am

    I just wanted to jump in and say how interesting this blog post is. Lolo Jose Yatco “Lolo Pitong” and Lola Generosa Gana “Lola Osay” were my great grandparents. My grandparents were Socorro Yatco Amoranto and Dr. Rodrigo Amoranto. Any information or stories are greatly appreciated :)

  80. November 13, 2011 at 3:43 pm

    Thank you Tony (Cuyegkeng) for clarifying some things. I want to give my own clarification:

    I have a Spanish document that states the following:

    Jose Carlos Almeda (Jose I) married Bernabela Rubio. They have 9 children:

    1. Basilia – married to Pedro del Barrio
    2. Manuela – widow of Vicente Prospero Francisco
    3. Eduvijes – married to Higino Prospero Francisco
    4. Antonia – married to Marcos Garcia
    5. Bernabe
    6. Pablo – married to Petrona Gomez. They are the parents of Manuel, who is the ancestor of Ed Padlan
    7. Jose II – married to Josefa Mendoza. Their son is Jose III
    8. Catalina
    9. Ana Almeda – married to a Garcia, then to a Yatco.

    Higino Francisco married Eduviges Rubio Almeda and had 8 children:
    1. Fausta Almeda Francisco
    2. Dalmacio A. Francisco
    3. Paulino A. Francisco
    4. Escolastica Francisco
    5. Estefania Francisco
    6. Jacinto Francisco
    7. Jose Francisco
    8. Lucia Francisco

    Fausta Almeda Francisco married Jose Mendoza Almeda (Jose III) and had 5 children:
    1. Irene Almeda
    2. Purisima Almeda
    3. Tolstoi Almeda
    4. Concepcion Almeda (Died single early)
    5. Pilar Almeda

    Irene Almeda married Leon Resurreccion of Arayat, Pampanga and had 5 children:
    1. Rafael Almeda Resurreccion
    2. Jose Almeda Resurreccion
    3. Higino Almeda Resurreccion-Francisco (adopted son of Lucia Almeda Francisco)
    4. Fausto A. Resurreccion
    5. Concepcion A. Resurreccion-Diy

  81. November 8, 2011 at 12:45 am

    BINAN at ‘ 48 … as i will recall further – pls correct me if i’m wrong – the town plaza was poorly asphalted .Scores of karetela was the main transport used by the locals as they move – in & out- from different barrios during market day- sunday(s) & wednesday(s)…and yes there were ” Paragos” too – the sled laden farm product being pulled by.the beast of burden .,, cows , goats ,ducks etc,,, was being auctioned there during market days. I’ll bet that your cold was quite heavy if you didn’t smell those stinky waste of said animals which were just a stone throw away from Alberto’s Villa – which also- was the commercial center then .If you are standing at the back of Rizal monument – facing east – you you will see at left corner of that perimeter was a rice mill . . . which at the passage of time was eclipsed & gave inch for the construction of Cine Ligaya where the zaruela and balagtasan was held when movies weren’t shown .At further right of the main entrance & underneath of said Villa was the Alberto’s outlet of sugar & flour – which at the passage of time became ” outlet of GOOD-Year tires & product which was been managed by the LIM-ACO sisters …then during late 70’s became Philippine National Bank manage by VIRGILIO LEGASTO CARINO ,which later on said bank was relocated in-between the non functional old Binan Theatre owned by the Carillo’s & POTENCIANO residence where they stored the famed icon of our Lord Jesus Christ – fallen & being beaten by Jewish soldiers – said antique icons was been the yearly high-light af the catholic procession every wednesday of holy week , The said Potenciano blg – as we use to called – was also used as elementary school during that time as my ATE – OFELIA LEGASTO ALOG was at grade 2 tutored by VIRGINIA LEGASTO VERACRUZ while i was at grade 1 and my teacher was MS.AGULTO ,,,,unfinished

  82. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    November 7, 2011 at 4:55 pm

    Hi Toto,

    First, many thanks to Ennie Harrison (09/25/11) for the additional information to the family tree of Marcos Dimas Yatco. Ennie, the source of the information on Manuel Gomez Yatco married Vicenta Reyes is the entry of Cesar Cariño (06/06/11), who found the names in the Biñan church records.

    ALMEDA

    Another Biñan family name found in the main section of The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna with no specific entries is “ALMEDA”.

    The oldest Almeda in the comment file is from Nonie Agulto (04/13/10) quoting from Pedro Paterno’s listing of Biñan leaders (alcalde, kapitan or gobernadorcillo) from 1757-1898. The list included 1851 – Don Lazaro Almeda Carlos; 1854 – Don Jose Almeda Carlos; and 1858-59 – Don Agaton Almeda Carlos. The fourth Almeda in the list, Don Andres Almeda, was for Kapitan in 1888. Don Andress was followed by Don Pablo Potenciano, who was Kapitan of Biñan in 1889.

    Don Pablo Potenciano was married to Feliza Garcia, daughter of Agaton Garcia and Maria Salome Almeda Carlos.

    Due to the close proximity of their terms of office the 3 alkaldes, Lazaro, Jose, and Agaton, could be brothers and Andres Almeda, a son/nephew, and Maria Salome Almeda Carlos, a daughter/niece.

    The next Almeda Carlos entry from the Pedro Paterno listing was already for 1907 sugar inventory of Don Cirilo Almeda Carlos and Doña Regina Almeda Carlos (Nonie Agulto 04/13/10). After these entries, the Almeda Carlos surname disappeared.

    Considering the period involved is during the Spanish regime, could they be using the Spanish name format, meaning that “CARLOS” is the surname of their mother, and “ALMEDA” is their family name?

    If “YES”, could Jose Carlos Almeda I married to Bernabela Rubio of Rene Resurreccion (08/22/11) be a descendant of one of the 3 Almeda Carlos alkaldes?

    A daughter of Jose Carlos I and Bernabela Rubio Almeda, Ana, became the second wife of Emeterio (or Elueterio) Asuncion Yatco, the grandson of Marcos Dimas Yatco and older brother of Jose “Coseng” Asuncion Yatco (Cesar Cariño 08/29/11). Ana Rubio Almeda was not mentioned by Rene Resurreccion (08/22/11).

    Jose “Coseng” Asuncion Yatco married Victoria Custodio Almeda, daughter of Lazaro Almeda married to Maria Juana Marvillas Custodio (Cesar Cariño 06/06/11).

    Cesar Cariño (06/08/11) identified another Almeda family that of Antonio Almeda married to Maria Dolores Ponce. Antonio and Maria Dolores Almeda were the parents of Andres Ponce Almeda married to Maria (Kapitang Maria) Gana Yaptinchay.

    A 3rd Almeda family is that of Pociano Almeda and Severina Trinidad of Biñan. According to Tita Freddie Almeda Consunji, her father, Dominador Trinidad Almeda, is the son of Pociano and Severina Almeda. Dominador married Josefa San Gabriel Mendoza and moved the family to Naga City, Camarines Sur in 1924. Another son of Pociano and Severina Almeda, Claro, moved to Tanuan, Batangas. There is no information as whether he was married, but he had no children. Dominador and Claro had other siblings, that have yet to be identified.

    Dominador and Josefa Almeda were blessed with 8 children, the eldest is Tita Freddie (Fredesvinda) married to David M. Consunji; followed by Angelita married to Felipe F. Cruz; then, by Emmanuel; Erlinda Chikiamco; Zenaida Roxas; Benjamin; Dominador; and the youngest, Ermelo.

    A grandniece of Manuel Gomez Almeda married to Severina Martinez Lerma (Eduardo Agustin Padlan 11/01/11), Fausta Almeda Francisco married Jose Mendoza Almeda III, son of Higino Francisco and Eduviges Rubio Almeda. Eduviges is the daughter of Jose Carlos I and Bernabela Rubio Almeda.

    Fausta Almeda Francisco married Jose Mendoza Almeda III are the parents of Irene Francisco Almeda married to Leon Resurreccion (Lucy Francisco Borromeo 11/01/11).

    Do Manuel Gomez Almeda and siblings belong to another Almeda family of Biñan, or do they belong to one of the identified Almeda families?

    Are Dalmacio, Horacio, Jacinto, Paulino and Jose children of siblings Jose Mendoza Almeda III and Fausta Almeda Francisco (Lucy Francisco Borromeo 11/01/11)? If yes, who are Purisima, Tolstoi and Pilar Francisco Almeda (Rene Resurreccion 08/22/11)?

    How are the Carlos Almedas of Pedro Paterno (Nonie Agulto 04/13/10);
    Jose Carlos Almeda I (Rene Resurreccion 08/22/11);
    Lazaro Almeda (Cesar Cariño 06/06/11);
    Antonio Almeda (Cesar Cariño 06/08/11);
    Pociano Almeda; and
    Manuel Gomez Almeda et. al. (Eduardo Agustin Padlan 11/01/11)
    related?

    Tony

  83. lucy francisco borromeo said,

    November 1, 2011 at 5:56 pm

    I also emailed you to facilitate your sending the picture. Thank you.

  84. lucy francisco borromeo said,

    November 1, 2011 at 5:45 pm

    Hello Mr. Padlan,

    Regarding your post, it’s sad that my parents, Higino Resurreccion Francisco and Nory Gana Francisco are no longer around to shed light on our relationship. The names of some of your relatives – Ester Almeda, Rosario (Charing) Almeda – sound very familiar. I must have heard them from my Lola Irene (Neneng), Lola Lucia (Uchay), or my parents.

    Certainly we are related to the Almedas of Binan. I’m a bit puzzled though with your statement “Leon, the father of Irene, who married a Resureccion, and other children; a sister, who married a Francisco, and they had Lucia and two other daughters, none of whom married; a sister, who married a Toledo, and settled in Silang, Cavite; and possibly other siblings” .

    Irene Francisco Almeda was the daughter of Fausta Francisco and Jose Almeda, older sister of Lucia, Estefania and Escolastica who never married. Their parents were Higino Francisco and Eduviges Almeda. Other siblings were Dalmacio, Horacio, Jacinto, Paulino and Jose.

    Irene married Leon Resurreccion from Pampanga and their children were Rafael, Jose, Higino, Fausto and Concepcion. Higino was adopted by Lucia, his grand-aunt and became Higino Resurreccion Francisco.

    It will be my pleasure to receive the picture of my Lola Lucia teaching piano to your daughter. Was she a member of the Lucia Francisco Music Circle? If she took her lessons in my lola’s house, I might even know her!

    Best regards,

    Lucy Francisco Borromeo

  85. Eduardo Agustin Padlan said,

    November 1, 2011 at 4:49 pm

    Hi Toto,

    First, let me introduce myself (I am almost certain I am related to you).

    My maternal greatgrandparents were Manuel Gomez Almeda, who was from Biñan, Laguna, and Severina Martinez Lerma, who was from Manila. They had six daughters: Natividad, Micaela, Rosario, Amada, Rosa, and Ester.

    Manuel Gomez Almeda had a brother, Leon, the father of Irene, who married a Resurreccion, and other children; a sister, who married a Francisco, and they had Lucia and two other daughters, none of whom married; a sister, who married a Toledo, and settled in Silang, Cavite; and possibly other siblings.

    My grandmother, Rosario Lerma Almeda was classmates and close friends with Irene Resurreccion, her first cousin and who I gather is the biological mother of Higino (Resurreccion) Francisco. (Higino Resurreccion was adopted by Lucia Almeda Francisco, who was a first cousin of my grandmother.)

    So, Higino Francisco is a second cousin of my mother, Aida Almeda Agustin, and I am a third cousin of Lucy Francisco Borromeo. If you are related to Lucy Francisco Borromeo, we are related.

    So much for introductions.

    The reason I am writing is I want to send (3rd) cousin Lucy a picture of Lucia Almeda Francisco, taken while she was teaching piano to my eldest daughter about 43 years ago.

    I would appreciate it if you would relay this message to (3rd) cousin Lucy and she can decide if she wants to get that picture. Thanks.

    Eduardo Agustin Padlan

    eapadlanmail-2008@yahoo.com or eduardo.padlan@gmail.com

  86. October 29, 2011 at 7:02 am

    As far as I can recall – of which i said … a dirty boy playing bare-footed at the unpaved plaza of Binan …. Bakya – a wooden footwear was just introduced in our town brought by the Capili(s) family from Paete who resided in a sityo called Florante – adjacent to Alberto’s Villa. Hon,Candido Carino of San Antonio was the incumbent Mayor then and l8ter on at passage of time became the handler and manager of Binan boxing idol Little Cesar (Redondo) of San Antonio who once became an asian boxing champ in bantamweight division. while his Excelency Manuel Roxas y Acuna was the President of the Philippines…. During the mentioned period of time – two adjacent semi circular spanish fortress stand at the front of the old Church ( its the parking area today) ..We played hide & seek to said ” bantayan ” w/my playmates – & to named some Cezar & Roberto Legasto ; ; Gabriel de Matta Belizario ; Saturnino Jimanez jr ;Vicente Vasquez ;; Manolito de Matta ; Fidel Espinosa ;;Abelardo Ama ; Mariano Lopez de Leon ;Boy Evangelista ; Reynaldo Karunungan a certain BOY AGULTO and if i include more of my playmates – i think I can add more than a hundreds of them ….Yes said adobe structured edifice – which measured approximately 40 meters in diameter 6 meters in height and at the entrance has had a spiral stairways going up to the top was torn down due to town plaza re-alignment during the Mayorship of Hon.Jesus Garcia . REV Father Cakixto Guevarra was our Kura Paroko. then..as my Aunt GREGORIA Almarinez Legasto – (Mrs Totoy Marcelo now ) as a choir member – used to sing Franz Schubert’s AVE MARIA….Joaquin Velasco was her mentor….. to be continued

  87. October 28, 2011 at 4:31 am

    hi ENNIE HARRISON …I owe an apology to you and to those been offended by me – though being uninvited – posted a toughie remark at quest for my ancestry and relatives as well . Too L8 4me glimpsing your very im4mative – likewise – uplifting account regarding complex family marriages..which you stated that a certain JUAN LEGASTO CAPILI married MARGARITA YATCO and their off-spring SOCORRO was your maternal grandmom…Hello again for your roots & mine was entwined to a common geneology. L E G A S T O ….more from me

  88. October 26, 2011 at 6:05 am

    to Raffy Hocson . . . hi , i’m wondering – and confused too – if I knew you… but your family name is very familiar to me ‘coz Vicenting Hocson is a best friend of my kuya Arthur…May I know your relation to Vicenting ,Lito,Tessie & Susan (Gana-Hocson) ? .. .Mang Eyo – my paternal Lolo – came from a poor family of Binan and as far as I knew he grew up in San Jose ( P.Paterno st ) .where most of the Legasto clan lived – but – he move further & dwelled south of Paterno st.at the corner of a callejon when he married Dolores Almarinez – and at the front of their residence stand that famed sari-sari store where-in – a decade ago after the war – a centavo of Raffy Hocson can bought 10 pieces of moderate marble size candies .Lolo Eyo’s neighbor then at that corner going to town plaza lived the GEMIL(s) and GANA(s).JIMENEZ(s) LIM-ACO(s) POTENCIANO(s),YAPTINCHAY(s) of the famed “BAHAYnaBATO” .. & the ALMEDA(s) (LUTERO)… more ……

  89. rafael hocson said,

    October 25, 2011 at 10:59 am

    lolo eyo!! i remember going to his store beside the eskinita. we would bring our centimos and he would have a lot of candies for us. this was in the mid 1950’s. i did not know he lived up to his ninetys. good happy memories

  90. October 24, 2011 at 2:39 pm

    Finally I found where I came from :)

  91. October 23, 2011 at 2:59 pm

    Thank you it`s so helpful and informative about everyone`s ancestors history and origin . But i`m so sad that although I was born in Binan Laguna our roots is still unkown . But I stil like this link and I`m going to share this to everybody concerned .

  92. October 23, 2011 at 12:49 pm

    To Cesar Carino & contributor(s) though my entrance to this blog made me sounded being a kontrabida – honestly- I was delighted when I chanced this so called ” Old Families of Binan ” … for I have had the same feelings of the so called BINANESES tracing their roots , Though unwanted allow and be w/me on creeping my past as i was among of those dirty & bare-footed street children playing patintero,tumbang preso , luksong tinik etc. around the unpainted & fenceless Rizal monument.in the midst of old plaza Binan . Nearby at the back of our hero’s monument stand the majestic bahay-kastila of the Alberto’s – whereas small space merchants sprouted like mushrooms fencing said edifice.As far as I remembered there were four giant acacia in the vicinity – where i think Jose Rizal – as a young boy – did play bcoz his mother Teodora Alonso Realonda (1827-1913) spent some part of her life at the house of the Alberto’s for they were also related. While our national hero’s father – Francisco Mercado II (1818-1898) was a truly Binaneses – born in April 18,1818 and was the youngest of 13 offspring of Juan Mercado & Cirila Perez . Still vivid on my mind my grandfather – Sergio Legasto (1877-1973) or Mang Eyo to many of our town-mates – told me that he’d met Jose Rizal many times in Binan Plaza . . . to be continued…

  93. Zaldy Alora said,

    October 18, 2011 at 4:07 pm

    Maybe someone from the lineage of the clans of the Alora, Lim-Aco, Karamihan, delos Santos, Mance, Salandanan, Guico, Almario (formerly Almaria), Garcia, Karunungan, Jimenez, etc., can share your story. One of the former classmate of our national hero Dr. Jose Rizal under the tutelage of Maestro Justiano Cruz had a Salandanan’s last name but in the record, it was Culandanan. Can someone shed the light? Thanks.

  94. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 11, 2011 at 4:17 pm

    To Edgardo Legasto, this blog was not meant to make people feel slighted. The Legastos are one of the prominent clans in Binan but since the writer of this blog is not from binan.he unintentionally missed out your clan. My sister in law is a Legasto and Potenciano by blood and i believe you are related to her. Please share with us the history of your family for this will be very much appreciated.

  95. October 11, 2011 at 1:41 am

    Ennie Harrison- I read the post from Edgardo Legasto from October 2011. I am so very glad you are sharing the information. Of course there are other “old families” with different names other than the DONS and DONYAS…. rich or poor does not matter. It is just nice to know there is part of history out there and people who are interested in tracing their roots. I have always wondered why my mother is linked to the YATCOS, my mother has no clue until I read this site and was able to connect her to her ancestors. MY MOM FELT SO MUCH HAPPINESS TO finally figured out why they visited “bahay na bato” for the HOLIDAYS. My mother did not know her grandmother Margarita R. Yatco- she passed away early when her only daughter Socorro Yatco Capili was a toddler. And Socorro passed away when my mother was in her early teens. They did not talk about family links then- they just know they are related.

    To Edgardo Legasto- My mother’s great grandmother is “Legasto”. We are linked to Capili, Amoranto, Manzo and many more. And many of these names are somehow linked to Gana, Yatco, Reyes and etc by marriage.

    And now I am looking at “Legasto” name… how many Legasto I met before are my relatives and did not even know about it. I know one thing for sure: Francisco Legasto is related to my mom. If anyone know him- he used to be the LATERO SA PALENGKE. His only child is Cita (Yatco-Bayabo) Legasto -Mercado.

    It would be so great to see someone who can share their family information just like this site. Perhaps: OLD FAMILY OF BINAN part II.
    FAMILIES ARE FOREVER. RICH OR POOR IT DOES NOT MATTER.

  96. Cesar Carino said,

    October 10, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    Toto,

    I found this website: http://pinoygenealogy.wordpress.com/2010/04/24/jose-rizals-family-tree/.

    The website has all the names of the 13 children of Don Juan Mercado, father of Francisco Mercado Rizal, and Jose Rizal’s grandfather. It was said that Bonifacia Mercado, who was married to Ysidro Yatco, was a sister of Francisco Mercado Rizal. On the Website’s list of children, her name did not appear as one of them. If the information is correct, it means that Bonifacia’s relationship to the Mercado Rizal is yet to be established.

    These are the names of the children of Juan Mercado: Gavino, Potenciana, Leoncio, Fausto, Barcelisa (she married Hermenegildo Austria), Gabriel, Julian, Gregorio Fernando, Casimiro, Petrona (she married Gregorio Neri), Tomasa (she married F. de Guzman), Cornelia, and Francisco (he married Teodora Alonzo, daughter of Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo and Brigida de Quintos).

    The website also contains the ancestry of Jose Rizal in China.

    Again this is the website: http://pinoygenealogy.wordpress.com/2010/04/24/jose-rizals-family-tree/
    Thanks.

    Cesar Carino

  97. Cesar Carino said,

    October 9, 2011 at 6:05 pm

    To: Edgardo Legasto,

    Re: entry October 7, 2011 at 11:37 am and October 8, 2011 at 12:34 pm

    As disappointing to you as it may seem, I am really glad that you were able to visit this blog and was able to tell us how you feel. I am hoping that there are things that you wanted to share which would add and expand the contents of this blog, to include those vital information that you indicated, that we did not know about. It would be greatly appreciated if you do so. Many of us, are very much interested to learn about the Legasto Family Tree and about those families that you mentioned. Let us honor the legacy of our departed love ones, please share it with us. There would always be someone who could benefit, if you do.

    Thanks.

    Cesar Carino

  98. October 8, 2011 at 12:34 pm

    to the above mentioned chronologist ” The Families of old Binan” do you have an idea that ff. families existed too in the early spanish era in our beloved hometown Binan …..LEGASTO….AMA …VERACRUZ…PEREZ…AMABA …AMBAS…KARAMIHAN…KARUNUNGAN ALONTE … CURABO … just asking ! !

  99. Edgardo Villanueva Legasto said,

    October 7, 2011 at 11:37 am

    I was very very Disappointed on reading these so called ” The Families of Old Binan ” . . . coz it yields that only those Clans ( Dons & Donyas) – mentioned – existed in Binan during the years recorded . ahh maybe it is because my great-great grandfather – Melencio Legasto ,whose Children Paula.Sergio & Vivencio Legasto came from poor family … ahhhh yes maybe the spanish blood of illustrados still exits upon the mind of the contributor of the so called ” The Families of Old Binan….Edgardo Legasto – son of Octavio Legasto, son Of Sergio Legasto,Son Of Melencio Legasto PobLacion Binan Laguna. .

  100. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 2, 2011 at 3:34 pm

    To TITO CESAR CARINO, I CHANCED UPON THE NAMES DON TEODORO YATCO AND PAULA CALDERON YATCO DE VARELA IN THE INTERNET. CAN YOU HELP ME FIND OUT WHICH BRANCH OF THE YATCO CLAN ARE THEY FROM. DON TEODORO YATCO WAS IN THE LIST OF ATTENDEES IN THE DECLARATION OF PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE ALONG WITH DON GUIDO YAPTINCHAY AND DON PASTOR LOPEZ DELEON.

  101. Noni Agulto said,

    October 1, 2011 at 6:48 am

    Hello to Ms. Ennie!

    Great to have you here in Toto’s site. Will tell my parents you said hi!

    cheers

    Noni

  102. Cesar Carino said,

    September 25, 2011 at 11:55 am

    On my entry dated June 10, 2011 at 11:07pm,

    It says “On Juan Dimas Yatco and 2nd wife, Marcela Laurel (Chirstopher Yatco, dated June 8, 2011), their son, Alfredo Leon Yatco married Jacinta Flores, on 1923 in Alaminos, Laguna”, please note that Juan was a typing error, what I was trying to say was Jose Dimas Yatco and 2nd wife, Marcela Laurel……. again please note that Juan was an error and do not exist.

    Jose Dimas Yatco was one of the sons of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomez. Thanks.

  103. September 25, 2011 at 8:49 am

    Just Hello to Noni Agulto- pleasant surprise, I cannot figure out who your parents are, but with continuous reading this site and following your name brought smiles. Say Hello to your parents Virginia Granado-Agulto and your father Mario Agulto. Your mom was my teacher in Santa Catalina (Class ’70) and your dad was a good friend to my brother Lito. Your aunt Gregoria my high school friend. Take note also- your grandfather Pedro was a great man- he was our beloved “cartero” who took the time to make people feel special as he handed mail to them.
    My name is Ennie Harrison (maiden name Iluzada) from San Antonio. For many years I am in search of my great grandmother’s parent’s names. It was only this week I come across a post made by Antonio C. Cuyegkeng as follows: Manuel and Vicenta Reyes had 2 children, a girl, Laureana, married Teryo Bayabo, and a son, Jose, who married Trinidad Belizario.
    This paragraph caught my eyes for specific reasons: marriage between Jose Bayabo and Trinidad Belizario – I know both of them; Laureana married to Teryo Bayabo- their names are known to me, and the mention of Manuel and Vicenta Reyes had 2 children made me react in excitement.
    As you know, the Laureana Yatco and Teryo (Eloterio) Bayabo house is still standing. Your mother knows exactly where the house is located.
    But, JOSE BAYABO is not a sibling to Laureana; JOSE (Pepe) Bayabo is Laureana and Teryo’s son.
    I am most interested in finding out how Mr. Cuyegkeg linked Laureana with Manuel Yatco and Vicenta Reyes- because if the relationship “child-Parents” is confirmed, Laureana ‘s siblings can be linked also. THESE ARE THE SIBLING:
    1. MARTA YATCO (single)
    2. LAUREANA YATCO married Eloterio (Teryo) Bayabo; MGA ANAK NI Eloterio Bayabo at Laureana Yatco : Jose, Antonio, and (one son died), Beatriz (Chiz)married Dr. Mariano Faraon, Luz -single , Pilar married Francisco Legasto, Encarnacion (Chong)-single, Remedios ( Meding) married Vicente Manzo.
    3. Roman Yatco moved to Santa Cruz- and we do not know who he married
    4. Margarita Yatco (the youngest) married Juan Legasto Capili from Malaban. Margarita and Juan had a daughter Socorro, my maternal grandmother.
    *So if Laureana is indeed Manuel Yatco and Vicenta Reyes daughter, they the other children can now be accounted for. Manuel and Vicenta had 4 children. If this realtionship is confirmed, my quest since 4th grade (1964) is complete.

  104. September 24, 2011 at 9:37 am

    To Cesar Carino,
    Thank you for sharing this article. In my excitement about a family link, I did not realize how many misspells I made. :)

  105. September 24, 2011 at 9:34 am

    I am most interested to contact Antonio C. Cuyegkeng regarding his post dated July 6, 2011:
    Manuel and Vicenta Reyes had 2 children, a girl, Laureana, married Teryo Bayabo, and a son, Jose, who married Trinidad Belizario.

    Laureana Yatco and Eleuterio Bayabo- these are the parents of Jose Bayabo (former LSEI teacher) married to Trinidad Belizario.

    These are the siblings:
    Marta Yatco- single
    Margarita Yatco who married Juan Capili of Malabon
    Laureana Yatco who married Eleuterio Bayabo
    Roman Yatco- moved to Santa Cruz.

    For many years, I have not been able to find their parents. I am most interested in how you found the names Manuel Yatco and Vicenta Reyes, because if there is a record that Laureana was the daughter of Manuel and Vicenta, I can definitely say… the link is found. I am most thankful to Cesar for sharing this article with me.

    Ennie Harrison

  106. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    September 9, 2011 at 4:06 am

    Hi Toto,

    This is a continuation of my search into family surnames mentioned in your main section of “The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna”.

    But first and foremost, I would like to thank Cesar Cariño and Noni Agulto for the research they have been doing to document the heritage of the families of Old Biñan. The information they have uncovered fills a lot of gaps in the family stories that have been handed down.

    As to the parents of Ignacio and Maria Carrillo-Trinidad, (Maria, I assume to be the wife of Yap Tin Chay) how are they related to Andres Carrillo-Trinidad married to Romana Santa Ana Asuncion (Cesar Cariño 08/16/11)?

    As to the siblings of Jose Faraon Alzona (Shonee Alzona Henry 08/24/11), the 1998 Yaptinchay family tree of Nena Yaptinchay Zamora, under the descendants of Simeona Yaptinchay Yatco, listed the names of the 12 children, and their spouses, of Ponciano Yatco Alzona and Macaria Faraon had 12 children. Not is Shonee’s list is Moises Faraon Alzona, the 8th child with no identified spouce, if any. There is also no Generoso F. Alzona listed, but a Generosa Faraon Alzona, the 3rd child, and married to Romano Maso.

    Thanks also to Lucy Francisco Borromeo for expanding the Vicente Ocampo Gana and Betty Chuidian lineage and to Christopher Yatco and Manuel Yatco Villanueva providing more info on the Asuncion family.

    Considering that the first names of our ancestors are spelled in different ways depending on the document and source and the way they have been changing their family names, it will be appreciated it if both first names and nick names are used in making contributions.

    Regards.

    Tony

    ************************************

    MERCADO

    As of comment 250 of September 1, 2011, there has been no information that will expound the Mercado family identified in the main section. Where are the other Mercado family line/s other than the one that was changed to Rizal as a result of the Claveria decree? For example, what is the ancestry of Mariano Mercado married Romana Gana and parents of Ramon Gana Mercado married to Ma. Paz (Pacita) Almeda Casas?

    MERCADO – – -> RIZAL

    According to Dr. Eusebio L. Koh (Cesar Cariño 06/03/11), the ancestry of Jose Rizal started with Lam-co, a Chinese immigrant from the Chinchew district in the Fokien Province in China. After being baptized Domingo Lam-co and marrying Inez De La Rosa, they had one of their children baptized, Francisco Mercado, after a family friend, Friar Francisco Marquez, and Mercado to denote a merchant.

    Francisco De La Rosa Mercado married Bernarda Monicha and their eldest son Juan married Cirila Alejandra Siong-co. Juan and Cirila Mercado had 3 children, Potenciana, Bonifacia, and youngest Francisco Engracio Mercado y Alejandra.

    Did the family name of Cirila Alejandra Siong-co become Alejandra in a similar manner that the surname of the children of Paterno Joseph San Augustine Molo became Joseph Paterno.

    There is no information on the status and/or descendants of Potenciana. Bonifacia married Isidro Marfori Yatco and her descendants can be found in the Yatco and the Yaptinchay family trees.

    Due to the Claveria decree, Francisco Engracio Mercado y Alejandra adopted Rizal, originally Ricial, meaning “the green of young growth or green fields”. However, the changed caused confusion in the business community, forcing Francisco to use Rizal Mercado or simply Mercado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Rizal).

    Considering that Bonifacia is older than Francisco, Bonifacia could have already been married to Isidro Yatco by the time Governor General Narciso Clavería y Zaldúa issued a decree on November 21, 1849. Did Bonifacia, therefore, bothered to change her surname from Mercado to Rizal, considering that she would have already been known by then as Bonifacia Yatco?

    There is no indication that Bonifacio Alejandra Mercado married to Isidro Marfori Yatco ever adopted “Rizal” as part of her surname (Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias 03/22/11). This raises the question of whether there is a Yatco-Rizal line, or should it be a Yatco-Mercado line?

    Francisco Engracio Rizal Mercado y Alejandro married Teodora De Quintos Alonzo Realonda. They had 11 children, of which Jose Protacio Rizal Mercado y Alonzo Realonda was the 2nd son and 7th child.

    It was upon enrolling at the Ateneo Municipal de Manila, José dropped the Mercado, at the advice of his brother, Paciano Rizal Mercado, and the Rizal Mercado family, thus rendering his name as “José Protasio Rizal” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Rizal).
    .
    As Juan Monchica Mercado married Cirila Alejandra Siong-co had only 1 son and Paciano Alonzo Realonda Rizal Mercado had no know son, the patrilineal line of Domingo Lam-co and the surname Rizal Mercado ended with Paciano.

    The other siblings of Paciano and Jose are women.

    Of the women, Maria married Daniel Cruz and had 2 children, Mauricio and Encarnacion. Nothing is known of the descendants of Encarnacio. Mauricio had at least 2 children, Ismael and the wife of Vladimir Gonzalez (Enrique Bustos 02/20/11). Maybe Enrique can provide the name the wife of Maurico and the other children.

    The eldest son, Ismael, married Carmen Francisco Guerrero and they have 2 children, Gemma Guerrero Cruz and Ismael G. Cruz, Jr., a stockbroker. Years after the death of Ismael, Tita Chitang married Angel Nakpil. It is with this family name that she is now more known, Carmen “Chitang” Nakpil.

    ALONZO

    The mother of Jose Protacio Rizal Mercado y Alonzo, Teodora De Quintos Alonzo, is the great granddaughter of Gregorio Alonzo. Teodora’s grandfather, Cipriano married Maria Florentina Alejandro. Cipriano and Maria Alonzo had 3 children, Lorenzo Alberto, another son that became a priest, and Isabel, who married a Sanchez De Carabaca.

    A daughter of Isabel Alonzo Sanchez De Carabaca married Guido Gana Yaptinchay. Her descendants are found the Yaptinchay family tree.

    The father of Teodora De Quintos Alonzo, Lorenzo Alberto Alejandro Alonzo, could not marry her mother, Brigida De Quintos, having been married earlier to Paula Florentino of Vigan, Ilocos Sur, Teodora, making Teodora and her siblings being classified as illegitimate children of Lorenzo Alonzo.

    Lorenzo Alberto Alejandro Alonzo had no known offspring with Paula Florentina. He had 5 children with Brigida De Quintos. Teodora was the second and the youngest was Jose Alberto. There are known information of the 3 other children of Lorenzo Alonzo and Brigida De Quintos.

    The surname Alonzo was changed to Realonda under the Claveria decree. But Teodora and her siblings did not seem to use the said surname. For failure to use her “Hispanicized” surname, Realonda de Rizal, instead of Alonzo, Teodora was made to walk fifty kilometers to Sta. Cruz, Laguna, during her trial for the attempted poising of Teodroa Formoso, wife of Jose Alberto (http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php?title=Rizal_Family; Mga Lihim ng Pamilya ni Rizal by Howie Severino 01/21/10; Enrique Bustos 12/06/10).

    With the marriage of Teodora De Quintos Alonzo to Francisco Engracio Rizal Mercado y Alejandro, theoretically ended the patrilineal line of Gregorio Alonzo.

    ALBERTO

    The line ended theoretically because, indications are, that the known brother of Teodora De Quintos Alonzo, Jose Alberto De Quintos Alonzo changed his family name to Alberto to become a Knight of the Order of Queen Isabella the Catholic, as the title can only be inherited by a legitimate son (Enrique Bustos 02/05/11).

    To assume the title and privilege, Jose Alberto De Quintos Alonzo was supposed to have declared himself (with the approval of his siblings) the legitimate son of Lorenzo Alberto Alejandro Alonzo and Paula Florentino (Mga Lihim ng Pamilya ni Rizal by Howie Severino 01/21/10). As in the case of Paterno Joseph San Augustine Molo (above), Jose Alberto De Quintos Alonzo became Jose Florentino Alberto.

    From available information, it seems that Jose Florentino Alberto and Teodora Formoso had only 1 child, Zoilo. Zoilo Formoso Alberto married Pilar Marco, the daughter of Isabel Marco (Noni Agulto 02/19/10).

    Zoilo and Pilar Alberto had 4 sons. Nothing is known about the children, except for the youngest Gerry due to his sale of the Alberto ancestral home in Biñan.

  107. Cesar Carino said,

    September 1, 2011 at 9:56 pm

    Shonee, the church record that I have shows he was christened on Nov. 21, 1888, in Biñan, Laguna. The 1887 date on the family search website that you are referring to is an estimate of his birth date based on how old they say he was when he died. The dates that we have are very close. I’ve heard stories that he also lived in Alaminos, Laguna. I am based here in Toledo, Ohio, my email is csrino@msn.com. Glad to know you will be in Manila in October, I’m sure you will have a great time.

  108. Shonee Henry said,

    September 1, 2011 at 6:32 am

    Cesar, where are you based? I will be in Manila from September 30 through October 17 on business and perhaps we could meet.

  109. Shonee Henry said,

    September 1, 2011 at 6:29 am

    According to the Mormon Family Search database, Ponciano Alzona was born in 1887 and died on December 25, 1943 in San Pablo City, Laguna, Philippines.

  110. Cesar Carino said,

    August 29, 2011 at 10:37 pm

    To Shonee Alzona Henry, (entry August 24, 2011)

    Great! Thanks for sharing these very valuable information on the descendants of Ponciano Alzona and Macaria Faraon. Ponciano on church record was baptist in 1888, in Binan, Laguna. He was one of the children of Jacinto Alzona and Teodora Angela Yatco. Jacinto Alzona was the son of Silvino Alzona and Circiaca Amatorio. Teodora Angela Yatco was a daughter of Miguel Dimas Yatco and Simona Yaptinchay. Miguel was the son of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes, while Simona was the daughter of Pablo YapTinChay and Maria Carrillo Trinidad.

    To Rene Resurreccion, (entry August 22, 2011)

    I have the names of Jose Almeda and Bernabela Rubio, and it shows they have 3 children, Ana, Antonia, and Pablo. Thanks for providing information on names of their additional children (Jose and Eduviges) . Ana Almeda was married and was the 2nd wife of Emeterio Yatco. I do not have further information as to the parents of Jose Almeda and Bernabela Rubio, therefore can not establish their relationship to the family of Dr. Jose Rizal. Thanks.

  111. Shonee Alzona Henry said,

    August 24, 2011 at 6:34 am

    Cesar Carino (entry August 22 2011)

    Thanks for the response! I was told that my grandfather’s name was spelled with a c as in Ponciano but I could be wrong. Following are the names of the children of Macaria Faraon Alzona and Ponciano Yatco Alzona and not in necessary order.

    Honesto F. Alzona
    Generoso F. Alzona
    Sarnidad F.Alzona Hernandez
    Jose F.Alzona married to Consolacion L. Munozco
    Estrella F. Alzona never married
    Virgina F. Alzona
    Cesar F. Alzona
    Purisima F. Alzona Ticzon
    Adelaida F. Alzona
    Teofila F. Alzona Matibag
    Susan F. Alzona married to Felix Reyes Jr.

    Consolacion L. Munozco and Jose F. Alzona clan

    Virgilio Alzona married to Leticia Paterno (Temecula, CA)
    Children: Jojo Alzona Bautista, Gigi Alzona Carling, Victoria Alzona, Gerard Alzona

    Carlito Alzona (San Diego, CA)
    Children: Michael Alzona, Christopher Alzona, Alan Alzona, Shawn Alzona

    Bernardita Alzona married to Henry Naguit (Sydney, Australia)
    Children: Kirstin Naguit

    Karmen Alzona married to Harold Smiley (San Diego, CA)
    Children: Steven Smiley

    Asuncion Alzona married to Richard Henry (Poway San Diego County, CA)
    Children: Benjamin Albert Henry, Alexander Julian Henry, Emily Henry

    Jose Alzona Jr. married to Margie Skirett (Costa Mesa, CA)
    Children: Erin Alzona, Jenna Alzona

    Wilfredo Alzona married to Lisa Vitug (Poway San Diego County, CA)
    Children: Shannon Alzona, Sheena Alzona, and Shane Alzona

    Ma. Veronica Alzona (twin) married to Scott McGinnis (Chula Vista, CA)
    Children: Ryan McGinnis, Katie McGinnis

    Ma. Teresa Alzona (twin) married to Gareth Troyer (Indiana)
    Children: Mason Troyer, Landon Troyer, Hayley Troyer

    I will encourage my relatives to post their respective family members.

  112. August 23, 2011 at 9:21 am

    Hi Toto:
    Thanks for your message. Lucy Francisco-Borromeo gave me a copy of your write-up on Mr. Emilio Reyes and Irene Almeda. It was very informative. I edited it a bit and corrected a few things. I want to give you a copy of my edited version. Can you give me your email address.

    Rex Resurreccion

  113. August 22, 2011 at 1:51 pm

    Historical documents state that Eduviges Almeda of Binan, Laguna, wife of Higino Francisco of Binondo, Manila was a “close relative of Dr. Jose Rizal” (Gwekch, Hall of Fame, 1968) and “related to the Mercados of Binan” (The Free Press, 1953). Can you kindly explain how exactly Eduviges Almeda is related? Jose Carlos Almeda I married Bernabela Rubio (both of Binan) and they had many children, two of whom were Jose Rubio Almeda II and Eduviges Almeda. Jose Rubio Almeda II married Josefa Mendoza and had a son Jose Mendoza Almeda III of Binan, married to Fausta Almeda Francisco of Manila. They had 4 children, the eldest of whom was Irene Almeda of Binan. Can you please explain the exact relationship of my Lola Eduviges Almeda to Dr. Jose Rizal? Thank you.

  114. August 22, 2011 at 11:33 am

    Rex:

    Hi cousin, great to see you here!!!

    Best regards to Dr. Ray R., who was my good friend and batchmate at La Salle Greenhills [ class of 1984 ].

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  115. August 22, 2011 at 8:26 am

    Do you have any information on my ancestors from Binan, Laguna: Jose Almeda I married Bernabela Rubio; their children Jose Almeda II and Eduviges Almeda. Jose Almeda II married Josefa Mendoza; their son Jose Almeda III who married Fausta Francisco; their children Irene Almeda, Purisima, Tolstoi and Pilar. And how are the Eduviges Almedas related to Francisco Mercado of Binan, Laguna, the father of Dr. Jose Rizal?
    Do you have any information on my ancestors from Binan, Laguna: Jose Almeda I married Bernabela Rubio; their children Jose Almeda II and Eduviges Almeda. Jose Almeda II married Josefa Mendoza; their son Jose Almeda III who married Fausta Francisco; their children Irene Almeda, Purisima, Tolstoi and Pilar. And how are the Eduviges Almedas related to Francisco Mercado of Binan, Laguna, the father of Dr. Jose Rizal?

  116. Cesar Carino said,

    August 22, 2011 at 6:25 am

    @ Shonee, (entry August 19, 2011)

    Great that you found this blog and very nice to know that Ponciano Alzona was your grandfather (if it’s the same Pontiano that we are talking about), then you are related to, and have a lot of extended relatives in the Alzona, Yaptinchay, and Yatco Clan of Biñan. Pontiano Alzona was the son of Jacinto Alzona and Teodora Angela Yatco, therefore great grandson of Don Pablo YapTinChay and Don Marcos Dimas Yatco. Thanks you very much for sharing with us the names of your parents and grandmother. If you have additional information about names of brothers and sisters of you father, Jose Faraon Alzona, please share it with us, to be added to the family tree. Thanks you very much and hope to hear from you soon.

    @ Noni; (entry August 19,2011)

    Great entry! Thanks for the information, it really did cleared up a lot of thing and explained the name and background of Doña Augustina, and why she was registered in church records as Sanchez. I think you are very right with your assumption, when I looked again at what I have, I just learned that on Agustin Yaptinchay’s baptismal record his mother was listed as Augustina Sanchez, then later on his marriage with Francisca Amoranto, the civil record shows his mother as Agustina Alberto. It was within that time period when the family nam change occurs. It would be nice to have a picture of her tombstone just for record purposes. When I went to the cemetery in Canlalay years back, I was not able to locate her tombstone or even lolo Guido’s at the Yaptinchay mausoleum.

    Your entry on the Alberto’s was also very very interesting, it shows the relationship of Agustina’s suppose to be grandmother, Isabel Alonzo Sanchez, to the Alberto’s or Alonzo’s, as well as to Rizal’s mother Teodora Alonzo. This name change business is getting to be very confusing, it seems the Alberto’s were guilty of it too, their family name seems to evolved from, Alonzo, to Alberto-Alonzo, then dropped Alonzo, to be just, Alberto. On my ancestral file I have Teodora Alberto Alonzo Realonda, daughter of Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo (source was also Austin Craig). Then from you, I now learned that Lorenzo’s father was Cypriano Alonzo, son of Gregorio Alonzo. Thanks for the great entry.

  117. Noni Agulto said,

    August 19, 2011 at 7:32 am

    The oldest traceable Alberto was Gregorio Alonzo who headed the parian at San Jose de Trozo (Manila) (According to Doc Bimbo Sta Maria)
    His son, Cypriano (married to Maria Florentina) moved to Binan and became capitan in 1790 and 1802
    Cypriano had 3 children, Lorenzo ( married to Brigida de Quintos) , Isabel ( married to a Sanchez) and a priest (unamed) – from austin craig

    From Lorenzo’s line comes Teodora Alonzo and Jose Rizal, and Don Jose Alberto Alonzo and his descendants- the current owners of the Alberto mansion.
    From Isabel’s line comes Agustina Alberto -Yaptinchay and all her descendants

  118. Noni Agulto said,

    August 19, 2011 at 6:36 am

    Hi Cesar.

    Again about Agustina Alberto – Her surname is actually Sanchez de Carabaca. She is the one said to be of Macanese lineage. It is possible that since the Alberto surname is more locally recognized, then the Yaptinchay descendants of Guido and Agustina used Alberto as their official middle name instead of Sanchez. It may also be their way of underlining the union of the 2 aristocratic lines.

    In the book Power +Faith +Image by Ricky Trota Jose, published by the Ayala Museum, there was a mention of a Biñan dame named Dona Isabel Alberto de Sanchez, and an inventory of her assests which was noted as a lot during her time (including narra beds and furniture, gold rosaries, jewelry and ivory santos). If I am not mistaken, she is the same person mentioned in Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal; Philippine Patriot, by Austin Craig.

    “Her father, Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo (born 1790, died 1854), is said to have been “very Chinese” in appearance. He had a brother who was a priest, and a sister,”ISABEL”, who was quite wealthy; he himself was also well to do. Their mother, Maria Florentina (born 1771, died 1817), was, on her mother’s side, of the famous Florentina family of Chinese mestizos originating in Baliwag, Bulacan, and her father was Captain Mariano Alejandro of Biñan.”

    Doña Isabel Alberto de Sanchez could very well be Agustina’s grandmother. Agustina’s mother is presumed to be married to a certain Señor Carabaca – thus the complete name Agustina Alberto – Sanchez de Carabaca de Yaptinchay in her tombstone at the Yaptinchay mausoleum in Biñan.

  119. Shonee Alzona Henry said,

    August 19, 2011 at 5:09 am

    Glad to have found this site. I am Shonee Alzona Henry, daughter of Consolacion L. Munozco and Jose Faraon Alzona. My father was one of the sons of Macaria Faraon and Ponciano Alzona.

  120. August 19, 2011 at 5:05 am

    Glad to have found this site. I am Shonee Alzona Henry from San Diego California. My father is Jose Faraon Alzona and is one of the sons of Ponciano Alzona who was married to Macaria Faraon. I want to relate to the #s 12 and 85 comments.

  121. Noni Agulto said,

    August 18, 2011 at 1:43 am

    Hi Cesar!

    Thanks for your reply. It’s interesting that in the records, lola Epay’s mom is Ruferta, however, in the Lapida, she is Norberta…=)so Tita nena was right to say that lola Epay was Maria’s neice. =) It’s really hard to trace when all we have are bits and pieces. I’m really excited to see how , where and who’s line (lolo tonying – dad of tito monching, tita baby and tita guia -carillo) falls into. =)

    Thank you very much for all your information. They were very useful in the documentation.

  122. Cesar Carino said,

    August 16, 2011 at 3:23 pm

    Noni, (re: your post dated Aug 16, 2011)

    This is what is on my computer’s ancestral file about Josefa Carrillo-Trinidad (lola Epay), wife of Francisco Yaptinchay: she was the daughter of Mariano Carrillo-Trinidad and Ruferta Marfil. Mariano was the son of Ignacio Carrillo-Trinidad, wife unknown. Ignacio and Maria Carrillo-Trinidad were brother and sister their parents were unknown. Francisco Yaptinchay was the son of Aguido Yaptinchay and Agustina Sanchez (note that all records on Agustina, the last name used was Sanchez not Alberto, I am not saying that she was not related to the Albertos ,but she used the last name Sanchez during her time, I will not be surprise if her father’s last name was the same).

    Tony, (re: your post dated; Aug. 7, 2011)

    There was no known maternal middle name that was used by Vicente Tang Gana, I am assuming that he was a 1st generation Chinese immigrant from China like Yap Tin Chay. His first wife’s name was unknown, and I am assuming that the wife’s last name was de los Reyes because their only son Gaspar added de los Reyes to his last name, and became Gaspar de los Reyes-Gana. His children also used the last name de los Reyes Gana during their lifetime. Gaspar’s wife was Gertrudes Santimora Roberta of Chinese descent. Vicente Tang Gana’s second wife was Tomasa Apolonia also of Chinese descent.

    On the research of Tita Nena, and Tito Leony; Vicente Tang Gana’s first wife was assumed to be Gertrudes, family name unknown. It was assumed later that Gertrudes’ family name could be de los Reyes, because their son Gaspar uses de los Reyes Gana as his family name. On their research Gaspar’s wife was completely unknown. However recent informations based on Biñan Church records indicated that Gaspar de los Reyes Gana’s wife was Gertrudes Santimora Roberta of Chinese descent. Therefore I assumed we do not know the first name of Vicente Tang Gana’s first wife (Gaspar’s mother), but her last name could be de los Reyes. Hope this clears the issue, in doing ancestral research I found out that our assumptions changes when correct information is found. That’s why we rely on vital records more than words of mouth.

    Tony, the answers to most of your questions may be hard to find because of the limited records available. We can speculate all we want but it will not answer the questions. To find the answer first hand, the key is search the records, the vital records (birth, death, marriage, military, immigration, etc).

    Thanks.

  123. noni agulto said,

    August 16, 2011 at 4:10 am

    @ Kuya tony and toto,
    I was busy doing a mapping of the Chinese families of old Binan Laguna as part of my research documentation for Cultural Heritage Studies in UST.
    It is interesting that this thread has unveiled the richest stash of information regarding all our families..unfortunately as you mentioned, only the Carillo-Trinidads are missing, considering that they are after all the core family of Biñan, Laguna.
    I talked to Tito Monching about this last time but he couldn’t show me a written document of their family tree.
    Your analysis of the Carrillos interconnections just gave me a headache this time in the morning…hehehe.
    I didn’t know that Vicente Tang-Gana was Carrillo. but given that…it might be that Maria Carrillo Trinidad was a niece of Vicente Tang -Gana.
    You may take note that Vicente is 1 generation ahead of Yap Tin Chay (husband of Maria). Unless they are of the same generation but ages apart…
    then Maria and Vicente could be cousins or even siblings…
    I remember in Tita Nena Zamora’s welcome message in the family tree, she mentioned that Lola Epay (Josefa CarrilloTrinidad) must have been a a niece of
    Maria Carrillo- Trinidad since she had great recall of the events and the stories. (from what I heard, Lolo Kiko is Lola Epay’s pamangkin in the family tree… which is not an unfamiliar case in the Yaptinchay-Gana-Carillo landscape) Which means, it is possible that her dad Mariano Carillo Trinidad, was Maria’s brother or cousin)
    Also as mentioned, Marcos Dimas Yatco (1790-1800) is the same generation as Yap Tin Chay (1780-1790) and Andres Carillo -Trinidad (Romana Sta Ana Assuncion)
    shoud be a generation younger – Maria CT must be his tia.
    Also it is interesting to know that the Gonzales house beside the San Jose capilla has Carillo- Trinidad beginnings.
    In the capilla mortuary…you will find tombstones of Maxima (i think) Carillo-Trinidad y Gana and lola epay’s parents, Mariano Carillo Trinidad y Gana and Norberta Marfil.

    I also noticed that the use of Trinidad ended with the generation of Lola Epay…the younger generation droppedTrinidad
    It is also worth noting that both Carillos from Carmona and Binan must come from the same tree since Carmona was just part of Silang, which happened to be just part of Binan back in the Days of Hacienda de San Isidro de Biñan. And most landholdings of Binan aristocrats extend to Silang and Cabuyao…
    (of which Binan was a part of before breaking away)

    All for now

    noni

    by the way toto, our publicity group is getting in touch yata with summit media regarding manila fame i don’t know lang who they are talking to. Pag nagdala sila ng tickets for Manila FAME, ipapadala ko na yjng para sa yo…hehehe

  124. August 15, 2011 at 3:36 am

    Hi tony,
    Herewith from the Philippine Studies Ateneo de manila University ‘Don Pascual de santa Ana – indio Hacendero (1762-1827) by Dr. Luciano PR Santiago, We are thankful for this historical data and relevant event from our maternal side of one of Yatco clan of Binan, again we are greatfull and thanking Dr. Santiago.

    The Governadorcillo of Pasig 1798 Don Pasqual de Santa Ana mention by Cris Yatco was our great great grandfather on maternal side and married to Dona Andrea Pablo of Pasig and the parents of Dona Remigia and Don Antonio ‘Cagalitan’ Assumpcion (1794).Don Antonio was also elected governadorcillo of Pasig 1842-1843 (second son of Don Mariano ‘Cagalitan’ Assumpcion and Dona Maria dela Paz Molo San Agustin belong to the Molo Paterno of Santa Cruz Manila) Don Antonio some time called very flattering ‘Fray Angelico Filipino’ of his soul string religious Paintings, they raise ten children.Dona Valentina the eldest married our great grandfather Ygnacio ‘Enacio’ Yatco of Binan;Dona Juliana m. Don Leoncio Bartolome;Don Ambrocio – Governadorcillo 1877-1879 (single);Don Francisco; Dona Valeriana m.Don Jose Arcina; Dona Placida m. a Pasqual.
    Don Luis governadorcillo 1883-85 married Dona Paula Bartolome; Don Esteban (single); Dona Romana (the favorite subject of her uncle ‘The master of Portrait’ Don Justiniano Asuncion) married Don Andres Carillo of Binan;and Dona Victoria m. Don Santos Jose of Pasig.

    Don Pasqual clan belong to the pre-hispanic Novility and Landed gentry of Pasig and Cainta.He was called Indio Hacendero and some time El Duke de Pasig.He aquire two hacienda ‘Hacienda de Angono’ or ‘Hacienda y Estancia de San Clemente de Angono y Lagundi’ and Isla de Talim,the area approximately of San Guilermo Teresa,Binangoonan and Present Angono town,and of this property become the subject of land controversy until to this present date..The partition of the estate of Don Pasqual among his four children Don Mariano the eldest; Don Jose; Dona Maria Salome whom he declared as his ” Sole and Universal Heirs”

  125. Christopher Yatco said,

    August 12, 2011 at 11:58 am

    Hi Tony , Remigia Santa Ana, wife of Antonio Asuncion, was from Pasig. Her father don pascual de santa ana became gobernadorcillo of pasig in 1798 .

  126. lucy francisco borromeo said,

    August 7, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    Sorry, my post isn’t clear..
    chuidian-gana siblings were eduardo – nena potenciano, paz, belen-jose castillo, telesforo-alice escaler, jose-ateta arevalo, benjamin-chi locsin, nita-serge locsin. their children follow their names.

  127. lucy francisco borromeo said,

    August 7, 2011 at 6:06 pm

    hi tony,

    i hope lito hocson can fill in the blanks, he knows more about our gana heritage…

    chuidian-gana line:

    eduardo gana-nena potenciano:
    tony gana
    baby gana-lim
    paz
    belen-jose castillo
    mari-baby tan
    bettina
    carina
    vicente- tita chan
    ramon
    mary
    telesforo-alice escaler
    marichi gana-picazo
    boboy (vicente?)
    telesforo jr
    jojo
    liza gana-gamboa
    jose-ateta arevalo
    eddie
    ramon
    jayjay
    manolo
    bobby
    tessa
    nita gana-serge locsin
    dino
    manolo
    benjamin-chi locsin
    ike
    luigi
    benjo

    Re your question” who are the other children of Lolo Potong and Lola Osay Yatco in addition to Tito Nestor and Leony? Aren’t Cesar, Ismael and Oscar, husband of Tita Duday also brothers of Nestor and Leoncio Yatco? I believe that they also have a sister who is still unmarried”.

    Tito Nesting, Leony, Oscar are brothers, but Cesar and Ismael are their cousins. Other siblings that i can remember offhand are Mario, Tony, Angela (unmarried), Lilia Yatco-Bagabaldo, Yatco-Garcia (mother of Renee), Cely

  128. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    August 7, 2011 at 3:19 pm

    Hi Toto,

    Congratulations on your web site “The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna”.

    The site has provided the current members of Biñan families, where ever they maybe, a medium for finding their ancestors and/or sharing information on one’s lineage. What I find most challenging is the shifting through the tons of data on the main section and 228 posted comments, as of July 29, 2011, to identify the relationships among the members of the various generations of each family, as well as the intermarriages among the various families.

    I am very grateful for the information provided by Cesar Cariño on the various Biñan families, particularly the Yatco clan. From Cesar Cariño’s inputs, I was to make sense and sort out the relationships among the various Yatco names that kept cropping up. The data also allowed for the identification of the intermarriages between the Yaptinnchay’s and the Yatco’s.

    Sad to say, while I have identified some intermarriage between Yaptinchay and Gana and Yatco and Gana, there is still very little information to go on in developing the expanded Gana family tree.

    CARRILLO-TRINIDAD

    The Yaptinchay family tree started when Yap Tin Chay married to Maria Carrillo-Trinidad. The Gana family tree originated from the marriage of Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana to Gertudes De Los Reyes and, then, to Tomasa Apolonia.

    On February 15, 2010, Noni Agulto said that the Biñan Carrillo’s were using the complete surname Carrillo-Trinidad, but dropped the Trinidad after an incident. Therefore, were Maria Carrillo-Trinidad and Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana related?

    Is Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana really Vicente Carrillo-Trinidad Tang-Gana? If yes, who is his mother? How is Maria Carrillo-Trinidad related to Vicente Carrillo-Trinidad Tang-Gana or to his mother? Who are the parents of Maria Carrillo-Trinidad married to Yap Tin Chay?

    If the father of Maria Carrillo-Trinidad and the mother of Vicente Carrillo-Trinidad Tang-Gana are siblings, then both the Yaptinchay and Gana lines belong to the same family tree, Carrillo-Trinidad.

    There is very little information on the Carrillo-Trinidad family lineage in the main section and up to Comment 228 dated 29 July 2011.

    The lineage of the Carrillo Trinidad on the site starts with a great granddaughter of Ming Mong Lo and Anastasia San Agustin getting married to the grandson of Mariano Kagalitan Asuncion and Maria De La Paz San Agustin Molo. Both the Molo-Paterno and the Kagalitan-Asuncion families are based in Sta. Cruz, Manila, not Biñan.

    Romana Santa Ana Asuncion, the wife of Andres Carrillo-Trinidad is the sister of Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion, who married Ignacio Gomes Yatco, son of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes (Sonny Rayos 06/11/10; Antonio Cuyegkeng 07/06/11). As Valentina and Romana Santa Ana Asuncion are already 3rd generation Molo-Paterno, and Ignacio Gomes Yatco is a 2nd generation Yatco, Andres Carrillo-Trinidad could not be in the same generation as Maria Carrillo-Trinidad and Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana.

    Andres and Romana Carillo-Trinidad had 6 children. The eldest, Petronilla, first married Fermin Yaptinchay Yatco, and, then, became the second wife of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana. Andres and Romana Carrillo-Trinidad had only one son, Joaquin, but there is not information about his descendants to continue the Carrillo-Trinidad family name. According to Jess Vera Cruz (10/06/10), Joaquin and family settled in Kalilayan (now Unisan), Tayabas (now Quezon).

    The next set of Carrillo’s in the site were no longer using Carrillo-Trinidad.

    Two daughters of Gaspar de los Reyes Gana, a second generation Gana, and Gertrudes Santimora Roberta married Carrillos. The older daughter, Francisca, married Juan Carrillo and the younger one, Donata, married Ambrosio Carrillo. The relationship between Juan and Ambrosio has not been established.

    On June 23, 2011, John Paul Cariño Carrillo posted in the “bulanobserver.wordpress.com” that his great-great-grandparents were Juan Carillo-Trinidad and Francisca Gana. Francisca Gana was identified due to the initals “F.G.” in the panyo she was holding in the painting by Justinianao Molo Asuncion that used to hang in their ancestral home in Biñan.

    Since Romana Santa Ana Asuncion, the wife of Andres Carrillo-Trinidad, is the niece of Justinianao Molo Asuncion, could Juan Carrillo-Trinidad, then, be the grandson of Andres and Romana Carillo-Trinidad? Is he the son of Joaquin Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad?

    Hopefully, John Paul Cariño Carrillo, who also accesses The Families of Old Biñan, Laguna site can give us more information on his lineage and probably link himself to Jess Vera Cruz of Kalilayan, Quezon.

    SURNAMES

    It would be interesting to know what caused the Biñan Carrillo’s to drop Trinidad from their surname (Noni Agulto 02/15/10). In a similar manner, why did the descendants of Marcos Dimas Yatco remove Dimas from their surname in the late 1800 (Cesar Cariño 07/29/11). Why did the children of Vicente C. Tang-Gana stopped using Tang as part of their surname? Why did Mercado disappear from the Mercado-Rizal surname?

    Or, could it be that our ancestors simply decided to do away with the Spanish system of using the paternal surname followed by maternal surname as their surname. Could it be Tang y Gana, becoming Tang-Gana, then why Gana, instead of Tang?

    GANA

    Other than the lineage in the main section, there has been minimal contribution that expands the line of Gertudez De Los Reyes, the first wife of Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana.

    As to the line of Tomasa Apolonia, the second wife of Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana, perhaps Lucy Francisco Borromeo and/or Noni Agulto can expand the Vicente Ocampo Gana and Betty Chuidian lineage. Vicente Ocampo Gana is the second son of Eduardo and Filomena Ocampo.

    The late Antonio Gana was the son of Eduardo Gana and Nena Potenciano, grandchild of Vicente Ocampo Gana and Betty Chuidian (Lucy Francisco Borromeo 05/19/11).

    Maybe Rina Gana-Telen (02/09/11) can expound more on the ancestry of her grandfather Agapito German Gana, considering that Ciriaco Potenciano Gana, married 2 German’s, Leonarda and Francisca. There is no mention as to whether Leonarda and Francisca are related.

    Judge Milagros German is a fifth generation Gana also from line of Tomasa Apolonia, the second wife of Vicente Carrillo Tang-Gana.

    To Ramon Cariño.

    Your ancestry begins with Marcos Dimas Yatco married Maria Juana Gomes. One of their children, Gregorio married a Marfori and had a child called Ysidro, who married Bonifacia Alejandra Mercado-Rizal. The union bore 3 daughters, one of which is Maria Salud married to Pablo Tiongco Perlas. Pablo Perlas is the son of Pedro Perlas married to Natalia Tiongco of Santa Rosa, Laguna (Cesar Cariño 09/01/10).

    Missed you at the Cafe Ysabel book launch of Tess Lopez last 16 July 2011.

    Regards.

    Tony

  129. Cesar Carino said,

    July 29, 2011 at 4:08 am

    To Ramon Carino,

    I am just one of the contributors to this blog, and we thank our host Toto Gonzalez for providing us a forum where we could communicate and participate. I do not have your email address, however if you want to contact me, send it to csrino@msn.com. I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    To Tony,

    Thanks for your comments, and your interest in the families of old Binan. Here are some clarifications which may answer some of your concern (post dated July 6, 2011).

    — On Fermin and Petronilla Trinidad’s children, the source of the 2nd child Macario was Sonny Rayos posting dated June 11, 2010.

    — Maria was a child of Pasquala and Lazaro Velasco; she was baptist in 1896, in Binan. Adding those 2 other children on Tita Nena’s list would makes it 5, they are Monica, Ygnacio, Maria, Salome, and Dolores

    –Leandro Alzona was the name on the marriage record with Gaudencia Velarde, he was also known as Alejandro in his later years. I choose Leandro because that was the name that shows in the earliest record found. In searching for our love ones the name earliest on record is closest to the real given name, example was Alberto Yaptinchay whose name became Crisberto in later records after his passing, Emiterio Yatco was the name on record, yet even today his decendants refer to him and insist that his name was Eleuterio.

    –Ponciano was the name on record baptist in 1888.

    –Nazario was married to Candida Gana, (Cadida was typing error that you missed)

    Just found another child for Miguel Dimas Yatco and Simona Yaptinchay, Nicolasa Yatco married to Andres Laseano on 1889 in Binan.

    I think Dimas-Yatco was the family name used by Marcos Dimas-Yatco and his children during their time. Dimas was later dropped in the late 1800. If what was said was true, the Dimas-Yatco’s were a very wealthy family in Old Binan.

  130. Ramon R Carino Jr. said,

    July 25, 2011 at 11:25 pm

    Hello Cesar Carino, I am looking for more information on the family line of “Maria Salud Yatco de Perlas of which my family is a descendant. Can you email me and lets talk? I find your site to be very helpful in understanding my heritage.

    Regards,

    Ray Carino

  131. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    July 6, 2011 at 5:53 pm

    YATCO

    The Yatco’s of Biñan can trace their ancestry to either Marcos Dimas Yatco or Pedro Dimas Yatco. Until the relationship between Marcos and Pedro can be established, the 2 Yatco lines will have to remain.

    Of the 2 families, the line of Marcos would be more identified with Biñan, as his, Marcos, descendants have intermarried with the old Gana and Yaptinchay families of Biñan. Other than 2 great grandchildren of Pedro by his second wife, Eusebia Belan, getting married to the great great grandchildren of Marcos through his son, Ignacio married to Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion, there is no mention of the descendants of Pedro Dimas Yatco marrying into other Biñan old families.

    Marcos Dimas Yatco married Maria Juana Gomes. They had 6 children, Miguel (Aniceto), who used Dimas as his middle name instead of Gomes, married Simeona/Simona Trinidad Yaptinchay, the second child and eldest daughter of Yap Tin Chay (Pablo Yaptinchay) and Maria Carrillo-Trinidad the founders’ of the Yaptinchay clan; Silvina married to Marcelo De La Paz; Manuel married to Vicenta Reyes; Jose, who also used Dimas as his middle name, had Hilaria De Castro as first wife and Marcela Laurel vda. de Tapia as his second wife; Ignacio married to Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion; and Gregorio, whose wife is currently unidentified.

    Miguel (Aniceto) and Simeona/Simona Dimas Yatco had 5 children: the eldest, Petrona married a Rotea; Fermin first married Petronilla Asuncion Carrillo-Trinidad, granddaughter of Antonio Molo Asuncion and Remigia Sant Ana, who later on became the second wife of Jesualdo Potenciano Gana, then Paulina Rosales; Pascaula (Pasquala) married Lazaro Velasco and whose brother, Pablo, married Pascuala’s sister, Maria; and Teodora Angela married Juanito Alzona.

    Thanks to Nena Yatinchay Zamora, the family of Miguel (Aniceto) Dimas Yatco married to Simeona Trinidad Yaptinchay is documented up to the 7th generation for some of the children.

    Not much is known about the offspring of Silvina Gomes Yatco and Marcelo De La Paz.

    Manuel and Vicenta Reyes had 2 children, a girl, Laureana, married Teryo Bayabo, and a son, Jose, who married Trinidad Belizario.

    Jose had a son, Justo, who married an Amoranto, with Hilaria De Castro, and another child with Marcela Laurel Tapia, Alfredo Leon married to Jacinta Flores.

    Ignacio and Valentina Gomes Yatco had 4 children: Eluterio (Emiterio), who had 3 wives, first being Maria Carillo, then Ana Almeda, and finally, Fernanda Evangelista; Jose married to Victoria Carlos Almeda; Leoncio married to Ysidora Faustorino Cruz; and Filomena married to Eugenio Alzona.

    Eluterio (Emiterio) Santa Ana Yatco had only one child with both Maria Carrillo, a daughter, Sor Felicidad Carrillo Yatco, and another daughter with Ana Almeda, Leonila Almeda Yatco.

    Eluterio (Emiterio) Santa Ana Yatco had 7 children with Fernanda Evangelista: Domingo married Maria San Luis; Roque married a certain Margarita; Maria; Primo married Baldomera Reyes; Brigida married Gavino Carino; Asuncion married Teodora Tanalega; and Francisco married Asuncion Belizario.

    Jose “Coseng” and Victoria Yatco had 8 children: Maria married Juan Geronimo; Ignacio married Isidra Carrillo Guico, granddaughter of Pedro Guico and Isabel Trinidad Yaptinchay; Felicidad; Salud; Marciana married Jose Alzona; Bernardo married “Lelang Bulag” Amoranto, granddaughter of Jose Apolonia Gana and Regina Maravillas Custodio; Sixta married Estanislao Padua; and Rafaela married to Ciriaco Alzona, son of Juanito Alzon and Teodora Angela Yaptinchay Yatco.

    Leoncio and Ysidora Yatco had 7 children: Lutgarda; Isabel; Yrineo; Francisco married Josefa Gonzales; Jose married Generosa Cruz Gana, daughter of Jesualdo Gana and his first wife, Crisanta Faustorino Cruz; Mariano S. married Raymunda Yaptinchay Almeda, daughter of Andres Almeda and Maria Gana Yaptinchay; and Lucas.

    Filomena and Eugenio Alzona had 3 children: Jose, who married twice, first to Adriana Punzalan and then to Adriana Yatco; Agrifino Alzona; and Cayo married Emilia Amoranto, daughter of Maximo Amoranto and Isabel Custodio Gana. Jose had 4 children with Adriana Punzalan and another 10 children with Adriana Yatco.

    Gregorio married a Marfori and had a child called Ysidro, who married Bonifacia Alejandra Mercado-Rizal. The union bore 3 daughters, the “Tres Marias de Yatco”, Maria Salud married to Pablo Perlas, Maria Paz married to Edilberto Arevalo Ocampo, and Maria Leonila married to Pablo Gana Yaptinchay, son of Alberto Trinidad Yaptinchay and Macaria Gana.

    On the next generation, 2 of the children of Jose and Generosa Yatco, Nestor and Leoncio married into the Gana and the Alberto T. Yaptinchay families. Nestor married Tomasa Toribio Gana, while Leoncio married Leticia Luna Yaptinchay.

    Two of the children of Jose Alzona and Marciana Almeda Yatco, Purificacion and Cesar married descendants of Pedro Dimas Yatco and Eusebia Belan. Purification married to German C. Yatco and Cesar married Alicia C. Yatco, children of Felix Depante Yatco and Urbana Castrillo.

  132. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    July 6, 2011 at 5:49 pm

    Dear Toto,

    Our June 4, 2011 Yatco posting had elicited a lot of more information on the Yatco family tree. With the additional information provided by Cesar Cariño, Manuel Yatco Villanueva, and Christopher Yatco, please find attached a more descriptive Yatco family tree. The names of the Yatco family members used in the attached file were primarily from the records of Cesar Cariño.

    The attached family tree begins with Marcos Dimas Yatco married Maria Juana Gomes, the grandparents of Ysidro Yatco, father of the “Tres Marias de Yatco” and the start of the Yatco’s of Biñan, as defined in the main section of The Families of Old Biñan.

    The main Yatco section of The Families of Old Biñan also talks of 2 families that were intertwined with the Yatco’s of Biñan, the Asuncion-Molo and the Alzona families.

    While a descendant of the “Kagalitan” to “Assumpcion” to “Asuncion” and the “Ming Mong Lo” to “Molo” to “Paterno” families of Sta. Cruz, Manila married into the Yatco family, the Asuncion family name did not really became a common Biñan family name.

    The Asuncion family went to Biñan when Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion married Ignacio Gomes Yatco, son of Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes. As the wife of Ignacio Yatco, she carried the family name “Yatco” and, thus, the Asuncion, as a family name, disappeared.

    Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion is a descendant of Ming Mong Lo/Jose Molo through his daughter, Maria De La Paz Molo, who married Mariano Kagalitan Asuncion. The union bore a son, Antonio Asuncion y Molo, who married Remigia Santa Ana of Santa Cruz, Manila. Spouses’ Antonio and Remigia Asuncion are the parents of Valentina Asuncion Yatco.

    The first known Alzona’s to marry to a Biñan family were Jacinto Alzona (son of Silvino Alzona and Ciriaca Amatorio), who married Teodora Angela Yaptinchay Yatco, daughter of Miguel (Aniceto) Dimas Yatco and Simeona/Simona Trinidad Yaptinchay and Eugenio Alzona, who married Filomena Asuncion Yatco, daughter of Ignacio Gomes Yatco and Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion. Miguel and Ignacio Yatco are brothers.

    A generation later, Jose Alzona, married Marciana Almeda Yatco, a 3rd generation Yatco from the line Ignacio Gomes Yatco. Marciana Almeda Yatco is the daughter of Jose “Coseng” Asuncion Yatco, brother of Filomena married to Eugenio Alzona, and Victoria Custodio Almeda.

    The origin of Silvino Alzona, Eugenio Alzona, and Jose Alzona and/or their relationship to one another have not been identified. Maybe Aicel and/or Alice Alzona, contributors in the Bulan Observer, can provide more information on their grandfather, Jose.

    I agree Cesar Cariño that there are lots of question marks on the family tree of the Yatco’s of Biñan. The most important of which are:

    * Who is the Yatco that first moved to Biñan?
    * How is Marcos Dimas Yatco and Pedro Dimas Yatco related?

    Here are some more questions for clarifications by Cesar Cariño (06/06/11).

    In the files of Nena Yatinchay Zamora,

    · Macario is not among the named children Fermin and Petronila Asuncion Carrillo Trinidad;
    · Maria is not among the children of Pasquala and Lazaro Velasco;
    · Pasquala and Lazaro Velasco had 2 other children, Salome married to Martin Belan and Dolores married to Felipe Amoranto;
    · Leandro, son of Teodora Angela and Jacinto Alzona, married Gaudencia Velarde is identified as Alejandro;
    · Son, Ponciano is identified as Potenciano;
    · Son Nazario married Candida, not Cadida, Gana;
    · There is no son named Jose; and

    * Maria and Pablo Velasco had no son called Eusebio.

    According to Manuel Yatco Villanueva (04/13/11),

    * The wife of Jose “Coseng” Yatco is Victoria Carlos Almeda. If she is the daughter of Lazaro Almeda and Maria Juana Marvillas Custodio, then her middle name should be “Custodio” not “Carlos”?
    * Could the husband of Sixta Almeda Yatco be Estanslao Zarraga Padua or Estanslao Padua Zarraga, instead of having 2 husbands?

    · There is no son named Ceferino; and

    What is the ancestry of Adriana Yatco, the second wife of Jose Yatco Alzona?

    Is Leoncio Yatco married to Ysidora Faustorino Cruz, the son of Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion? If yes, who is Teodora Marcelino?

    What is the ancestry of Timoteo Yatco married to Emilia Salterio? Is he the descendant of Marcos or of Pedro? Don Timoteo Yatco had an inventory of 800 pilon of sugar in 1907 (Noni Agulto 4/13/10).

    According to Manuel Yatco Villanueva (06/05/11),

    * The second wife of Eleuterio Asuncion Yatco is __ Francisco and mother of Emilio Francisco Yatco, who then is Ana Almeda, the mother of Leonila?
    * The wife of Emilio Francisco Yatco is Fernanda Evangelista, how then could Fernanda Evangelista be the third wife of Eleuterio Asuncion Yatco? The children of Emilio and Fernanda Yatco are the same as those named as the children of Eluterio and his third wife Fernanda Evangelista, except a Socorro for Emilio and a Maria for Eluterio.
    * Christopher Yatco (06/07/11) confirms that his ancestry is Eleuterio and Fernanda Yatco, which raises the question of who is the father of Emilio Francisco Yatco?

    Christopher,

    * Would you know why Jose (Lolo Potong) and Mariano (Lolo Nano) Yatco have a letter “S” after their first names? Should it not be letter “C”, as their mother is Ysidora faustino Cruz?
    * Who are the other children of Lolo Potong and Lola Osay Yatco in addition to Tito Nestor and Leony? Aren’t Cesar, Ismael and Oscar, husband of Tita Duday also brothers of Nestor and Leoncio Yatco? I believe that they also have a sister who is still unmarried.
    * As to Isidro Mercado Yatco married to Maximina Gonzales, the only probable connection to the Yatco family would be though Ysidro Yatco, The son of GregorioGomes Yatco, married to Bonifacia Alejandra Mercado-Rizal and brother of the “Tres Marias de Yatco”.

    Cesar, the news that Andres Almeda and Maria Yaptinchay had a daughter named Meruacion Almeda married to Timoteo de Mesa is a revelation. In the family gatherings with my aunties and the children of Lolo Tonio, Lolo Teban, and Lolo Munda, there never was a mention of a de Mesa relative.

    Regards.

    Tony

  133. Yolanda Gallagher said,

    July 4, 2011 at 10:52 pm

    To: Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias

    Jose Livioco Cobarrubias married to Norma – as indicated in your 3/22/2011 entry. I am a Livioco and I am looking for Jose Livioco Cobarrubias – the cousin of my mother (Tito Peping who I used to visit at San Miguel Corp. in Ayala Ave. Yolanda Livioco dela Cruz – Gallagher of NYC.

  134. Cesar Carino said,

    June 19, 2011 at 5:20 am

    CORRECTION AND UPDATES

    To Christopher, this is a correction to my post dated June 10, 2011, on the 2nd paragraphs, it is suppose to be Jose Dimas Yatco, (not Juan) married to Marcela Laurel.

    To Manuel, Looking at Romualdo Yatco on my ancestral file, it shows that he has 7 children. They were Felix, Maria, Pedro, Segundo, Felipe, Maxima, and Andrea. Felix was married to Urbana Castrillo (lelang Bana) the daughter of Hipolito Castrillo and Fabiana Guevara. Felix was married to Juaquina Magcale (lelang Quining), mother of Teodora Yatco married to Ruben Carino.

    GANA – TAN GANA Update:

    On Vanessa J. Tan Gana’s post dated September 12, 2010. She was looking for a link between the descendants of Vicente Tang Gana of the old Binan, and her great grandfather Vicente Tan Gana, married to Sergia Miranda. The Gana link was not with her great grandfather but was with her grandmother, Remedios Arcega wife of Francisco Tan Gana. Remedios Arcega was a descendant of Vicente Tang Gana and Tomasa Apolonia thru their daughter, Petrona Gana.

    These happened by chance recently while helping my brother-in-law search his ancestry, who identified his grandfather as Cirilo Arcega. These are the names found, Petrona Gana, married Eustacio Rubio, their daughter Engracia Rubio married Angel Reyes. Engracia and Angel’s daughter was Silveria Reyes who married Cirilo Arcega, whose daughter Remedios Arcega married Francisco Tan Gana.

  135. June 12, 2011 at 2:05 am

    Hi Cesar,
    yes,you may correct my entry since the only source my Nanay who is already 82 years old..Claudios 3rd wife Epipana “Lelang Pania” their children;Ruben(no sibling) Levi,Elisa and Guilierma..thanks you Cesar, can you post more of your research regarding Yatcos of Binan.

  136. Christopher Yatco said,

    June 11, 2011 at 4:27 am

    Toto, do you have anything about the batistas of binan? They’re considered to be one of the prominent families of binan.

  137. Cesar Carino said,

    June 10, 2011 at 11:07 pm

    Christopher,

    You have mentioned it before and I’ve read more about Mona Lisa (Gloria Yatco) online since then. I have not seen the name of her grandparents, Isidro Mercado Yatco and Maxima Gonzales, but I am keeping an eye on it. It is sometimes impossible and hard to find these links due to the limited available records from Binan, (the earliest was mid 1840’s). I wish the Binan records dated back to the time of Juan Mercado, even during the time of Domingo Lamco (late 1600), we could have figured out and learned more about our ancestry.

    On Juan Dimas Yatco and 2nd wife, Marcela Laurel (Chirstopher Yatco, dated June 8, 2011), their son, Alfredo Leon Yatco married Jacinta Flores, on 1923 in Alaminos, Laguna.

    On Manuel Yatco Villanueva’s (entry dated June 5, 2011 at 5:38 am) I just wanted to correct his comment (if I may) on Teodora Yatco and Ruben Carino who’s parents Claudio Carino and Epipana Mercado was married on May 17, 1927 in Binan, Ruben therefore was a legitimate child and not out of wedlock as indicated. Epipana was Claudio’s 3rd marriage, his 1st wife was Macaria Laochengco, and the 2nd marriage was to Teresa Laochengco to which the eldest son was Aquilino Carino Sr., an educator, Harvard graduate, founder and owner of Grinhar College.

    Thanks.

  138. June 9, 2011 at 10:45 am

    Christopher:

    Yes, I recall that Jo Panlilio occasionally mentioned that the character actress Mona Lisa [ Gloria Yatco in real life ], who usually played angst-ridden, aristocratic roles, was a Yatco relative also from Binan, Laguna.

    Toto Gonzalez

  139. Christopher Yatco said,

    June 9, 2011 at 2:23 am

    Tito Cesar, in your research about the yatco clan ,did you encounter a certain isidro mercado yatco married to maximina gonzales. Isidro was said to be a first cousin of jose rizal and spent time in paris performing as a violinist. His wife maximina was a soprano singer.their grand daughter gloria lerma yatco or mona lisa appeared in such films like insiang.

  140. Cesar Carino said,

    June 8, 2011 at 2:43 pm

    Tony,

    Referring to your post dated May 5, 2011, here are some informations on the Andres Almeda’s family that I have.

    Andres Almeda and Maria Yaptinchay was married on1884 in Binan. Andres was the son of Antonio Almeda and Maria Dolores Ponce. On my file I have 6 children instead of 5 for Andres and Maria. After the 4th child Esteban Almeda, the 5th was Meruacion Almeda born around 1895, she was married to Timoteo de Mesa , son of Mariano de Mesa and Eugenia Almazan. Raymunda was the 6th child born around 1898.

    Thanks.

  141. Christopher Yatco said,

    June 8, 2011 at 1:06 am

    Hi , Jose dimas yatco ,son of marcos married twice . his second wife was marcela laurel vda de tapia of tanauan batangas establishing the link of the yatcos of binan to the famous international orchestra conductor oscar yatco of tanauan batangas.

  142. Christopher Yatco said,

    June 7, 2011 at 6:33 pm

    Hi Tony , Nestor Yatco married to tomasa gana is the son of jose faustino cruz yatco and generosa cruz gana. One of his brothers was dr leony yatco. The yatcos are originally from san miguel manila and resided on aguado street near malacanang. Their forte was in the arts and music. our clan’s progenitor arrived in the philippines from macau and established a business in building carriages for the spanish governor generals and sculpting altars for chruches. as for my line , I’m a descendant of enacio (ignacio) yatco and valentina asuncion. my great grandfather was eleuterio yatco who married thrice. My lolo was francisco yatco(eleuterio’s son with fernanda evangelista his third wife) married to asuncion belizario. I really don’t know how some of the yatcos ended up in binan. Maybe it was Marcos Dimas Yatco who first migrated to binan because most of his descendants for some time lived in binan and some are still residing in binan.

  143. Cesar Carino said,

    June 6, 2011 at 12:52 pm

    Tony,

    Yes, there are lots of question marks on the family tree of theYatco’s of Binan. The Almeda’s, Alzona’s, and many other families also have the same problem. As I looked thru the Binan church records, some information I found is different from some of what the Yatco family are talking about. A good example is the name Aniceto Yatco in Tito Leony’s research, Aniceto is maybe a real individual in the old Yatco clan, but he was wrongly identified as the husband of Pablo Yap Tin Chay’s daughter Simona and I am yet to see his name and his decendants in the available church records.

    I am sharing here the names that I have on the Yatco family; some of it is from information found online, from Binan church records, and from friends. Hope this could help those who are interested and is honestly searching the Yatco Family ancestry.

    The oldest Yatco name I found is Marcos Dimas Yatco, married to Maria Juana Gomes. Their children, identified on the church records were: Miguel married Simona Yaptinchay (1847), Silvina married Marcelo de la Paz (1858), Manuel married Vicenta Reyes(1883), and Jose married Hilaria de Castro (1884). What is not known is, whether Ygnacio Yatco, and Gregorio Yatco, were also their sons? We may assume that they are. I have seen Ygnacio’s name in the church records but not Gregorio’s.

    Miguel Dimas Yatco married Simona Yaptinchay (1847) daughter of Pablo Yaptinchay and Maria Carrillo Trinidad (the record indicated that Pablo was already deceased when the event took place). Miguel and Simona’s children were; Petrona; Fermin married Petronila Asuncion Carrillo Trinidad (1883), children were: Mariano, Macario, Catalina, Gertrudes, Feliza, Jose, Basilia, and Belen; Pasquala married Lazaro Velasco (1889), children were: Monica, Ygnacio, and Maria; Teodora Angela married Jacinto Alzona (son of Silvino Alzona and Ciriaca Amatorio) , children were: Leandro married Gaudencia Velarde (my wife’s maternal grandparents), Urbana married Ramon Carino, Ponciano, Ciriaco married Rafaela Yatco, Nazario married Cadida Gana (daughter of Jesualdo and Crisanta F. Cruz), and Jose; Maria married Pablo Velasco, children were: Ygnacio, and Eusebio. Lazaro and Pablo Velasco were brothers; they are the sons of Vicente Velasco and Juana Castrillo.

    Gregorio Yatco’s wife is unknown, his son Ysidro Yatco (source Chris Yatco), married Bonifacia Yatco (daughter of Juan Mercado and Cirila Alejandra). Ygnacio Yatco married Valentina Sta. Ana Assuncion, the children were Emeterio, Jose, Leoncio, and Filomena.

    -Emeterio Yatco (or Elueterio as they call him) was married 3 times, 1st wife, Maria Carrillo, one child: Felicidad (source Chris Yatco); 2nd wife, Ana Almeda (daughter of Jose Almeda and Bernabela Rubio), one child: Leonila; 3rd wife, Fernanda Evangelista, children: Domingo, Roque, Maria, Primo, Brigida, Asucion, and Francisco.

    -Jose Yatco married Victoria Almeda (daughter of Lazaro Almeda and Maria Juana Marvillas Custodio), children were; Maria married Juan de dios Geronimo (1892), Sixta married Estanslao Zarraga in 1896 (if Sixta married also to Estanslao Padua of Pila, he must the be 2nd husband, I do not know) , Ceferino baptized 1882, Rafaela married Ciriaco Alzona (son of Jacinto Alzona and Angela Yatco), Bernardo married Adriana Amoranto (daughter of Maximo Amoranto and Isabel Gana), Felicidad, Salud, Ignacio married Isidra Guico (daughter of Florentino Guico and Miguela Carrillo); Marciana married Jose Alzona.

    -Leoncio Yatco married Ysidora Faustorino Cruz, children were: Lutgarda, Isabel, Yrineo, Francisco married Josefa Gonzales (1931), Jose Yatco married Generosa Gana, 1916,(daughter of Jesualdo Gana and Crisanta Faustorino Cruz), Mariano S. Yatco married Raymunda Almeda 1915 (daughter of Andres Almeda and Maria Yaptinchay), and Lucas Yatco.

    -Filomena Yatco married Eugenio Alzona, children were Jose Alzona married twice, 1st wife Adriana Punzalan, 2nd wife Adriana Yatco (resided in Calamba); Agrifino Alzona; Cayo Alzona, married Emilia Amoranto (daughter of Maximo Amoranto and Isabel Gana).

    Romualdo Yatco was the son of Pedro Dimas Yatco and Eusebia Belan (married 1852), Pedro’s 1st wife was Dominga de Guzman. I do not know his relationship to Marcos Dimas Yatco, maybe his brother or he maybe his son and brother to Miguel. Eusebia Belan was the daughter of Telesforo Belan and Maria Neri. Romualdo Yatco married Juliana Depante. Mostly their decendants lived in San Antonio.

    As to Timoteo Yatco, his wife was Emilia Salterio, their daughter Josefina was married to Isidro Yaptinchay, son of Pablo Yaptinchay and Leonila M. Yatco. Maybe he was the one mentioned on the Paterno phamplet posted by Noni.

  144. June 5, 2011 at 6:48 am

    sir,
    as for the question of Eleuterio Asuncion Yatco first married Maria Carillo and the only dauther Sor Felicidad C.Yatco,second married to a _Francisco and only son Emilio F.Yatco married to Fernanda Evangelista(Funeraria Tala and the sister of my lelang isya Basilia Evangelista_m Mariano Villanueva my Lolo Nano), the children of Emilio & Fernanda, Domingo_m Maria San Luis,Primo_m Baldomera Reyes,Brigida_m Gavino Carino,Roque_m Margarita,Asuncion_Teodora Tanalega,Socorro_ ?..Francisco_m Asuncion Belizario the line of Christofer Yatco and Cokie Yatco

  145. June 5, 2011 at 5:38 am

    Hi po,
    as to the question of Romualdo Yatco..the ff. children,I. Felix Yatco_m Urbana Castrillo & children are German_m Purification yatco alzona,Alicia_m Cesar Yatco Alzona,Remedios_m Arch.Faustino Ramos(parents of Arch.Jorge Y.Ramos/Wishwood devt.corp) and Jacinto_m Azon Silgera..II.Maria_m to a Miranda of Bulacan & children are Tia Flora and Tia Isyang..III. Segundo_m to ??
    and children are Tolentino,Luz,Zenaida..IV Felipe_m Lelang Quining & children are Luciano (lolo Siano),Fely (lolo Fely) the father of Arch.Alexander Yatco (former U.S.Navy),Teodora_m Ruben Carino (son of Claudio Carino out of wed lock),Jesusita (lelang sitang),Maximina_m to a Almalel.

  146. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    June 4, 2011 at 10:00 am

    Hi Toto,

    It is intriguing that there is very little know about the Yatco family tree, considering that “The Yatco are one of Binan’s oldest fortunes.”. Secondly, if the Yatco’s are from Manila, as claimed by Tito Cesar Yatco (Christopher Yatco 10/25/10), who was the first Yatco to marry into a Biñan family?

    Thanks to Nena Yatinchay Zamora, the family of Aniceto Yatco married to Simeona Trinidad Yaptinchay is documented. However, the other Yatco lines are vague.

    Attached are some findings, conclusions, and questions I have regarding the other Yatco lines as gleamed from the main section and the comments submitted as of 10 May 2011. I hope that Lito Hocson, who has a copy of Tito Leony Yatco’s genelogical chart, Manuel Yatco Villanueva, who has a listing of the Jose Yatco-Victoria Almeda family, and Christopher Yatco could clarify some of the issues raised.

    Maybe, Manuel Yatco Villanueva can also expand the family information of Victoria Carlos Almeda, the wife of Jose “Coseng” Yatco y Asuncion. The information, hopefully, could lead to the ancestry of Andres Almeda married to Maria (Kapitang Maria) Gana Yaptinchay.

    Regards.

    Tony

    *************************************************

    In the main section of The Families of Old Biñan, the Yatco’s of Biñan was to have originated with Ysidro Yatco. Christopher Yatco (10/14/10) said that the father of Ysidro is Gregorio Yatco, who had 4 brothers, Ignacio Yatco, married to Valentina Asuncion, Aniceto Yatco, and married to Simeona Yaptinchay, Jose Yatco, and Manuel Yatco.

    If Ignacio Yatco is the brother of Gregorio Yatco (Christopher Yatco 10/14/10) and is the father of Jose “Coseng” Yatco y Asuncion, married to Victoria Carlos Almeda (Manuel Yatco Villanueva 4/13/11), therefore Coseng Yatco and Ysidro Yatco are first cousins. The children of Aniceto/Miguel Dimas (Gomes?) Yatco (Cesar Cariño 11/12/10) and Simeona/Simona Trinidad Yaptinchay are also their first cousins.

    If Marcos Dimas Yatco, married to Maria Juana Gomes, is the father of Aniceto/Miguel Yatco (Cesar Cariño 11/12/10), then they should also be the parents of Gregorio, Ignacio, Jose, and Manuel Yatco (Christopher Yatco 10/14/10).

    If Eleuterio Yatco, the son of Ignacio Yatco married to Valentina Asuncion is the grandfather of Christopher Yatco (9/25/10), who is the grandmother?

    Jose “Coseng” Yatco and Romualdo Yatco could not be contemporaries, if Romualdo’s son, German married Purificacion Y. Alzona, and daughter, Alicia married Cesar Y. Alzona, children of Marciana Almeda Yatco and married to Jose Alzona. Purificacion and Cesar Y. Alzona are grandchildren of Coseng Yatco.

    What is the ancestry of Romualdo Yatco (Manuel Yatco Villanueva 4/13/11)? Could Romualdo be from the line of one of the 2 other sons, Jose or Manuel of Marcos Dimas Yatco, married to Maria Juana Gomes? He is not in the family tree of Aniceto/Miguel and Simeona/Simona Yatco.

    Who is Jose Alzona? Is he the son of Eugenio Alzona and Filomena Yatco and brother of Cayo Alzona (Sonny Reyes 6/11/10)? The Alzona line gets confusing since, on 11 June 2010 Sonny Reyes identified Encarnacion, Luz, Ceasar, Augusto and Octavio as children of Cayo Alzona, confirming the listin in the main section. However, on 12 June 2010, Sonny Reyes referred to them as Cayo’s siblings.

    Who is Jacinto Alzona married to Teodora Angela Yaptinchay Yatco? The off-springs of Jacinto and Teodora Alzona are found in the Aniceto Yatco – Simeona Trinidad Yaptinchay genealogy.

    Who is Nestor Yatco married to Tomasa Toribio Gana?

    Who are the parents of Mariano S. Yatco, married to Raymunda Yaptinchay Almeda and, Jose S. Yatco, married to Generosa (Lola Osay) Gana (Antonio Cuyegkeng 5/5/11)?

    Who is Don Leoncio Yatco (alcalde, kapitan or gobernadorcillo) from 1890-91 (Noni Agulto 4/13/10)? Is he Leoncio Asuncion Yatco married to Teodora Marcelino?

    Who is Don Jose Yatco with a 1907 rice inventory and Don Timoteo Yatco who had a 1907 sugar inventory (Noni Agulto 4/13/10)?

    As far as I could determine from the contributions to the web site, the Yatco family tree is as follows:

    Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes had 4 children, Gregorio, Ignacio married to Valentina Santa Ana Asuncion, Aniceto/Miguel Dimas (Gomes?) married to Simeona/Simona Trinidad Yaptinchay, Jose, and Manuel Yatco.

    Gregorio had a child called Ysidro, who married Bonifacia Alejandra Mercado-Rizal. The union bore 3 daughters, the “Tres Marias de Yatco”, Maria Salud married to Pablo Perlas, Maria Paz married to Edilberto Arevalo Ocampo, and Maria Leonila married to Pablo Gana Yaptinchay.

    Ignacio and Valentina Yatco also had 4 children, Eluterio, Jose married to Victoria Carlos Almeda, Leoncio married to Teodora Marcelino, and Filomena married to Eugenio Alzona.
    Jose “Coeng” and Victoria Yatco had 8 children, Maria married Juan Geronimo, Ignacio married Isidra Carrillo Guico, Felicidad, Salud, Marciana married Jose Alzona, Bernardo married “Lelang Bulag” Amoranto, Sixta married Estanislao Padua, and Rafaela married to Ciriaco Alzona.
    Two of the children of Jose Alzona and Marciana Almeda Yatco were Purification married to German C. Yatco and Cesar married Alicia C. Yatco, children of Romualdo Yatco..
    The other children of was Romualdo Yatco were Felix married Urbana Castrillo, Remedios married Faustino “Lolo Ote” Barrera Ramos, and Jacinto married Azon Silgera.
    Aniceto/Miguel Dimas (Gomes) and Simeona/Simona Trinidad Yaptinchay had 4 children. The eldest Petrona married a Rotea; the only son, Fermin married Petronila Asuncion Carillo-Trinidad; Pascaula (Pasquala) married Lazaro Velasco; Teodora Angela married Juanito Alzona; and, the youngest, maria married Pablo Velasco.

  147. Cesar Carino said,

    June 3, 2011 at 2:58 pm

    Toto,

    According to historians Jose Rizal’s Mercado ancestry, like the most prominent families of old Binan, was traced back to China. It will be hard to establish the link on Mr. Monico Mercado’s claim. Yes, DNA testing would be the best bet. Im posting here what Dr. Eusebio Koh wrote (this is available online):

    The Chinese Ancestry of Jose Rizal

    (by: Dr. Eusebio L. Koh is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at the University of Regina and at a time was Head of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Regina.)

    In my recent book “Like the Mimosa”, I included my column on our national hero Dr. Jose Rizal, which I wrote eight years ago. The column is titled “ Jose Rizal – a Man of Ironies” and can be found on p. 151 of that book. My main theme was that despite his small physical stature, his mind, his aspirations, his accomplishments and his patriotism are all of gigantic measure.

    I also mentioned that his father, Francisco Mercado was a Chinese mestizo. So today I would like to elaborate on this. History books have hinted at this aspect of Rizal’s make-up but only recently have we seen more details.

    In June of 2004, Austin Craig published his e-book “Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal, Philippine Patriot” and gave a long-winded account of Rizal’s Chinese Ancestry (Chapters 2 and 3). Craig was an Assistant Professor of Oriental History at the University of the Philippines and he did the research through the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation.

    Craig started the lineage from Lam-co, a Chinese immigrant from the Chinchew district in the Fokien Province in China. Chinchew was where the Jesuits and later the Dominicans had their missions and Lam-co was perhaps aware of Christianity before coming to the Catholic Philippines. It was a literary center with half a million candid and friendly people especially to foreigners. The district now is better known for the port of Amoy.

    Lam-co was above ordinary standing as evidenced by his leadership among those who settled with him in Binan. He was baptized in the Parian (Chinese Catholic) church of San Gabriel on a Sunday in June of 1697 at the age of thirty-five and he took the name of Domingo in honor of the day. Thirty some years later he married Inez de la Rosa, an educated daughter of a Chinchew family in the same church in Biñan. Inez was half his age. Among their offsprings was a son Francisco Mercado, named after a family friend Friar Francisco Marquez and Mercado to denote a merchant, thus saving the son from prejudice against Chinese surnames yet retaining a link to the Chinese merchant. This name would appear later in the lineage.

    Francisco Mercado turned out to be a well-to-do rancher with a large herd of carabaos. On May 26, 1771, he married Bernarda Monicha, a Chinese mestiza from San Pedro. In 1783 he was the alcalde (chief officer) of Binan. Their eldest son Juan married Cirila Alejandra, daughter of Domingo Lam-co’s, Chinese godson, Siong-co. Juan Mercado followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming alcalde of Binan in 1808, 1813 and 1823.
    Gobernadorcillo Mercado (or Capitan Juan as he was called) and Cirila had a huge family. Among the younger sons was Francisco Rizal Mercado who turned out to be Jose Rizal’s father. Francisco was only eight years old when his father Juan died, but his mother and older sister Potenciana took care of him. After their mother passed away, Potenciana and Francisco moved to nearby Calamba.

    A year after Potenciana died in 1847, Francisco Mercado married Teodora Alonzo who resided in Calamba with her mother although a native of Manila. The lineage of Teodora Alonzo is harder to traced, although her father, Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo (1790-1854) is said to look very much like a Chinese.

    Three generations of Alonzos were municipal captains of Biñan and at various times head of the mestizos’ organization of the Santa Cruz district in Manila. The name of Alonzo was also changed to Realonda in 1850 with an allusion to royal blood or possibly a mistake in writing.

    Jose Protasio Rizal Mercado y Alonzo Realonda was born in Kalamba, Laguna on June 19, 1861 to Francisco Engracio Rizal Mercado y Alejandro and his wife Teodora Morales Alonzo Realonda y Quintos. He was the seventh child. Like most Filipinos, Rizal’s ethnicity comes from many streams, not the least of which is the Chinese ancestry even though attempts are often made to hide this through a name change.

    Rizal was baptized when he was three days old by a Filipino priest, Fr. Rufino Collantes. A translation of his birth and baptism reads as follows: “I, the undersigned parish priest of the town of Calamba, certify that from the investigation made with proper authority, for replacing the parish books which were burned September 28, 1862, to be found in Docket No. 1 of Baptisms, page 49, it appears by the sworn testimony of competent witness that JOSE RIZAL MERCADO is the legitimate son, and lawful wedlock, of Don Francisco Rizal Mercado and Dona Teodora Realonda, having been baptized in this parish on the 22nd day of June in the year 1861, by the parish priest, Rev. Rufino Collantes, Rev. Pedro Casanas being his godfather.”—Witness my signature. (signed) LEONCIO LOPEZ.

  148. May 30, 2011 at 2:45 pm

    Gem:

    Hi there!!! Your comment is still there in the Comments section of the “About Toto Gonzalez2″ page…

    No, I haven’t found that notebook yet. I haven’t really been looking for it. I’m so “bizzy”…

    OK, about the Mercados… It has not been verified, but it is the oral tradition in the Mercado de Sasmuan clan that there were 7 Mercado brothers from Apalit, Pampanga [ of all places! ] in the 1600s-1700s who fanned out all over the province and beyond, and spawned the various Mercado clans, the most notable of which was the one of Sasmuan town. One of the brothers was supposed to have settled in Binan, Laguna.

    However, according to Monico Mercado [ the famous Capampangan political figure from the turn of the 20th century ], the Mercado ancestor of Francisco Engracio Mercado, the father of Dr. Jose Rizal, was from Sasmuan, Pampanga and a member of the clan. In fact, Monico Mercado claimed that Dr. Jose Rizal was his cousin on his paternal side.

    The only way to prove that information now is through DNA testing.

    Toto Gonzalez

  149. Gem Mercado said,

    May 30, 2011 at 9:10 am

    Hi Toto! I can’t find the thread where I placed a comment before…I was the one who asked about Tiburcio Mercado of Apalit, Pampanga (Mayor 1908-1912, married to Esperanza Ceballos, parents of Lourdes Ceballos Mercado-Kho, Luz Ceballos Mercado-Espino, et. al.; Luz is the mother of Belen Mercado Espino-Silverio, mother of Catherine “Kitkat” Silverio-Zobel)…have you found your notebook yet?

    Also, any connection between the Mercados of Apalit, Pampanga with the Mercados (Rizal) of Laguna? Thanks!

  150. lucy francisco borromeo said,

    May 19, 2011 at 2:16 pm

    Tony gana is the son of eduardo gana and nena potenciano, grandchild of vicente gana and betty chuidian.

    For those who want to come to the services of ANTONIO P. GANA,….address and schedule are as follows:

    Fairhaven Memorial (www.fairhavenmemorial.com)
    1702 Fairhaven Ave,
    Sta. Ana, CA, USA

    Friday May 20, 2011
    4pm to 8pm viewing
    at Mortuary Chapel

    Saturday May 21, 2011
    11am to 3pm viewing
    at Pavillon

    Saturday May 21, 2011
    3pm to 4pm funeral service
    at Pavillon

    In Santuario de San Antonio Funeral Chapels
    McKinley Rd, Forbes, Makati City
    Philippines

    Saturday June 4, 2011
    Sunday June 5, 2011

    Inurnment Mass at Santuario De San Antonio Church
    McKinley Road, Forbes, Makati City
    time to be announced later.

  151. Enrique Bustos said,

    May 10, 2011 at 2:18 pm

    Tony Gana is a very good friend of Former President Joseph Estrada he was appointed General Manger of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport during short regime of President Estrada his first wife is Thelma Gana

  152. Enrique Bustos said,

    May 10, 2011 at 1:26 pm

    Mom Charged With Killing Husband, Shooting Son On Mother’s Day
    CBS
    May 9, 2011

    SANTA ANA (CBS) — A Tustin woman was arrested on suspicion of killing her husband and wounding her son on Mother’s Day, an Orange County sheriff’s spokesman said Monday.

    Annamaria Gana was booked on suspicion of murder and attempted murder in the Sunday afternoon shooting death of her husband, 73-year-old Tony Gana, and the wounding of her 16-year-old son in an unincorporated neighborhood of north Tustin, sheriff’s spokesman Jim Amormino said.

    When deputies arrived after the 4:25 p.m. shooting at 18422 Manning Drive, the woman’s 9-year-old son was holding what investigators suspect was the murder weapon — “a high-powered handgun,” Amormino said.

    The 16-year-old boy was in fair condition today, recovering from bullet wounds in his shoulder area, Amormino said.

    Tony Gana suffered a gunshot wound to the chest, Amormino said.

    Investigators declined to reveal the suspected motive for the shooting, he said

  153. May 5, 2011 at 5:34 pm

    To our dear Binan friends,

    Thank you very much for your impressive inputs about old and contemporary Binan, Laguna. The Comments section alone of this blog post has become a fantastic database. 200 comments and counting!!!

    I can never thank all of you enough for your generosity, kindness, and esprit de corps. To extend help to a well-meaning researcher like me is commendable. If only the knowledgeable people of all old Philippine towns were as cooperative as you in this blog, we would already have a truly formidable database of old Filipino families.

    Please keep the comments coming!!!

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez :D :D :D

  154. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    May 5, 2011 at 5:21 pm

    Hi Toto,

    Belated Happy Easter.

    Hope you had a wonderful and adventurous Easter weekend.

    Attached is the family tree of Alberto Almeda and Maria Gana Yaptinchay and their families. Kapitang Maria, as she was commonly known, is the younger sister of Guido and older sister Pablo Yaptinchay.

    Gilbert N. Almeda (March 15, 2011) is the son of Alberto Medel Almeda married to Corazon Nava. Tito Berting is the 2nd child and eldest son of Antonio Yaptinchay Almeda married to Ricarda Sta. Ana Medel, and not one of their siblings.

    As to the question of the roots of Andres Almeda, I am talking with Tita Freddie Almeda Consunji and hoping that her family tree could shed some light on the ancestry of Andres Almeda. Tita Freddie, who claims to be the Almeda from Bicol, is the daughter of Dominador Almeda, who moved to Naga City, Camarines Sur in 1924. Dominador is the son Potenciano Almeda of Biñan.

    My mother always refers to Tita Freddie as her cousin, so did Tita Osang (Generosa Almeda) Latorre, daughter of Esteban and Lazara Yaptinchay Almeda. However, my mother never explained the relationship. The former NBI Director Mariano Almeda of Biñan, also claimed that Dominador Almeda is a relative.

    Maybe in the Yatco-Almeda family tree that is with Manuel Yatco Villanueva could also provide a clue on both Andres Almeda and Potenciano Almeda.

    Regards and take care.

    Tony

    ************************************************

    Alberto Yaptinchay y Carillo-Trinidad and Macaria Gana had 8 children, 3 boys and 5 girls.

    The 1998 Yaptinchay tree of Nena Yatinchay Zamora, did not say much about the 3 of the children. The listing simply showed that Julia, the eldest, married Cirilo Carlos, Andres, the second child, married Teodora Zavalla and the 5th child, Raymunda, married Ramon Ocampo.

    Daughters Bibiana, the 6th child, and Josefa, the 7th, never got married, while the youngest child and son, Pablo, married Leonila Yatco y Mercado-Rizal. (Antonio Cuyegkeng 4/4/11)

    The 2nd son, Guido married Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto (Antonio Cuyegkeng 3/03/11).

    The marriage of Maria (Kapitang Maria) G. Yaptinchay, the 4th child, to Andres Almeda gave birth to 5 children. Other than the eldest child, Rosenda marrying Macario Carrillo, the file showed no other information on Rosenda’s family. The second child Encarnacion married Francisco Concepcion Casas (Main Blog). The eldest son, Antonio married Ricarda Sta. Ana Medel, Esteban married Lazara Sabas, and Raymunda married Mariano S. Yatco.

    Antonio and Ricarda Yaptinchay Almeda had 4 children, Julita married to Rogelio Karamihan, Alberto married to Corazon Nava, Justa married Cesar Leviste from Batangas, and Andres married Socorro Francisco. Alberto, the father of Gilbert N. Almeda (3/11/11) is the second child and eldest son of Antonio and Ricarda Almeda.

    Esteban and Lazara Yaptinchay Almeda had 5 children, Lolita married to Isabelo Tapia (Noni Agulto 2/16/10; Antonio Cuyegkeng 1/13/11), Encarnacion married to Antonio Gomez, Generosa married Porfirio La Torre, Cesar married to Caridad Vergel de Dios, and Natividad married Francisco Tankiang.

    Raymunda (Lola Munda) Yaptinchay Almeda and Mariano (Lolo Nano) S. Yatco, also, had 7 children, Isidora, the paediatrician, married to Alberto Zalamea; Herminia (Tita Mining), the mother of the late Sandigan Bayan Chief Justice Norberto Y. Geraldez, married to Judge Ambrosio Geraldez; Imelda married Ambassador Privado (Tito Ibing) Garcia Jimenez; Jose married to Josefina Cabreza; Ismael married Iluminada Menpin; Ester married Primitivo Garcia, Jr.; and Ramon married Yolanda Batista.

    Ambassador Privado (Tito Ibing) Garcia Jimenez was the Philippine Ambassador to Canada from 1971 to 1978. His last posting was in Singapore from 1979 to 1985.

    Lolo Nano Yatco was the brother of Jose (Lolo Potong) S. Yatco, married to Generosa (Lola Osay) Gana, the parents of Leony (Dr. Leoncio) G. Yatco (Noni Agulto 02/26/10; Rafael G. Hocson 09/05/10) married to Letty L. Yaptinchay, daughter of Agapito Alberto Yaptinchay married to Avelina (Belen) Luna from Malabon. Tita Letty had 2 brothers, Tito Angel married to Rafaela (Tita Feling) Gana and Tito Oscar is married to Leonor Bedia (Antonio Cuyegkeng 3/10/11).

    The 2 ancestral Yatco houses, built facing each other and sharing a common driveway, were located on Paterno Street, now called Gen. Capinpin St., directly opposite Ligaya Theater. The driveway is aligned with the small street of the plaza fronting the Aling Ruth Store (Sal Gonzalez 8/21/10) of Ruth Zarate. On the left side of Aling Ruth was a barbershop and on the other side was Biñan Hardware of the Almazan’s.

  155. noni agulto said,

    April 29, 2011 at 3:55 am

    Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal; Philippine Patriot, by Austin Craig

    “A year after his sister Potenciana’s death, Francisco Mercado married Teodora Alonzo, a native of Manila, who for several years had been residing with her mother at Kalamba. The history of the family of Mrs. Mercado is unfortunately not so easily traced as is that of her husband, and what is known is of less simplicity and perhaps of more interest since the mother’s influence is greater than the father’s, and she was the mother of José Rizal.

    Her father, Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo (born 1790, died 1854), is said to have been “very Chinese” in appearance. He had a brother who was a priest, and a sister,”ISABEL”, who was quite wealthy; he himself was also well to do. Their mother, Maria Florentina (born 1771, died 1817), was, on her mother’s side, of the famous Florentina family of Chinese mestizos originating in Baliwag, Bulacan, and her father was Captain Mariano Alejandro of Biñan.

    Lorenzo Alberto was municipal captain of Biñan in 1824, as had been his father, Captain Cipriano Alonzo (died 1805), in 1797. The grandfather, Captain Gregorio Alonzo (died 1794), was a native of Quiotan barrio, and twice, in 1763 and again in 1768, at the head of the mestizos’ organization of the Santa Cruz district in Manila.”

    *******

    The sister of Don Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo mentioned in the article – Isabel is the same person mentioned in the book “Power+ Faith+ Image”: 16th-19th Century Philippine Art in Ivory:” – Doña Isabel Alberto de Sanchez who might possibly be the mother of Doña Agustina Alberto-Sanchez de Carabaca de Yaptinchay, wife of Don Guido Yaptinchay, however the Carabaca surname seemed to be lost somewhere down the line….

  156. April 13, 2011 at 6:09 am

    Hi Cris
    regarding Arch.Jorge Y.Ramos is not in line directly to Asuncion Clan rather to the Castrillo family of Sta. Ana Manila the fame Sculptures of Edsa and GMA etc.and Paternal Yatco of Binan was Romualdo Yatco, their children was Felix Yatco married Urbana Castrillo of San Antonio Binan the sibling German Yatco married Purification Alzona y Yatco(my grand father & grand mother)Alicia C. Yatco married Cesar Alzona y Yatco[Purification and Cesar are Asuncion decendant] Remedios C. Yatco married Arch. Faustino “Lolo Ote” Barrera Ramos of Tarlac, Tarlac & the grand father and mother of Prof. Nick P. Ramos of UST and WishWood Devt. Corp.Arch. Jacinto C. Yatco married Azon Silgera and still leaving ancestral house San Antonio Binan.
    thank you

    manning

  157. April 13, 2011 at 5:32 am

    Hi Toto,
    Its been so long to respond for Jan 2 2011 #36
    The Ignacio Yatco mention on this post was the eldest son of Jose “Coseng” Yatco
    y Asuncion and Victoria Carlos Almeda and was married to Isidra Guico..The children of Jose & Victoria; Rafaela the youngest married Ciriaco Alzona,Sixta married Estanislao Padua of Pila,Laguna(the great grand parents of Atty.Antonio Relova former Laguna Adminstrator) Felicidad Yatco single mother to a Baylon of Cabuyao,Salud Yatco single mother to a Carillo of Binan,Maria the eldest married Juan Geronimo,Marciana(my great grand mother) married Jose Alzona and Bernardo married “Lelang Bulag” Amoranto Thank you

  158. April 10, 2011 at 4:22 am

    two corrections if you do not mind. the dances were held at Dona Aurora as tony cuyegkeng says, not at Grinhar. Choy Vasquez was the son and namesake of Conrado Vasquez Sr, who was the first ombudsman. the may 15 dance rivaled the pampanga and nueva ecija festivities.

  159. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    April 9, 2011 at 4:22 pm

    Hi Toto,

    In the attached article on the Biñan’s social activites, “Greenhar” was the name my older sister and I remember as the place where the dances were held. However, my younger Mercado and Manabat cousins say that Greenhar is in Barrio San Antonio and never in the poblacion. I used to walk from our ancestral home to the dance though the eskenita that run along the Cobeng house.

    Secondly, according to Charie Mercado not all the men mentioned are in the list of members of the Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity. However, these were the then young men that I hanged with during the dances as a chaperone to my sister and they taught me how to drink whisky (Antonio Cuyegkeng 3/11/11).

    Regards.

    Tony

    ******************************************************************************

    After the war, there were 3 social events that brought the Biñanenses home from all over: the May 15 San Isidro Labrador fiesta dance, the “Ika Siyam” Los Maduros Ball on May 23 and the Flores the Mayo on May 31. The members of the old Biñan families living in Manila made it a point to attend and participate.

    The May 15 “Biñaneses” ball was hosted by the Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity to honor the members of the year’s college graduating class. The balls were held at the “Greenhar” (Dona Aurora Elementary School) quadrangle on what is now Dr. Antonio Gonzales Street. The main event of the ball was the crowing of the town sweetheart and the Rigodon de Honor. The rigodon consisted of as many as 48 couples, with 12 married couples occupying each cabesera, and 12 single ladies with their escorts each costado, the either sides of the cabeseras. The ladies were in long ternos and the men in jusi or piña barong.

    The music was provided by Philippine big bands like the orchestras of Serafin Payawal and Tirso/Carding Cruz.

    Among the Alphans of the late 50’ and early 60’s were Lito Lim-aco, who later became a mayor of Biñan, Vic Hocson, the older brother of Rafael (Lito) Hocson (Antonio Cuyegkeng 3/11/11), Jorge Garcia, the noted heart surgeon, Choy Vasques, who became an Associate Justice of the Court of Appeals and the first Ombudsman of the country, Dante Amador, and Joevic (?) Gonzales, son of Dr. Antonio (Tonying) Gonzales of UST (Sal Gonzalez 8/21/10),

    In later years, the Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity somehow faded away, and the fiesta dance was, for awhile, taken over by the Frigailers.

    The “Ika Siyam” or “Fiestang Intsik” – “Pistang Intsik” (Noni Agulto 2/16/10) on May 23 was the celebration of the town fiesta by Biñan’s Chinese community. Masses in honor of San Isidro Labrador were celebrated, as well as, a religious procession. The festivities were culminated by a fireworks display at the town plaza (Sal Gonzales 8/21/10).

    While “Biñaneses” ball focused on the younger generation, the Los Maduros ball held after the procession and dinner, of May 23 was a very formal affair hosted by the Los Maduros Club for the older generation of Biñan. The Los Maduros fraternity consisted of the elders of the Biñan families. The ball was, also, held at the “Greenhar” (Dona Aurora Elementary School) quadrangle with Philippine Big band music.

    When it is raining the “Biñaneses” and the Los Maduros balls were held in the Ligaya Theater owned by Zoilo and Pilar Alberto and located at the town plaza.

    It must be one of those rainy May days when the dance was held at the Ligaya Theater that Ms. Presy Guevara (3/22/10) remembers.

    From days before the 15th to the eve of the 23th of May, the town plaza was a carnival site with rides like the ferries wheel, caterpillar, and the merry-go-round. There were also games of chance like throwing a ring on the neck of soft drink bottles and choosing which of the spinning houses will the guinea pig enter. For the more serious bettors, there were the “beto-beto” and “sa pula sa puti” stalls.

    The last event of the month was the Flores de Mayo, a favourite of the spinsters of the Biñan clans, as it gave them the opportunity to play match makers. Weeks before the Flores, they would already be talking with one another, and with their sisters and sisters-in-law, matching/pairing their pre-teen and teenage relatives, who often live in different parts of Metro Manila. Frequently, the men will arrive at the church patio not knowing who/which Reyna/Sagala they will be escorting in the procession. The Flores de Mayo procession starts at the Church patio, then follows the religious processions route around town and ends inside the church for the floral offerings to Mother Mary.

    Other major Biñan “social” events of the time, though more somber, were the Lenten Holy Wednesday and Good Friday processions. Biñanenses from Metro Manila would come home, bringing friends and associates, to participate in and/or watch the procession from the balconies of their ancestral homes. The procession consisted of family heirloom life-size saints on antique carosas. Each family prepared and decorated their own carosas to carry the image of the family owned saint in the procession. Dinner fiestas were served after each procession.

    The focal points of the Holy Wednesday procession were the “Tercera Caida” of the Potenciano family (Michael Potenciano Almendral 7/26/10; Enrique Bustos 2/24/10) and the Mater Dolorosa figure clad in all black with silver trimmings of the Perlas family (Presy Guevara 03/22/10). For the Good Friday procession, it was the Santo Entiero of the Gana family, a silver and glass coffin of the dead Christ.

    These processions are still held on the said dates in Biñan, but no longer in the grand fashion of old. The carosas and figures are there. However, with the disappearance of ancestral homes, the wider geographical dispersal of the extended family members, and current approach of the younger generation towards the Holy Week break, the procession attendance is no longer a major social happening for the old families.

    Lent culminates with the Easter Salubong, held at around 4:30 A.M., main figure is the Yaptinchay image of the Resurrected Christ, which was left in the care of Lola Oneng Almeda Casas. The figure is still in the Casas ancestral house.

  160. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    April 4, 2011 at 12:35 pm

    Hi Toto,

    Just some info on comments posted earlier on the site.

    The stone structure between the Marbella and Almeda houses on Jacobo Gonzales (A. Mabini) Street (Nonie Agulto 3/3/11), according to Rene Manabat, was the residence of the Agaton Garcia. The Garcia family lived on top of the kamalig.

    Rene, also, identified the solid stone structure/façade beside the house of Don Menong Gana on Gen. M. M. Capinpin Street (Nonie Agulto 3/3/11) as the Marbella ancestral home.

    The child of Guido and Kulasa Garcia missing in the list of Cesar Cariño (3/07/11) is Cirilo, who married Balbina Alonte.

    Auntie Chit (Toto Gonzalez 3/16/11) or Cita (the original spelling was with a “Z” as in “Sta. Zita and Mary Rose”, the old Philippine TV novela of with Mary Rose Jacinto) Abad Dinglasan who tragically passed away last 16 March 2011, married the late Francisco Dinglasan and is the 4th child of Macaria Yatco Yaptinchay married to Eliseo K. Abad.

    Macaria Yaptinchay Abad is the elder sister of Tita Flory Yaptinchay Evangelista. (Main Yaptinchay Blog). They are daughters of Pablo, the youngest child and son of Alberto Yaptinchay y Carillo-Trinidad and Macaria Gana, who married Leonila Yatco y Mercado-Rizal (Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias 3/22/11).

    Cita (Zita) is the first cousin of Teddy Evanglista (Toto Gonzalez 10/19/10) and Tina married to David Robinson (Toto Gonzalez 10/19/10).

    Tony

  161. Ruby Dominguez said,

    March 31, 2011 at 2:34 am

    Message For: Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon

    SUBJECT: Dona Laura MARIANO wife of Don Pascual Lopez de Leon

    Dear Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon,

    My name is Ruby B. Dominguez, the family history researcher and GENI Family Tree creator. I am writing to you in the hope to discover the long, lost relatives of my first cousins on their mother side of the family, the MARIANO’S.

    Searching for possible blood relatives, I chanced upon your name and posts that may lead to a SHORT CUT to my research or a STOP SIGN to a misdirected search.

    I ask for your patience to please read on.

    As the story goes, LUCIANO MARIANO married Natalia Gonzalez of Calapan, Mindoro. Somewhere down the road during the American occupation, their son Macario was asked to change his surname because it sounded to the Americans that he had two names, rather than a name and surname.

    Thus, he chose the surname ADRIATICO and since then grandfathered this surname to his descendants.

    This is Macario MARIANO now an “Adriatico” and Laura MARIANO’S story:

    Description:
    Macario G. Adriatico – “Father of Manila City Charter”
    (1869-1919) Scholar and Parliamentarian
    Macario Adriatico, a distinguished scholar, parliamentarian, journalist, and author of Manila’s City Charter, was born in Calapan, Mindoro on March 10, 1869.

    VISIT THIS WEBSITE FOR FULL STORY on pages 186-190. Once on the webpage, you may type in Macario Adriatico to highlight his name. Laura MARIANO’S name whom I believed is his niece, is specially mentioned along with him in his own biography on page 186.

    http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924023221835#page/n201/mode/2up/search/macario+adriatico

    Your grandmother Laura MARIANO was born 1897 in Calapan, Mindoro. Her parents name were Gregorio MARIANO and Maria Monte. She married in March 9, 1921 your grandfather, Pascual Lopez de Leon who was born in 1894. I have a copy of their marriage certificate. Her husband’s parent’s names were Mariano Lopez de Leon and Isidra Potenciao.

    Interestingly, one of Macario “Adriatico’s” daughter named Lourdes “Adriatico” was married to a Jose P. de Leon and I was wondering if there is any blood relationship between Pascual and Jose?

    Herein in this very website is what Enrique Bustos shared with me:
    Enrique Bustos said,
    March 19, 2011 at 3:47 am
    “…One of Macario Adriatico’s daughter is the Late Socialite Lourdes A. de Leon. She married a son of Senator Ceferino de Leon of San Miguel Bulacan. Their children are Buda Samson, Teddy de Leon, and Lory Enriquez. Lourdes is a sister-in-law of the late First Lady Trining de Leon-Roxas…”
    —————————————————————
    Ruby Dominguez said,
    March 25, 2011 at 3:54 pm
    Dear Enrique Bustos,
    I appreciate the information you shared. I hope that I may be able to find some MARIANO relatives via this forum as well.
    Cheers,
    Ruby
    —————————————————————-

    Ruby Dominguez March 28 at 3:39pm
    Dear Jimmy Mariano,

    My name is Ruby B. Dominguez, the family history researcher and GENI Family Tree creator. I am writing to you in the hope to discover the long, lost relatives of my first cousins on their mother side of the family, the MARIANO’S.

    Searching for possible blood relatives, I chanced upon your name that may lead to a SHORT CUT to my research or a STOP SIGN to a misdirected search.

    My research compass may direct me properly upon knowing the name of your father, grandfather and great-grandfather. It is a very important link to the past. Please let me know.

    I ask for your patience to please read on.

    As the story goes, LUCIANO MARIANO, a CAVITENO married Natalia Gonzalez and relocated to Calapan, Mindoro. Somewhere down the road during the American occupation, he was asked to change his surname because it sounded to the Americans that he had two names, rather than a name and surname.

    Thus, he chose the surname ADRIATICO and since then grandfathered this surname to his descendants.

    Moving forward, Luciano Mariano now an “Adriatico” and Natalia Gonzalez had a son named MACARIO G. “ADRIATICO” and this is his story:

    Description:
    Macario G. Adriatico – “Father of Manila City Charter”
    (1869-1919) Scholar and Parliamentarian
    Macario Adriatico, a distinguished scholar, parliamentarian, journalist, and author of Manila’s City Charter, was born in Calapan, Mindoro on March 10, 1869 to Luciano Adriatico and Natalia Gonzales. His father, a native of Cavite, was clerk of the Court of the First Instance in Mindoro.
    After completing his primary education in Mindoro, Adriatico was sent to Manila in 1882 for further studies. Late for registering at the Ateneo Municipal, he entered the school of Hipolito Magsalin where he improved in Spanish and Latin, and later at the “Instituto Burgos” of Enrique Mendiola. From there, Adriatico proceeded to the San Juan de Letran, where he completed his Bachelor of Arts in 1889. Adriatico pursued studies in Medicine at the University of Santo Tomas but, later, shifted to Law. In 1902, Adriatico passed the bar examinations.
    A practicing, Adriatico went into journalism. His patriotic sentiments were transformed into his writings with patriotic tones, an interest that started even before the outbreak of the 1896 revolution. He formed a secret society called “Academy of Spanish Language and Literature” which, however, the Spanish authorities discovered and banned. This did not deter his spirit. He established a manuscript newspaper that was circulated secretly among his compatriots.
    Adriatico’s revolutionary activities became more known during the later part of revolution against Spain. He was among the revolutionary force that captured the remaining Spanish forces in Calapan in July 1898 and was behind the expeditionary force organized to liberate Romblon from the Spanish soldiers. When the First Philippine Republic was established, he was its Comandante de Estado Mayor. Like many Filipinos who desired independence from colonial masters, Adriatico fought against the Americans from 1899 to 1901. Soon, he went back to journalism. In 1907, he was editor of Diario de Filipinas and La Independencia. His writings also landed in other newspapers like El Renacimiento, La Cultura Filipina, El Ideal, and Domus Aurea among others under the pen names: C. Amori, Felipe Malay, Gat Rombiason, Maquiavello, Francachella and McYoa.
    In February 1904, he entered politics. He organized the Conservative Party that advocates preservation of the Hispanic heritage of the Filipinos and for Philippine independence. This party, however, failed to gain popularity because it did not sound nationalistic to the masses. Realizing the strong nationalist fervor of Filipinos, he joined Sergio Osmeña, Manuel L. Quezon, Alberto Barreto, and Justo Lukban among others. On January 17, 1907, Adriatico’s group formed the Partido Independencia Inmediatista (Immediate Independence Party), with him as secretary until the party merged with the Nationalist Union on March 12 that same year. Out of the merger of the two parties, the Nacionalista Party was born.
    In 1907, he won a seat in the first Philippine Assembly as representative of Mindoro, which he served for three consecutive terms (1907-1913). As member of the Assembly, he authored the Manila City Charter, which was enacted into Law (Act No. 176). When Manuel L. Quezon was appointed resident commissioner of the Philippines in the United States, Adriatico took his place as majority floor leader of the Congress where he eloquently participated in
    deliberations on appropriations, reorganization of government bureaus, on divorce and capital punishment.
    Also a writer, his literary works gained recognition. He was accepted in the Royal Academy of Madrid. After his stint in Congress where he became a known scholar and parliamentarian, he was appointed director of the Philippine Library and Museum, the first Filipino to hold the position, which he served, from 1917 to 1919.
    On April 14, 1919, Adriatico passed away, leaving his wife, Paula Lazaro and their eight daughters and two sons. In his honor, the Manila City Council changed the name of Dakota Street to Macario Adriatico in 1964.

    NOTE: Establishment of the close social circle between President Manuel L. Quezon and Macario G. Adriatico was that President Manuel L. Quezon was even a witness to one of Macario G. Adriatico’s daughter Emilia’s wedding as indicated in her marriage certificate to Emilio Pena.

    Please allow me to introduce to you the rest of the family’s Adriatico (MARIANO) brother and sister:

    1) MACARIO “Macky” Adriatico (MARIANO) – Dominguez
    Macky was the Philippine National Junior Champion when he came to Southern Illinois University to play varsity tennis on a four-year NCAA scholarship.

    2) 1972 Miss International Tokyo, Japan
    2nd Runner Up: PHILIPPINES – Yolanda (Yogi) ADRIATICO (MARIANO)-DOMINGUEZ

    For now this where my story shall rest. Until I hear from you to further explore the possibility of a blood connection which I hope there is.

    Sincerely,
    Ruby Dominguez
    dominguezruby@gmail.com

    P.S. I might have found your FB account and shall send you this same message.

  162. Arrah Carino Gonzales said,

    March 29, 2011 at 9:06 am

    I am from the Carinos who descended form the twin brothers from Ilocos, whose one twin became the first mayor of Binan after the war.Hope I could help and trace my roots at the same time.

  163. Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias said,

    March 23, 2011 at 4:42 pm

    I posted something about the Ocampo clan.

  164. Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias said,

    March 22, 2011 at 1:55 pm

    Hello to all the relatives.
    Let me expand the Ocampo Clan on post 107 by Cesar Carino.

    I am Jose Reynaldo Ocampo Cobarrubias. Son of Jose Livioco Cobarrubias Jr. and Norma Nolasco Ocampo Cobarrubias. Our great great grandfather is Dr. Jose Rizal y Mercado from Lola Bonifacia Rizal side.

    Let me start with the Ocampo family tree.

    Lolo Gil Ocampo married Lolo Magdalena Leyva Arevalo, son was Lolo Edilberto Ocampo, Mayor of Binan 1906-1909.
    2nd Generation
    Lolo Edilberto married Lola Ma. Paz Yatco y Rizal.
    3rd Generation
    Sons were Mauro Y. Ocampo and Vicente Y. Ocampo.

    Mauro Yatco Ocampo (Lolo Bolo) married Adoracion Amante Nolasco (Lola Adoracion).
    4th Generation
    Their children are Magdalena, Lourdes, Dolores, Norma & Mauro Jr.
    Magdalena (Nitang) married Felicito Gonzales, Lourdes (Ditas) married Dionisio Capunitan, Dolores (Lolita) Married Ramon Raymundo, Norma (Normie) married Jose L. Cobarrubias Jr. & Mauro Jr. married Imelda Morales.

    5th Generation
    Magdalena-Felicito has 6 kids: Mariano,Felnito, Jacobo, Pedro +, Felicito Jr. & Fernando
    Lourdes-Dionisio has 4 kid: Roberto; Josephine, Evelyn & Susan
    Dolores-Ramon has 4 kids: George; Fe Caridad, Jesus +, & Jim Anthony
    Norma-Jose has 6 kids: Jose Luis, Jose Fernando; Jose Reynaldo; Jose Marie +; Jose Victor & Ma. Kristina
    Mauro Jr.-Imelda has 5 kids: Adoracion; Mauro III, Erickson, Normadia, & Nowelyn

    Vicente Y. Ocampo (Lolo Enteng) married Maxima Mercado (Lola Chimang)
    3 kid: Leonardo, Renato & Erlinda

    Yatco-Rizal
    Lolo Ysidro Yatco married Lola Bonifacia Rizal has 3 kids. Ma. Salud married Pablo Perlas, Ma. Paz married Edilberto Ocampo & Ma. Leonila married Pablo Yatpinchay.

    Bustamante (Amante) Clan
    Adoracion Amante Nolasco clan. – Married Mauro Yatco Ocampo
    Padre Santiago Bustmante married Juana Villamor- only son Mariano
    Mariano V. Bustamante married Ma. Sorbito Regular only daugther Catalina.

    Nolasco clan.
    Eifemio Lim Yuatco Nolasco married Ma. Blasica Fernandez, only son Bibiano.

    Catalina Amante y Regular married Bibiano Fernandez Nolasco. only daugther Adoracion Nolasco y Amante (Lola Adoracion)

    My Auntie Nitang (Magdalena) Ocampo Gonzales holds the Ocampo tree.
    Thank you

  165. noni agulto said,

    March 22, 2011 at 5:39 am

    Dear Toto,

    @ entry number 2. Wow. I’m shocked. You were just chatting with her in this blogsite last year.

    My condolences, I know she’s family to you. God bless her soul.

  166. Jess Dimayuga Sanchez said,

    March 17, 2011 at 9:38 am

    Hi Ms. Tiongco,

    I am a descendant of Dr. Andres Tiongco Zavalla, he being the father of my mom, Fidelia Arellano Zavalla. My grandfather lived at the wrong time, this is what people would always say, they said he could have helped a lot more with his skills as a neurosurgeon.
    Sadly, the ancestral house in Santa Rosa got burned around 3 years ago. I also had fond memories of spending our Sundays there when my Lola Irma was still alive. I enjoyed the Santa Cruzans.

    Jess Vera Cruz, are you my UP classmate?

    Looking forward to more articles on this site.

  167. March 16, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    Goodbye, Auntie Chit.

    Say hello to Uncle Paco for me. I wonder if it will be back to…

    Paco: “Che-eht, Che-eht, Che-eht…” [ in endearing Capiznon-accented English ]

    Chit: “For chrissakes, Paco, it’s Chit as in Shit!!!” [ in a cosmopolitan Stanford California accent ]

    I will always remember you in those chic Carolina Herrera, Yves Saint Laurent, and Valentino dresses along with the equally chic bags, shoes, and jewelry. You were a class act.

    In loving memory of Cita Yaptinchay Abad-Dinglasan…

    with lots of love, kisses, and embraces,

    Toto Gonzalez

  168. Gilbert N. Almeda said,

    March 15, 2011 at 6:11 pm

    Well it’s so nice that my son jap, a graduating med proper student from La Salle stumbled on this site and sent it to me. It’s almost 2 am and enjoyed reading it. I think i still have a family tree listing done by Tito Teddy Yaptinchay Evangelista, way way back, and anybody is welcome to see it. it’s more of the Yaptinchay/Yatco family lineage. Presently, i am now the occupant/caretaker of the ancestral home of the clan of Maria Gana Yaptinchay/Andres Almeda. I am doing my best to maintain the ancestral home, and i have even told my eldest son, that he will be the next projected caretaker/occupant of the ancestral home and will continue to pass on the job, to his son and so on, as a sign of our respect to our Ancestry.
    I was wondering if anyone knows anything about the roots of Andres Almeda, husband of Kapitan Maria Yaptinchay They say he is related to the Tiongco’s of Sta. Rosa City, and that’s all the info i have. I am the grandson of Antonio Almeda, son of Maria Gana Yaptinchay Almeda, my father is Alberto, 3rd of the siblings of Antonio and Ricarda, other children are Julita, Justa, & Andres, and sad to say are all deceased. i hope every single relative can keep track of the latest info on the ever growing, and expanding family tree. keep on the good work, and Cesar Carino, I hope to see you soon when you come for a visit as a balikbayan. regards to everyone.

  169. noni agulto said,

    March 9, 2011 at 1:31 am

    @ kuya tony:

    Thanks for the info. Quite true…the Agulto siblings (Leonarda, Crispino and Apolonia) were the last children of GGY on record, born out of wedlock.

    Lola Leonor (Agulto) told us that the Agulto surname was a “gift” to them…being illegitimate children of GGY. However, in Cesar Carino’s research, Isidra Bergonia was married to a certain Agulto – which made her…Isidra Agulto after all . I don’t know maybe this was even before her relationship with Guido Y. since lola made no mention of a step or foster father image. Isidra must have been widowed or separated from her husband during this period.

    Also interesting to note is the property that was bequeathed to our family (to my grandparents) were no longer from Don Guido Yaptinchay…rather…they were from Albina (Lola Binang) -said to have been purchased by Lola Binang from her own money. They said GGY’s property had already been divided right before the time the Agulto kids were growing. Lola Binang stood as their financial guardian. – that was according to Lola Leonor.

    best

    Noni

  170. Cesar Carino said,

    March 7, 2011 at 2:57 am

    Tony,

    Thanks for your great entry on Guido’s decendants. There are names that I do not have that I just learned from you, and I have added then on my file.

    I have a question: On my record I only have 6 children of Guido and Kulasa Garcia, they are Tomasa, Leoncio, Gregorio, Calixta, Salud, and Librado. Do you happen to know the name of one that I’m missing?

    Thanks a lot.

    Cesar

  171. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    March 3, 2011 at 8:57 am

    Hi Toto,

    Yes, Rafael (Lito) Hocson is 2 years my senior both in high school and college. I am more familiar with his older brother, Vic, as he and his “barkada” were the ones who taught me how to drink scotch “neat,” that is, just whiskey, no ice. His sister, Teresita, is married to my classmate Jose (Toto) Jalandoni from Bacolod.

    Attached is a file on Guido Gana Yaptinchay. This file developed as a result of the story of Noni Agulto’s family name, the search of Dorotea Alonte Acuña for Guillermo Yaptinchay, and finding the ancestry of Tita Letty Yaptinchay-Yatco, Ninong Leony’s wife.

    regards.

    Tony

    **************************************************
    ON GUIDO GANA YAPTINCHAY

    In the 1998 Yaptinchay tree of Nena Yaptinchay Zamora, Guido Gana Yaptinchay was the 3rd child and 2nd son of Alberto Trinidad Yaptinchay and Macaria Gana (Alicia Perez 02/15/10).

    Guido G. Yaptinchay married Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto and they had 9 children. There was only 1 girl (Nonie Agulto 06/01/10), the 3rd child, Albina Alberto Yaptinchay, and she never got married.

    The tree had no mention about the families of the some of the children of Guido and Agustina, except that the eldest, Felix, got married to Josefa C. Gana and the 2nd, Francisco, married Josefa Carrillo Trinidad, the 5th, Isidro, married Francisca Morando, and the 8th child, Librado (Privado), was assumed to have remained single.

    The 4th child, Agapito, married to Avelina (Belen) Luna from Malabon. They were the parents of Tita Letty L. Yaptinchay (Alicia Perez 02/15/10) married to Tito Leony (Dr. Leoncio) G. Yatco (Noni Agulto 02/26/10; Rafael G. Hocson 09/05/10). Tita Letty had 2 brothers, Tito Angel married Rafaela (Tita Feling) Gana (Lucy Francisco Borromeo 09/22/10) and Tito Oscar married Leonor Bedia.

    Miguel, the 6th child, married Maria Mateo. They had an only child, Guillermo. There was no mention of who Guillermo (Mimoy/Moy) Mateo Yaptinchay got married to and with whom he had 2 children, Sylvia married to Reynaldo Garcia and Maria Leticia married to Rafael Medel, Sr. He could be the Guillermo Yaptinchay referred to by Dorotea Alonte Acuña (05/30/10).

    The 7th child, Alberto, married Milagros Marfori. They had 1 son, Horacio, and 4 daughters. Their 2nd daughter, Carmen, married Quirino Apacible from Batangas. The 7th child and 4th son of Carmen and Quirino Apacible, Victor, is the parish Priest of the National Shrine of the Sacred Heart in Makati City.

    Agustin, the 9th child, married Francisca Amoranto and had 2 daughters.

    After Agustina Sanchez de Carabaca Alberto passed away, the widower, Guido, had a relationship, first with Nicolasa Garcia, with whom he had 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls, all surnamed Garcia. Guido’s relationship with Nicolasa was followed by a relationship with Catalina Sta. Ana Medel, with whom Guido had 4 children, 1 boy and 3 girls, all surnamed Medel. Guido’s last relationship was with Isidra C. Bergonia, with whom he had 3 children, 1 boy and 2 girls, all surnamed Agulto (Nonie Agulto 04/16/10).

  172. noni agulto said,

    March 3, 2011 at 3:24 am

    Hi Everyone!

    Regarding tony cuyegkeng’s entry number12 ( i think “kuya” tony is a 3rd cousin looking at the family tree)…. the stone structure (from floor up) between the Marbella ancestral house and the Almeda house; was that a kamalig or a real residence?…that is now more popularly know as lily’s bookstore. It devolved to aling lily but from which side of her family?

    Also, on another area right beside the don menong house, separated only by an eskinita, a solid stone structure/facade (arch and windows probably ground floor of a torn down ancestral house still stands. Who’s property is this? looking at the same property from the other side of the road (back), there’s and enclosed adobe elevation that looks like a swimming pool to me…but it must have been a kamalig or some sort of storage before…

    so many nice properties that i wish government and private owners can pay more attention to…. if we were to use these properties, we might as well incorporate the existing structures as part of the new building and echo the architectural style of the newer construction based on the exisiting design to which they are building up on.

    Perlas House is also up for grabs… looks like SM and pure gold are eying the property…kawawang bahay…it would have been great if the house was preserved because of its unique structural features.

  173. Cesar Carino said,

    March 3, 2011 at 3:06 am

    Noni,

    Yes, both Francisca and Donata Gana married a Carrillo. Francisca married Juan Carrillo, their children that I found were Adriana, married to Pastor de Silva (mayor of Binan 1900-1906), Miguela married Florencio Guico, Pomposa married to Potenciano de Silva brother of Pastor, and Simona married to Justiniano Jaojoco.

    Donata Gana was married to Ambrosio Carrillo, I am still looking for his relationship to Juan. Their children that I have were, Primo married to Rosario (Rosa) Gana, daughter of Jose Gana, Agapita married Fernando Guico, and Felipa married to Engracio Antonio.

    Agapita and Miguela were cousins. Yes the family tree is expanding.

  174. noni agulto said,

    March 2, 2011 at 8:10 am

    Toto,

    I didn’t notice, this blog pala celebrated its 1st anniversary last February…hehehe…happy anniversary to everybody who contributed here. You don’t know how much your contributions mean to us who have been trying to construct the family trees of our major families.

    all the best

    Noni

  175. noni agulto said,

    February 28, 2011 at 10:34 am

    Hi Tito Cesar!

    Wow. Another question… in the Gana family tree, Francisca Gana has a sister Donata who is said to be married to another carrillo (unamed) would that be just a typo or would it be possible that Donata and Francisca were both married to a gana? hmmmm

    And how would agapita and miguella be related… the tree is moving by the day…hahaha

    best

    Noni

  176. Cesar Carino said,

    February 22, 2011 at 5:43 pm

    Noni,

    I am sure Tita Nena would have been excited with the new information that’s being found.

    Yes Pedro and Florentino Guico were brothers. The children of Florentino and Miguela Carrillo that I have identified were Teodora, Felix, and Eduardo, I’m also assuming Isabel, and Maria to be their children too. Yes they were Pedro’s nephews and nieces. Miguela Carrillo was the daughter of Juan Carrillo and Francisca Reyes Gana, daughter of Gaspar de los Reyes Gana and Gertrudes Santimora Roberta.

    I’ve noticed in the records that the children of Gaspar Gana were using Reyes as their middle name. I am assuming that this was done to differetiate their family from the decendants of Tomasa whose last name was Apolonia.

  177. noni agulto said,

    February 21, 2011 at 10:07 am

    @ Cesar Cariño:

    This is becoming very interesting. regarding your entry number 24, now i’m trying to figure out where to put the descendants of Miguella Carrillo.

    In the docs sent to me by tita nena zamora, miguella carrillo was married to faustino guico (brother of anastacio and son of Pedro Guico and Isabel Yaptinchay. Your discovery however states that Miguella Carrillio was married to Florentino (brother of Pedro Guico) which changes the whole landscape….

    All the children of Miguella and (Florentino- not Faustino):

    Isidra C. Guico married to Ignacio Yatco
    Maria C. Guico married to Fernando Belizario
    Eduardo C. Guico married to (1) Leonila Lopez de Leon & (2) Guillerma Evasco
    therefore would all be nephews and nieces of Pedro rather than his grandchildren….

    ???????

  178. noni agulto said,

    February 21, 2011 at 3:50 am

    @ Cesar Carino:

    Thanks for the additional information. Made the necessary adjustments in my family tree. =)

    best

    noni

  179. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 20, 2011 at 7:02 am

    Rizal women: Then & now
    SECOND WIND By Barbara C. Gonzalez The Philippine Star

    She was 27 years old when they got married. He was tall, a mestizo, handsome, according to my cousin, Toto Cruz. He was 19 years old. Today, we would have called her a puma — below 40 hanging out with younger men? But she wasn’t hanging out with him. She was marrying him. At the altar, they say, when he was putting the wedding ring on her finger, he accidentally dropped it, and the ring rolled away. Their guests must have gasped. Malas! (Bad luck!) And in a way, that’s what happened.

    She was Maria Mercado, the sixth daughter of Francisco Mercado and Teodora Alonso, the sister immediately preceding their son, Jose Mercado, later Jose Rizal. He was Daniel Cruz from Biñan. They had five children but only two of them lived. Stories I heard from the family said she was terribly jealous — as who would not be if she had married a younger, handsome man — so she went and followed him around, carrying her umbrella with her, perhaps to hit him on the head, if she caught him. I wonder — did she catch him? I don’t remember hearing any such stories.

    The two children who lived were Mauricio and Encarnacion Mercado Cruz. Mauricio Cruz was my grandfather, my mother’s father and her idol. She claimed to be his favorite daughter. She remembers her mother asking her to call him at the Club — wherever that was — to ask him to come home early. He would ask my mother what sandwich he might bring her if he came home late.

    The story I remember hearing from my grandmother is how Lola Angge, that’s how she called Maria, initially wanted to share the marital bed with her and Morris, my lolo’s nickname. I found that funny when I heard it the first time. I was a little girl around five years old. I thought then that married people never slept with their parents. It wasn’t the custom. Now, at my age, I find it hilarious. Why did she want to sleep with them? What did she not want them to do?

    The years passed. Mauricio, his son Ismael, and his son-in-law Vladimir Gonzalez, my father, were all killed by the Japanese at the end of World War II. Much later, my grandmother died. Her grandchildren were led by three girls. The oldest was Gemma Cruz, then I, then Noelle Syquia. We all married terribly young. Eventually we separated. Noelle parted from her husband first but she was sent to Germany. Gemma separated last then went to Mexico. I separated and stayed. My family stopped talking to me. I thought it was because I had broken a family tradition. I thought everyone in my family before the three of us cousins had stayed married.

    But over time they got over it and we were once again friends, when there were no more men in my life.

    Then one Sunday in 1988, we had a family lunch at my cousin Mia Syquia Faustmann’s house. After lunch I was drinking coffee when one of my aunts mentioned that Lola Angge was separated from her husband Lolo Daniel. “What?” I gasped. “All this time I thought you stopped talking to me because I had broken a family tradition. Apparently, I was following one.”

    One Sunday in the early 1900s, I suppose, Lolo Daniel asked Lola Angge if she had any money. He was going to the cockfights and he had no cash. Lola said, “Here is my last peseta (50 centavos then, quite enough money). I am putting it on the table. If you take it, I promise you your children and I will not be here when you return. And we are never coming back.” She put the peseta on the table. He took it. He came back to an empty house.

    My great-grandmother went home to her father’s house.

    She and her children lived there for a while. Then later on she settled in San Pablo, where she is buried today, close to her daughter Encarnacion and Encarnacion’s children, Pacita and Marita. I know that she had a house in San Pablo. At some time she had a boxing ring, where she and my Lolo Morris would hold fights and charge admission. She became a highly successful entrepreneur, acquired much property, became independently wealthy. She was one of the early single mothers.

    Why did they not tell us? No one told me until 1988 when I was 44 years old that I had not broken a family tradition. Our family tradition was single parenthood and I had kept it. In fact most of us – my cousins and I – had kept this single parenthood tradition. It began four generations before us. It began with Lola Maria, whom my grandmother called Lola Angge, but whom her family called Lola Biang.

    Maybe because she was a single mother, there are many claimants to her throne. The Philippine Historical Commission, I am told, has received many requests for aid from people who claim to be descendants of Maria. They ask the family to verify. We do verify. One of them was apparently run over by a vehicle and wanted to ask for support but when we computed her age versus Lola Biang’s, it said she must have given birth at 60, so that was not possible.

    When I lived in San Francisco, I met a woman who, as I was taking her on a tour of a friend’s house told me, “Do you know I am a Rizal descendant?”

    “No, I’m sorry, I didn’t know,” I said, thinking she was descended from his other sisters, so I asked, “Which sister?”

    “Maria,” she said haughtily.

    “I am a descendant of Maria,” I said, “and I know all of my cousins.”

    I gave her a quizzical look but she changed the subject. She was related to Daniel Cruz not to his wife Maria. She could not lay claim to one drop of Mercado/Rizal blood.

    Why do I write all this now? It is Jose Rizal’s 150th birthday. We have to bring him to life for the youth. We have to turn him into a real person. He was like one of us. Nothing supremely extraordinary about him except he had courage and values. His family was not perfect. It was imperfect. He himself was not perfect. He was short. He had a complex. He liked being heroic. He wrote Noli Me Tangere, which turned into the novel that made the Filipinos aware of the rut they were in and got that circulated, an amazing feat, considering there were no paper copiers then. How could his book cause such a furor?

    I am a descendant by sheer accident of my birth. I had nothing to do with it but I was given a small amount of his blood and maybe a little bit of his genes. So I write these stories to tell the world. He came from a regular family. His sister left her husband and struck off on her own and became a successful entrepreneur. Quite a few of us inherited her blood and her spirit.

    One of my uncles used to say. There are three things you cannot do in this life. One, you cannot paint the sky blue. Two, you cannot pour the ocean into a hole. Three, you cannot win an argument with a Rizal woman.

    The third one is so true.

  180. Cesar Carino said,

    February 19, 2011 at 6:04 am

    @ Rina Telen, and UPDATE ON GANA’S ANCESTRY

    Since you mentioned you are related to former justice Milagros German, I happened to have her name on file as she was related to the Gana’s of Binan. Milagros was the youngest of 8 children of Fernando German and Agrifina Amoranto who was the daughter of Maximo Amonranto and Isabel Gana. Isabel was the daughter of Jose Gana and Regina Marvillas Custodio. Jose was the son Vicente Tang Gana and Tomasa Apolonia.

    Apolonia was Tomasa’s family name, I found on film of Binan’s church records just recently. Also found was Gaspar Gana’s wife, Gertrudes Santimora Roberta (of chinese decent). It was assumed that Gertrudes was the name of Vicente Tang Gana’s 1st wife, Tomasa was the 2nd.

    It was known and record shows that Gaspar uses de los Reyes as his middle name, which could be assumed as his mother’s last name. Vicente Tang Gana’s 1st wife is therefore _______?________de los Reyes, and the 2nd wife was Tomasa Apolonia. Gaspar de los Reyes Gana was married to Gertrudes Santimora Roberta.

    Just sharing with you all the recent Gana Ancestry revision I made based on information found.

    Cesar Carino

  181. noni agulto said,

    February 16, 2011 at 7:36 am

    @ Rina Telen:

    I was checking the Gana Family tree and you must come from the Ciriaco Gana line.

    Ciriaco Gana, who is son of Eulalio Gana and Florentina Potenciano – and brother to Eduardo (married to Filomena Ocampo), Jesualdo (Crisanta Cruz & Petronilla Carrillo-Trinidad), Flaviana (Mariano Lopez), and Teodora) married two Germans consecutively: Leonarda German and Francisca German, before marrying his 3rd wife, Carmen Francisco.

    This line traces from the marriage of Don Vicente Tang-Gana and his second wife, Tomasa

    =)

    best

    Noni Agulto

  182. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 15, 2011 at 3:19 am

    How would you feel?
    SECOND WIND By Barbara C. Gonzalez The Philippine Star

    You are a good woman, not flawless. Sometimes you’re cranky, impatient, vociferous, a nagger but, overall, a good woman. You are a good wife. You bore 11 children! You must have been a good wife. You are a wonderful mother, always attending to the children, always educating the girls. The schools then did not accept girl students so you gave them home schooling, taught them yourself to read, write, count, develop strength of character.

    Maybe you were a good daughter, that’s why you were an educated woman and could pass on what you learned as a child to your children. You were an impeccable sister to your favorite younger brother, Jose, who came to you one night and whispered the darkest of secrets. “Saturnina (your oldest daughter) and I have had secret meetings,” he murmured so no one would hear, “and now she is with child. Forgive us, my dear sister, and help us keep this secret.

    “My wife, Teodora, your namesake, will murder me if she finds out. I suggest you take Ninay to a nunnery, now while it’s early and no one suspects yet. Then you can go and pick her up, stay long, too. When you return you can bring back the baby and claim it as yours.”

    “Please, mother,” your daughter whispers through tears.

    “I will pay for everything, don’t worry about expenses,” he whispers.

    Dumbfounded, pained, angry, loving, torn apart inside, tears streaming down your face, you realize you cannot do anything except accept his request. If you express your anger and pain you would throw them both out of the house. Then there will be scandal. The friars might get so inflamed you might lose your rental rights to the property. What about your brother Jose’s knighthood that you fought so hard for? If there is a scandal, everyone’s life will turn to ashes. What can you do but agree and swallow the pain that cuts through you. You swallow it and carry it around, a knife blade in your gut.

    It must have taken two years to get all that done. In the meantime, Jose’s wife, the other Teodora, who was a peninsular, kept traveling back and forth to Spain. It seems she hated being in Biñan, probably was unhappy being the wife of your brother. One night, the rumor goes, Jose came home and found his house empty. His wife had gone to sleep at her lover’s home. Her lover — or so they say — was the captain of the police or what they then called the guardia civil.

    Jose came to you again, this time in the bright light of day. “Please, ate, talk to her again. She brings me shame. What will happen to my knighthood? That’s what’s at stake here.”

    “Ninay and I will come,” you said, giving him a sharp look, forbidding him from protest. You thought: to teach all of you a lesson.

    So you went and cooked merienda for Teodora Formoso Alberto, all the while thinking of what you would say. You served her in the dining room. You waited for her to invite you to sit but instead she came in carrying a small pet dog. She sat, put the dog on her lap and looked you up and down, left and right. You could feel her anger. She took the plate you gave her and lay it on the floor. Then she took her pet dog and set it down beside your plate. “Taste it, my little one,” she said, her eyes never leaving your face. The dog ate your merienda, just a little bit. Then it made a sound, like a dull yelp, then it had convulsions and it dropped dead. What a shock that must have been to you. The dog ate your food and dropped dead!

    She stood up imperiously and ordered the servants to call the guardia civil. She accused you of trying to poison her. “I did not,” you say, still in shock, still horrified that her dog dropped dead after eating what you cooked. “I did not do that.” But by then her lover walked in, so quickly, like he was just waiting outside. He arrested you and made you walk from Biñan to Sta. Cruz where you were kept in jail. For how long, I wonder. There seems to be some proof found that after two years they asked you to sign a confession to the crime — that you had attempted to poison the other Teodora. But nobody knows — or I have not heard — if you signed it and how long you stayed in jail.

    How would you feel if you were Teodora Alonso? A good woman, a good wife, an outstanding mother, a supportive sister. How would you feel if all these happened to you? At the very least I would feel unduly restrained, profoundly angered, extremely frustrated. I would have been ready to kill. Instead she stayed in jail and developed glaucoma so she could see less and less because if she could see everything that had happened to her and everything else that was going to happen to her clearly, she would have gone mad.

    Why did we not tell these stories before? Why did we keep them secret? The friars are long gone. The world has changed. These stories don’t diminish women. It makes them heroic. And yet these stories were only whispered about through five generations even if today they read like a telenovela plot. Imagine all the emotions suppressed. Don Francisco Mercado — how did he feel about all the things happening in his family? How did he feel about his wife’s handling of all her little brother’s problems? Was he not a bit jealous? Saturnina? What made her succumb to her uncle? Was it love or was it child molestation? How did everybody feel?

    How we feel about something and our willingness to discuss it shows other people what others feel. They learn from it. We can learn so much from each other’s lives. Can you imagine the pain a mother feels when she sees her son’s execution in her mind’s eye? Can you imagine the pain of mothers whose sons are salvaged? Nobody has to become a national hero to speak about such grief. You only have to find the courage to talk.

    Doña Teodora Alonso was my great-great-grandmother. She was the mother of my great-grandmother Maria Mercado, Jose Rizal’s older sister. As I age I cannot help but be in awe of their lives. In the end I struggle with only one important question whose answer I will never know. That question is: How did they really feel?

  183. Rina Gana-Telen said,

    February 9, 2011 at 4:35 pm

    Hello and good day! I will appreciate if somebody can share information about the German-Gana Family for I belong to this clan. My lolo’s name is Agapito German Gana and I am also related to former Justice Milagros German. Thank you very much.

  184. February 6, 2011 at 2:17 pm

    just two corrections, tony (cuyegkeng) – i think you were my junior in college at the ateneo? the cobeng house was the property of maria ocampo gana, a spinster sister of filomeno ocampo gana, who inherited the property on the death of maria gana at the end of wwII. Tio Polding and Tia Rosing Francisco asked lolo menong if they could rent it as one of the first post world war 11 hospital. , sta tereita hispital..after a while cobeng make an offer to puchase the property (fpr P15OOO which as you said extended from capinpin to -to gonzales streets. The front of the property fronted ngonnnzales street and where the hospital building has located. the back portion was just an undeveoped lot where rizal used to study. On the capinpin st (it used to be called paterno street. The house of Lolo Memong Gana was noa house of Filomena, but rather of filomeno, married to susan munoz toribio of meycauyan. a final note. noli gana street is a misnomer. the old street is Noli Street, but in the fifties it was reanamed fom the Noli Street to Filioneno Gamna. Filomeno Gana, Jose Jatco ang and one other were instrumental in putting up a a rizal memorial in the town plaza, presmably smaller lang than the one at luneta.

  185. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    February 6, 2011 at 10:34 am

    Hi Toto,

    Attached is a short article on the bahay-na-batos in Binan. As mentioned, this was done in consultation with my cousin, Charie Mercado.

    Regards.

    Tony

    ************************************************

    Bahay-na-Bato

    After the war, there was quite a number of bahay-na-bato in Biñan. They were mostly located along A. Mabini (Jacobo Gonzales) Street going towards Barrio San Antonio.

    Starting at the plaza and going towards Bo. San Antonio along A. Mabini was the bahay-na-bato inherited by Flora (Tita Flory) Yatco Yaptinchay, married to Teodoro Evangelista. It was across the church and the lot extended all the way to Gen. Mateo M. Capinpin Street. It is now part bus terminal, part public market.

    Further down A. Mabini and on the same side of the road as the Evangelista house is bahay-na-bato were Francisco Almeda married to Alita Capinpin, the only daughter of General Mateo M. Capinpin lived. Across the Almeda house is the residence of Judge Milagros German.

    After the eskenita from the Almeda house is the bahay-na-bato Congressman Jacobo “Cobeng” Gonzales. Like the lot of Tita Flory, the Cobeng lot also stretched to Gen. M. Capinpin St. Prior to the acquisition by Cobeng, it housed the old Sta. Teresita Hospital of Dr. and Dra. Rosita (Rosing) Francisco (Rafael G. Hocson 09/21/10).

    Across the Cobeng house was the Casas maternal house given by the spinster Josefa Yaptinchay y Gana, the sister of Kapitang Maria, to Encarnacion Almeda Casas. The Casas house is, also, separated from Judge German’s house by an eskenita.

    In the late 1950’s the movie on the life of General Jose Ignacio Pawa was filmed Biñan using both the old Sta. Teresita Hospital and the Casas maternal house as venues of the movie.

    After Cobeng, was the old Biñan Theater of the Carillo’s. The residence of Dr. Antonio (Tony) Carillo’s was across Biñan Theater. The Carillo residence, which is now an parking lot with a shut down movie house in the rear, was an unusual bahay-na-bato. While the standard bahay-na-bato had a solid stone frontage, the Carillo house had the major portion of the house frontage , an open air azotea, the the stone railings of which could be seen on top of the Sy Se Giap Lumber. The side railings of the azotea was longer than the side of the Casas house. The rooms and the rest of the house were located on the side and at the back of the patio.

    The next bahay na bato is Gan maternal house located after the old Biñan Theater. After the Gan house is the yellow colored bahay-na-bato of the Potenciano’s (Michael Potenciano Almendral 07/26/10).

    On Gen. M. M. Capinpin St., the street parallel to A. Mabini, are the Yaptinchay’s bahay-na-bato maternal house (Noni Agulto 06/29/10), which no longer exists, and the Filomena Gana maternal house.

    The other bahay-na-bato’s were the one of the Alberto’s located at the town plaza facing the municipio. Towards the back of the Alberto house and facing the plaza is Ligaya Theater, noted for the pospas na goto of Tonio Sevilla, which becomes available at the end of the first showing in the afternoon, around 3:00 PM. The third movie theater in town was Victory Theater located P. Burgos St.

    After the plaza, on A. Mabini Street going to Barrio De La Paz were the bahay-na-bato of the Perlas family, which is also gone, and, further on, the house of Antonio Yaptinchay Almeda married to Ricarda Sta. Ana Medel.

    These 2 main streets of the poblacion, A. Mabini (Jacobo Gonzales) and Gen. M. Capinpin Streets are connected in the middle by the eskenita running alongside the Almeda and Cobeng residences. The eskinita actually started on P. Burgos St., cutting through the middle of Dr. Antonio Gonzales, General M. Capinpin, and A. Mabini (Jacobo Gonzales) Streets and ending on the Biñan River. The eskenita serves as a pedestrian’s short connecting the 3 streets, thus avoiding the need to go to the plaza or to what is now known as the Noli Gana Road, to go from one street to the other.

    The open canal on the side of the eskenita served as a drain for the excess rain water on rice fields that used to be found behind the Dona Aurora Elementary School on P. Burgos St. during the rainy season. These rice fields used to extend to beyond the old National Highway.

  186. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 5, 2011 at 4:13 am

    Almost 200 years ago
    SECOND WIND By Barbara C. Gonzalez The Philippine Star

    Last Monday night, I stayed up until 11:30 p.m. to watch Channel 7’s I-Witness titled “Mga Lihim ni Rizal.”

    Howie Severino, an old writer friend from my Chronicle days, had interviewed me for this show and I wanted to know how it came out. Let me now say it was a beautiful documentary, very well-planned, with interviews, a bit of theater acting, a lot of on-the-spot filming. I simply don’t understand why such documentaries are shown so late at night when they should really be closer to primetime or shown on weekend afternoons so young people can watch. But that assumes that media wants to play a role in the development of our youth. Their record shows they do not.

    This year, had he lived, Jose Rizal would have been 150 years old. His mother, Teodora Alonso, is also celebrating the 100th year anniversary of her death. Yet the mysteries in their lives continue to be unspoken. The question of illegitimacy is one of them.

    In the family, there has been a whispered myth about the legitimacy of Teodora Alonso. They murmur that she and a sister were illegitimate but close friends of their father’s legitimate sons. This gossip, coupled with the sale of the Alberto house in Biñan, must have provoked Howie into research. He found out that the father of Teodora Alonso and Jose Alberto was Lorenzo Alberto Alonso. In his early 20s, for reasons unknown and undisclosed (after all it must have happened almost 200 years ago,) probably political or financial, Lorenzo Alberto Alonso went to Vigan to marry a young girl of 12, whose name was Paula Florentino.

    “Don’t you remember?” my cousin, Mia Syquia Faustmann said. We ate at a restaurant in Vigan that said it was owned by her family. She became a poetess or something. I only vaguely remembered.

    After the wedding Lorenzo Alberto Alonso came back to Biñan and probably never went back. They had no children. Ten years later in Biñan he lived with Brigida Quintos and together they had five children. The second was Teodora Alonso and the youngest was Jose Alberto. All of these five children were illegitimate. Lorenzo Alberto Alonso could not marry Brigida Quintos because he had been married before and therefore could not get permission to marry again. So they lived together and had five children who, in the eyes of the law, were all illegitimate.

    But if he had no children with his legitimate wife, an old lawyer friend of mine says, then they would have been treated as legitimate children under the law in terms of property after he died.

    Maybe, I said, but nevertheless their legal status was illegitimate. Was that fair?

    Sometime in his life, Lorenzo Alberto Alonso got knighthood from Queen Isabela of Spain. But when it arrived in the Philippines, Lorenzo was dead. Apparently knighthood can be inherited by legitimate sons so it was presumed that the family (according to the documentary) met and agreed that Jose Alberto and his brother would become legitimate sons. That way Jose Alberto could position himself as heir to the knighthood. Perhaps this is what gave rise to the story that Teodora Alonso and Jose Alberto were half-brothers. In fact, they were full brothers, both of them illegitimate, because their father had married a much younger woman (but had not lived with her) and then later on lived with their mother. The earlier marriage would have been annullable under the old laws if it was unconsummated. But then this was an even older situation. Almost 200 years old and the friars then had full reign.

    That’s the first secret. Now I ask — why did it take us so long to talk about it? There are no more friars in the Philippines. The friars, remember, were the church and the state rolled into one. If they told you that you could not marry, you could not marry. That was the final answer. You could live together — as Lorenzo Alberto Alonso and Brigida Quintos and in the next generation as Jose Rizal and Josephine Bracken did — to rebel against such unreasonable laws. Then they condemned you but what harm did that do? Nothing. They said you would go to hell but no one could certify that you did.

    What is the difference between life then and life now? We do exactly the same things. The difference is then we whispered about it. These days — almost 200 years later — I am willing to talk about it because I believe in telling the truth. If the friars, who were men, then allowed it, Lorenzo and Brigida could have married and had legitimate children.

    Since the friars disapproved, they had five illegitimate children. The behavior of Lorenzo and Brigida did not change. They decided to have five illegitimate children followed by much shushing through the generations. Instead of an everybody-happy situation you have everybody told to shut up. Is that reasonable behavior? What happens to our humanity? Do we simply shush it?

    It has been almost 500 years since the Spanish landed. We need to tell the truth. We need to become contemporarily liberal. Spain is contemporarily liberal. They have divorce and their churches are taxed. We were just a little Spanish colony and we still haven’t changed.

    That’s not the only secret of the Rizal family. There are more. Watch the documentary “Mga Lihim ni Rizal” on your computer at http.www.pinoytube.tv/action/viewvideo/21043/I_WITNESS–01_31_2011_courtesy_of_GMA7/.

    It is an excellent, interesting documentary.

  187. Christopher Yatco said,

    February 4, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Hi, I believe that architect Jorge Y. Ramos descended from the Jose Yatco-Victoria Almeda line. I hope Tito Maning will confirm this.

  188. Presy Guevara said,

    February 1, 2011 at 1:21 am

    Thanks for the heads-up Enrique. I will watch for the show although as of today our TV Guide on GMA does not list i Witness after Saksi. I wonder how much variation there would be from the account on Teodora Alonzo’s detention on page 19-20 of the book “Jose Rizal Filipino Doctor and Patriot” written by Jose Baron Fernandez. JBF seems to be the only Spaniard who wrote about Dr. JPR. He went through Archives of the Spanish Government to write about our national hero. Unfortunately, printing on p.10 of the family tree by Dr. JPR showed more the age of the document than its content.

  189. Enrique Bustos said,

    January 30, 2011 at 8:45 am

    MGA LIHIM NG PAMILYA RIZAL
    Dokumentaryo ni Howie Severino

    Every family has its secrets, even the Rizals of Calamba, among the most important families in Philippine history.

    In the year that he died, 1896, Jose Rizal made his family tree. Interestingly, he left out the branches leading to his mother Teodora Alonzo. What was he trying to hide?

    Howie Severino and his documentary team investigate Teodora’s roots in Biñan, Laguna where they find her ancestral home still standing but being demolished brick by brick. Their probe reveals stories about betrayal, children out of wedlock, family quarrels, and an attempted murder charge that landed Teodora in jail for two years when Rizal was a child.

    Tracking down a descendant of the family, Howie learns of another family secret that may be the most shocking of all.

    As this descendant said, “You don’t have to come from a perfect family to become a hero.”

    “Mga lihim ng pamilya Rizal” airs on I-Witness this January 31, 2011 Monday after Saksi

  190. Antonio C. Cuyegkeng said,

    January 21, 2011 at 10:57 pm

    This is another version as to the background of the devotion of Alberto Yaptinchay’s family to the Souls in Purgatory.

    On February 16, 2010, Noni Agulto cited the background of the of the devotion of Alberto Yaptinchay’s family to the Souls in Purgatory according to Loudette Tapia-Tolosa. Loudette is the granddaughter of Esteban (Lolo Teban) Almeda, married to Lazara Sabas. Loudettte’s mother, Lolita, was the eldest of Lolo Teban’s 5 children. The other children of Lolo Teban were Encarnacion married to Antonio Gomez, Generosa married Porfirio La Torre, Cesar married to Caridad Vergel de Dios, and Natividad married Francisco Tankiang.

    Lolo Teban was the younger brother of Encarnacion (Lola Oneng) Almeda married to Francisco Casas.

    According to Lola Oneng, it was Kapitang Maria, Maria Gana Yaptinchay, who had the business acumen that grew and managed the family fortune. Andres Almeda was more of a gentleman farmer and a known “sabongero.” There was a story that Kapitang Maria kept her savings of gold coins inside tapayans of “pulot,” so that Andres could not get hold of them for “sabong.”

    One day, around dusk, bandits were waiting for Kapitang Maria’s kalesa along her normal route home from the farm. When the kalesa reached them, the bandits stopped the kalesa, but there was no Kapitang Maria onboard, as the Souls in Purgatory had hidden Kapitang Maria from the sight of the bandits. When questioned, the kutsero denied having her on board and knowing where she was. Frustrated, the bandits allowed the kalesa to proceed to town.

  191. Enrique Bustos said,

    January 18, 2011 at 4:58 am

    According to a descendant of Alfonso Ongpin it was the son of Juan Luna. Andres Luna de San Pedro who authorize Alfonso Ongpin to sign some of the painting that was unsigned by his father because he believes that Alfonso Ongpin was an expert on his father’s Artworks.

  192. January 2, 2011 at 2:27 pm

    [...] The Families of Old Binan, Laguna February 2010 161 comments LikeBe the first to like this post. [...]

  193. January 2, 2011 at 4:41 am

    To Manuel Yatco Villanueva:

    Your fellow Binanenses await the family tree of Jose Yatco and Victoria Almeda.

    Kindly post it here in the Comments section.

    Thank you.

    Toto Gonzalez

    *********************

    manuel yatco villanueva said,

    March 22, 2010 at 2:41 pm

    hello Binanenses,
    i would like to share our family side of yatco-almeda clan,way back 1988 reunion,i will send our family tree and listing of all name from Jose Yatco-Victoria Almeda family tree.
    i have a sister in pennsylvania..myrna yatco villanueva
    thanks
    manning

  194. Fritz Co said,

    January 1, 2011 at 5:16 pm

    wow! :)

  195. Christopher Yatco said,

    December 14, 2010 at 3:56 am

    Hi Toto, when you visit the Pasig municipal government website, you will see the names of Don Pascual de Santa Ana and Don Antonio Molo Asuncion in the list of Pasig’s past mayors or gubernadorcillos. Don Pascual de Santa Ana , father of Remigia Santa Ana became a Gunernadorcillo in 1798 and in 1818 ,he acquired the hacienda de angono from the spaniards which gave him the title indio hacendero de angono.This explains why my relative claimed that Valentina Asuncion, wife of Enacio or Ignacio Yatco was from Pasig.

  196. Enrique Bustos said,

    December 6, 2010 at 4:34 am

    The Grand Father of of Ramon del Rosario Sr Antonio V. del Rosario was a former alcalde mayor of Laguna in 1872 he ordered the arrest of Dona Teodora Mercado the mother of Jose Rizal who was accused of aiding to an attempt of poisoning the wife of her half brother Don Jose Alberto a lieutenant guardia civil corroborated the wife’s accusation Antonio del Rosario ordered the arrest of Dona Teodora Mercado and made her walk 50 kilometers from Calamba to Sta Cruz where she was jailed for more than a year

    The incident left an indelible mark on Jose Rizal then 11 years old Jose Rizal saw the cruel treatment his mother endured as a betrayal of Antonio del Rosario and the lieutenant who both had been frequent guest at the Rizal home this incident fired up Jose Rizal writings in Noli Me Tangere he rendered a scene inflamed by his mother’s ordeal through the character of Sisa and a second character the the alcalde who ordered the arrest of Sisa was carved in the image of Antonio del Rosario
    but Antonio del Rosario the real person not the character redeemed himself in the end when the Real Audiencia acquitted Dona Teodora Mercado because as it turned out the lieutenant guardia civil gave a false testimony to get back at Don Francisco Mercado the husband of Dona Teodora because Don Francisco refused to give the guardia civil fodder for his horse Antonio del Rosario solicited the forgiveness of Dona Teodora upon her acquittal

    Jose Alberto descendant Zoilo Alberto was a two-time awardee as the “Most Outstanding Businessman of the Year” in recognition of his valuable and distinguished contribution to the economic development of Laguna, in particular, and of the Philippines, in general.

    He graduated from San Beda College with a Bachelor of Arts degree and subsequently obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Commerce from Jose Rizal College.

    Being a descendant of the Teodoro Alfonso-Rizal clan, Zoilo was an active civic leader in his hometown, Laguna.

    Since that historic day, he has become more involved with other business ventures and has been the president o Suyoc Consolidated Mining Co.; president, Filipino Flour Importer’s Assn.; president, Globe Wireless Ltd.; vice-president,Apayao Mining and Oil Co.;director, Philippine Chamber of Commerce; director, Palawan Consolidated Mining Co.; director, Hoechst-Marsman; director, Palawan Quicksilver Mines, Inc.; director, Republic Flour Mills; director, Fortune Insurance and Surety Co. Inc.; and director, Marsman and Company.

    Zoilo has four sons – Zoilo, Jr., Lorenzo, Luis Alberto, and Gerry

  197. Cesar Carino said,

    December 5, 2010 at 3:15 pm

    Hi! April, yes Larry, Jay and I are related. They say that all Carino’s from the old Binan were all related one way or another. It was also said that they were decendant of the Carino’s from the north, Mt. Province.

  198. April Benitez said,

    December 4, 2010 at 11:09 am

    To: Mr. Cesar Carino : Hi there! Im April Benitez from Silang Cavite. =) I would like to ask if you are related to Mr. Jay Cariño and Mr. Larry Cariño of Binan Laguna? My Dad, Manuel Benitez is the son of Herminia and Eusebio Benitez.. My Grandmother is the niece of the late General Cariño. Im so surprised as my dad told me we have relatives in Binan for I work at Brent International School.

  199. michael s. fabella said,

    November 21, 2010 at 3:28 am

    Good morning,Tanong lng po my kilala kayong DOLORES POTENCIANO dyan Binan Laguna di kna po matandaan ang middle name nya pero chinese po kc.. thanks!

  200. michael s. fabella said,

    November 20, 2010 at 5:00 pm

    hi po kc po ang lola ko haft chinese potenciano din po apelyedo taga binan laguna din po asawa nya ay si gerardo fabella taga or,mindoro pero tubong romblon po,my mga cousin po ako jan at kapatid ng lola ko lola paring..pasinsya na..tnx

  201. Cesar Carino said,

    November 12, 2010 at 10:13 pm

    This will change the picture.

    I have the record that shows SIMONA YAPTINCHAY as the daughter of Yap Tin Chay (or Pablo Yaptinchay as he was known in church records) and Maria Carillo-Tinidad. Simona Yaptinchay was married to MIGUEL DIMAS YATCO (1847) in Binan. Miguel’s parents were, (hard to read but I assume they were), Marcos Dimas Yatco and Maria Juana Gomes. Miguel was Binan’s Captain (Alkalde) 1863-64. I still have the names of their children to be; Petrona, Fermin (married to Petronila Carrillo-Trinidad), Pasquala (married to Lazaro Velasco), Teodora Angela (married to Jacinto Alzona), and Maria. I have the record of Fermin and Angela that confirmed their parent’s link. As for Aniceto Yatco, I have not found his name in the records.

    I would now say Pablo Yaptinchay (Yap Tin Chay) and Maria Carrillo-Trinidad’s children were; Simona, married to Miguel Dimas Yatco, Alberto (also known as Crisberto in some church records), married to Macaria Gana, and Isabel, married to Pedro Guico, son of Luis Guico and Josefa Basedilla. Pedro’s brother’s were: Florentino, married to Miguela Carrillo, Fernando, married to Agapita Carrillo.

    On the Potenciano line that Michael shared with us on entry no. 74; FLORENTINA POTENCIANO, wife of EULALIO GANA, is the daughter of Jose Potenciano and Micaela Arevallo. She must be the eldest since she got married (1848) before Mariano and Ceferina Gana (1851). I also found that FLORENCIO POTENCIANO was the son of Roman Potenciano and Valeriana Crisologo. Florencio’s first wife was, FILOMENA GUICO, the second marriage after Filomena passed away was, LORENZA ALMARINEZ. Florencio also has (said to be) a third marriage to ________ Paular, from which decended the Carrillo’s of Carmona, Cavite.

    That’s all for now. Thanks.

  202. Cesar Carino said,

    November 8, 2010 at 2:21 am

    Christopher,
    Here is an update, record shows that FERMIN YATCO, husband of Petronila Carrillo-Trinidad y Assuncion, is actually the son of Miguel Yatco and Simona Yaptinchay.

  203. Cesar Carino said,

    October 25, 2010 at 10:45 pm

    Christopher,
    Thanks a lot. Glad to know that your Tito Cezar is doing the research. I have some Yatco names in my file. One thing I’ve learned in genealogy work is the importance of sharing. That’s where I found most needed names, from feedbacks on information shared. You may go to, https://beta.familysearch.org, it has the Philippines Civil Records available online, provided by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, its very user friendly.

  204. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 25, 2010 at 12:07 am

    Hi Cesar, this blog is really a gold mine of information. I had a pleasant chat with Tito Cezar Yatco who is the organizer of the Yatco reunion the other day . I was surprised to learn that he was unaware of our connection to Ming Mong LO and Mariano Kagalitan so I informed him about this blog. Tito Cezar mentioned that the Yatcos are not really from Binan but from Manila. He got this information from the owner of Yatcos department store in Escolta. I’ll ask him about Miguel Yatco and Simona since he’s the one doing the research about our clan.

  205. Cesar Carino said,

    October 23, 2010 at 4:49 pm

    Christopher,

    Thanks for the info on your 119 post and for all your other postings. I’ve been looking at some Binan baptimal records in the late 1800 and have found the name, MIGUEL YATCO husband of SIMONA YAPTINCHAY, their daughter is Angela Yatco married to Jacinto Alzona. Just wondering if you have this names in your Yatco family tree. I know that it was said that Simeona Yaptinchay and Aniceto Yatco also have a daughter also named Angela Yatco. I just wondered if Simona is actually Simeona? Who is Miguel Yatco?

    Before I end, Let me share the latest on my end, YAP TIN CHAY, the young boy from China (father of Simeona, Alberto, and Isabel), used the name PABLO as his given name. Pablo must be the name chosen or given when he became Catholic. On an 1882 Binan baptismal record of FAUSTINO GUICO, the parents were listed as Pedro Guico and Isabel Yaptinchay; grandparents on the mother side were listed as: PABLO YAPTINCHAY and Maria Carrillo; on the father side the grandparents were listed as Luis Guico and Josefa Bacedilla.

    Toto your blog has become one of my favorite (lots of information). Tito Lito saw you in facebook, still “tandang pogi” looking good.

    Cesar

  206. October 23, 2010 at 8:00 am

    luckily, they were staying at another part of the resort

  207. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 23, 2010 at 6:25 am

    Hi Tito Lito ,thanks for having lunch at Crisostomo. You signed your name as tandang guapo at our feedback form. You should have texted me that you’ll be going so i could have gone there earlier to meet you. My staff said that you were funny and they even asked me if you are a priest. I don’t know what’s wrong with my staff ,they have poor discernment.Heehee!

  208. October 23, 2010 at 4:34 am

    Tito Lito:

    OMG. They were there? Were they hauled off to Basilan too?

    Yes, I know your cousin and his wife. I met them through the Singians and the Lazatins. Wonderful people!

    Toto G.

  209. October 23, 2010 at 1:05 am

    hello toto. An aside on the revillas, did you know that tita eli yan and her family were at dos palmas resort during the *bu say*af kidnapping? On the “pogi obsession” hindi naman lahat ng taga binan. ako lang at si chris. siguro to compensate for our inferiorities. my only first cousin on my father side, is a lazatin from san fernando. grandson of dr. gregorio singian and son of dr. cristino lazatin. leo lazatin married cherie pie villongco.
    Chris, had lunch at crisostomo friday to convince you na bihira ako magpunta sa sta rosa.

  210. October 22, 2010 at 4:22 pm

    Tita Lucy:

    The world is too small!!!

    I thought Fiel R. “friended” me because you told him… :)

    As for “Ache Salie” Rosalie Guanzon Henson-Naguiat, she is, first of all, a great friend. She’s also my cousin through the Henson line [ as well as the de Miranda, de Jesus, Paras, and David lines ]; we have common ancestors. Her husband “Cong Serge” Sergio Feliciano Naguiat is my cousin through the Valdes and Feliciano lines. Ache Salie leads Assumption alumnae friends in raising funds for the A-MRMF Assumption-Mother Rosa Memorial Foundation which helps support the Assumpta Technical School in San Simon, Pampanga. :)

  211. October 22, 2010 at 3:32 pm

    Christopher:

    I still feel too young [ at an "old 43" ] to be called “Tito Toto” but many younger friends already do, so I guess I had better be resigned to it. :P

    I like the way you Binan guys have a fixation for the term “pogi.” Very interesting!

    Now, regarding paintings by Juan Luna, I remember discussions among art experts and bigtime collectors at Ramon Villegas’ shop at the LaO’ Center… It turns out that Juan Luna did not sign several of his paintings [ was it that Ilocano alpha male ego or what? ]; that it was actually the art collector Alfonso Ongpin who identified them and signed them as “LVNA” in the prewar.

    Probably because of Binan, Laguna’s enviable economic prosperity from the early 1800s onwards, the “bahay-na-bato” mansions of its leading families contained a considerable number of oil portraits, usually life-size. In the “sala” of the Yaptinchay-Yatco residence hung the life-size, full figure, seated portraits of Ysidro Yatco and his wife Bonifacia Mercado y Alejandra [ elder sister of Francisco Engracio Mercado y Alejandra, father of the national hero Jose Protacio Mercado-Rizal y Alonso-Realonda ], parents of the “Tres Marias de Yatco” — Salud Yatco de Perlas, Leonila Yatco de Yaptinchay, and Paz Yatco de Ocampo.

    Many Binanenses remember that pair of ancestors in the Alberto residence. The signature “Juan Luna Y Novicio” was suspect; Miss Pilar Alberto was probably right when she said that they were painted by “a disciple of Juan Luna” [ "wannabe" in today's jargon ].

    A luxurious “objet” that appeared in the jewelry collections of Binan’s aristocratic ladies in the 1800s were exquisite, miniature oil paintings of “santos” on ivory pendants, generally attributable to the early “miniaturismo” artists like Damian Domingo, Justiniano Asuncion, and Simon Flores. As such, they are extremely rare. Historian and jeweler Ramon Villegas has patiently collected these masterpieces through the course of 30 years, usually finding them around the Binan-Santa Rosa-Cabuyao axis.

    Toto Gonzalez

  212. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 22, 2010 at 2:44 am

    Hi Toto (may I call you Tito Toto) , since Tito Lito is “tandang pogi” , you may call me “batang pogi” . I remember seeing two oil life size portraits of the Alberto ancestors by Juan Luna when I visited Ms Pilar Alberto for my school project 20yrs ago. When i asked her about the paintings, she claimed that those paintings were done by a disciple of Juan Luna . But at close inspection , i saw the signature Juan Luna Y Novicio at the bottom right corner of the paintings. I wonder what happened to those paintings.

  213. Lucy Francisco Borromeo said,

    October 21, 2010 at 3:51 pm

    toto, it seems we have a lot of links! aside from my papa and your mama being step-siblings, i noticed my cousin Fiel Resurreccion is also your FB contact. His father is the older brother of my dad. Now salie henson.. what a small world :)

  214. October 21, 2010 at 6:03 am

    Christopher:

    Yes, 400 hectares in Carmona, Cavite are worth Php billions today!

    Yes, an “unfavorable” government can really affect the fortunes of rich families. That is why the Chinese taipan families and the remaining multibillion Spanish and Filipino families do everything to ensure their stranglehold on the government, especially the politicians. I don’t blame them. One wrong signature and they can lose everything they have.

    At least the Binan families were able to sell their lands in Santa Rosa. We in Pampanga and Nueva Ecija — we were part of the “first volley” in 1972 — were just dispossessed, period. No talk of compensation or retention, nada. Good thing there were other investments all over.

    Toto Gonzalez

  215. October 21, 2010 at 5:50 am

    Tita Lucy:

    Yes, let’s get together with Tito Lito & Co.! When you’re here in Manila, of course. :)

    Toto Gonzalez

  216. October 21, 2010 at 5:44 am

    Tito Lito:

    Hahahah! How I wish! I am NOT young and carefree. I am 43 years old and the portents of old age are starting to creep in like uric acid, triglycerides, hypertension and all the other “perks.” :P

    My email addy is augustomrgonzaleziii@yahoo.com . I created it many years ago when I didn’t know that one could make a short email addy like nuttytoto@yahoo.com . DUH. :P

    Let’s talk here in the Comments section so we can add to “the Families of Old Binan, Laguna” thread. However, since I agree with you that it’s already long and quite a scroll down, you can email me and I will post it and reply here. I am sure you can share much more about the Old Binan you knew so well. It is certainly an honor to have Mr. Rafael Gana Hocson here in the blog. :)

  217. October 21, 2010 at 5:26 am

    Tito Lito:

    Oh, they are family friends: it’s “Tito Tito” — Ernesto Revilla Lagdameo — whom I call “tito”; he was a classmate of my late father at the De La Salle College. He married “Tita Rory” — Aurora Murphy Cojuangco — sister of “Danding” — Eduardo Murphy Cojuangco Jr. — he was a good friend of my father’s younger brother, Tito Melo, during their De La Salle and UP College of Agriculture days. Tita Rory’s mother “Dona Josephine” — Josephine Murphy-Cojuangco — was a good friend of my paternal grandmother, “Lola Charing” — Rosario Arnedo-Gonzalez. Also, through Opus Dei, Tita Rory and Tito Tito are good friends of my Tita Martha Reyes-Horrigan, younger sister of my late mother. :)

    Tito Lito, Tita Lucy is young and barely in her 60s [ she was a classmate at the Assumption Convent of a good friend and Henson and Valdes cousin of mine, Rosalie "Salie" Henson-Naguiat ]. You couldn’t possibly be much older than she is, so you’re young as well. :)

  218. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 21, 2010 at 4:32 am

    Hi Toto , the Yaptinchays owned 400 hectares of land in Carmona Cavite (must be worth billions today) but lost it through expropriation in the 1960s. Similar fate happened to other Binan families. Changes in the government can really affect the wealth of families. Most of the properties in Santa Rosa were owned by Binan families but most of them were compelled to sell because of the government’s land reform program.

  219. Lucy Francisco Borromeo said,

    October 20, 2010 at 7:37 pm

    Toto, would love to join you when you meet up with my Kuya Lito:) I can bring my paternal cousin Irene too!

  220. October 20, 2010 at 1:01 pm

    And thanks. Tina E., it is. Ah to be young and carefree!! Do you have an email or would you rather we converse here? Haba na ng blog.

  221. October 20, 2010 at 12:58 pm

    Kay. Tito lito then. But I noticed you call the Lagdameos “tito” in Families of Old Sta Cruz. Tito, Rickit, Maritess, Tonette, Nina, Marie, are second cousins of my wife. Also, Tita Pilaring says she would always ask my dad to accompany her on her dates when they were young. But yes it is always prudent to reserve judgement. Till we meet, then. “Lola” Uchay is still in US for her grandkids. But to give you an idea, I am the eldest among our generation and the gap between lola lucy’s and my age is rather wide.

  222. October 20, 2010 at 12:05 pm

    Rafael:

    I’ll call you “Tito Lito” for now, like your younger relatives. I’ll reserve “Tandang Pogi” when we meet in person, probably with “Lola Uchay”!!! :D

  223. October 20, 2010 at 6:04 am

    toto, you may call me whatever you wish. “a rose…”. many though, call me tandang pogi.

  224. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 19, 2010 at 4:21 pm

    There were many speculations concerning Teddy’s mysterious disappearance. Until now nobody knows what really happened to him. Like his mom, teddy was a character. He was notorious for his violent tendencies. People were afraid of him but it was his mom who feared him most.

  225. October 19, 2010 at 11:04 am

    Rafael [ or may I call you "Tito Lito"? ]:

    Teddy’s sister is Tina. According to her first cousins, she is married to an Australian and she has a wonderful life there.

    Toto Gonzalez

  226. October 19, 2010 at 7:43 am

    whenever teddy was in a rage, tia flory would send for naning lopez de leon (who was their neighbor) to calm teddy down. teddy looked at naning as an elder brother. i remember teddy had a sister, but the name escapes me now.

  227. October 19, 2010 at 5:17 am

    Christopher:

    True. The Manila Hotel in the early 1980s, through Roman Cruz and Barbara Gonzalez, were offered and sold antiques from the Yaptinchay-Yatco residence by a broker [ a certain "Mrs. B." ]. Teodoro “Teddy” Yaptinchay Evangelista Jr. had sold everything in a fit of rage against his mother Flora “Flory.” The pair of “Cristal Baccarat” chandeliers in the “sala” and the brass Victorian chandelier in the “caida” entrance hall were hung in the MacArthur suite. Some furniture pieces also found their way to the same hotel suite. The chandeliers and the antique furniture have since been moved to storage by the new, current owner of the Manila Hotel, Emilio Yap, because they do not suit his tastes.

    The owner, Flora “Flory” Yatco Yaptinchay-Evangelista, kept a stash of photographs of the individual contents of the house, the backsides of which detailed, in her own hand, which antique piece was sold by who to whom. Sad. One of the photographs showed the large grooved marble-topped table with C-scroll legs in the “sala,” the backside of which read: “sold to Mr. Geronimo de los Reyes by Mrs. Barredo.” Those photographs are now in the personal collection of Jose Ma. Ricardo “Joey” Yaptinchay-Abad Panlilio at the “Museo de La Salle” in Dasmarinas, Cavite.

    There is an unforgettable story related by Marcos regime officers of the IA Intramuros Administration: In the early 1980s, a “chinitang matrona” an almond-eyed society matron, attended by her two maids in white uniforms, appeared morose at the IA offices with photographs of her “stolen ivory santos” and she also bore a letter of accommodation “from above.” She requested, then demanded, to be shown the storeroom of ivory “santos” to see if her missing ones were there. The IA officers could not refuse her because of the letter “from above.” When she finally saw her missing “santos,” she fell on her knees and cried out: “Huhuhu!!! San Vicente Ferrer!!! San Antonio de Padua!!! Ano’ng ginawa nila sa inyo? Huhuhu!!!” She was in hysterics for many minutes before she finally comported herself. Sniffling, she declared: “Kakausapin ko si Meldy! Makikita ninyo! Kakausapin ko si Meldy!” [ meaning Madame Imelda Romualdez-Marcos ] I have long wondered: Could the “chinitang matrona” have been… ???

    Toto Gonzalez

  228. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 18, 2010 at 3:53 am

    Hi Toto , I heard that Manila hotel acquired a chandelier and a dining table which came from the Yaptinchay Yatco house when it was sold in the 1980s . There was also a story about jars filled with gold coins found during its demolition.

  229. maria relova said,

    October 17, 2010 at 4:07 pm

    By the way, I am a descendant of Juancho Asuncion Bartolome whose first wife is Rosario Villarica Oca, second wife—Antonia Agra Rivera.

  230. maria relova said,

    October 17, 2010 at 3:58 pm

    Hi Rafael,

    Sad to say I didnot grow up in Pila but trying to catch up for the lost opportunity. The houses around the Pila town plaza has been perfectly restored and kept for the next generations to appreciate. The town of Pila was also granted the status of Villa during the Spanish Colonial Period. The town was then called La Noble Villa de Pila in 1610. (In more than three centuries of Spanish occupation, only eight cities and towns were given the title of Villa. These are the La Villa del Santisimo Nombre de Jesus de Cebu in 1565, La Villa de Santiago de Libon (Albay, 1573), La Villa Fernandina de Vigan (Ilocos, 1574), La Villa Rica de Arevalo (Iloilo, 1581), La Noble Villa de Pila (Laguna, 1610), La Muy Noble Villa de Tayabas, (Tayabas, 1703), La Villa de Bacolor (Pampanga, 1765), La Villa de Lipa (Batangas, 1887)).

    It is also interesting to note that the first Philippine dictionary was printed in Pila, and it is still housed in one of the museums there. And in May 17, 2000, the National Historical Institute declared the Pila Town Plaza and the ancestral houses surrounding it as a National Historical Landmark.

    Cora is a cousin who is active in Pila Historical Society Foundation, Inc.

    To get a feel and visualize Pila, may I suggest the following:

    1). http://blog.bayangpinagpala.org

    2). http://www.flickr.com/photos/sanantoniodepadua/sets

  231. Sonny Rayos said,

    October 16, 2010 at 6:11 pm

    All,
    Thank everyone for contributing to our understanding of the Asuncion family of artists. With your postings we truly have expanded our Asuncion genealogy. I never imagined that my original posting (Comment No. 53 and 55 in The Families of Old Binan, thereafter copied by Toto Gonzales as Comment No. 10 in The Families of Old Sta. Cruz and published in its entirety in Jun Asuncion’s Bulan Observer) would generate so much interest … opening and answering missing links (and debunking misinformation) in their, as well as mine, yours and our family trees. Who could have thought? One thing for certain, this would make a very, very interesting (and expanded) Asuncion family reunion when this happens next year.

    Jess Vera Cruz – thank you for your post, I’ll send you the Asuncion family tree as soon as I get your email from Toto (big THANKS Toto). Maria Relova, thanks for that information … the Asuncion family I have does not have any information regarding Canuta Molo Asuncion other than she was married to Zalvidea Revilla. The author/originator of this family tree may have transposed the names … thanks for clarifying the surname. Do you have an expanded family tree of Canuta and Revilla besides the 13 sibling you named? Am also interested in getting your email from Toto (big THANKS Toto). Acknowledging too the contributions of Noni Agulto, Christopher Yatco, Esperanza Alzona, Manuel Villanueva, Cora Relova, Dr. Luciano Santiago, Jun and Alan Asuncion, Mickey and Jean Paterno and of course Toto.

    As an FYI, the Asuncion family tree is also available online … Loreto “Lou” Relova-Pascual started this family tree back in 2007, please contact her at: http://www.geni.com/people/Loreto-Lou-Relova-Pascual/1348866. For example, go to Google and do a search on “Canuta Asuncion” this will open “Canuta de la Paz Molo Asuncion” and click the link: “www.geni.com …”

    The artistic Asuncions live on … please follow these links: http://www.shepherd.edu/musicweb/esperanza_alzona.html and

    http://www.bonacoeli-guerzon.com/bio.html.

    Can someone tell me which trunk of the Asuncion family tree is Victor Santiago Asuncion? His website is: http://www.victorasuncion.com/about/

    Take care y’all.
    Sonny

  232. October 16, 2010 at 1:34 am

    maria, you should start a blog on pila, among the older towns of laguna. i remember cora relova attending our parties. i also remember her adobong kanduro (agachonas/snipes).

  233. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 15, 2010 at 5:50 pm

    Tito Lito, I hope you and your wife liked the food at Sweet Pea. We’ll be launching the new menu next week so please do drop by. Bernadette is my first cousin but I haven’t seen her for a long time because she no longer lives in Binan.Nonie ,I’ll be glad to meet up with you and Tito Lito. Let’s meet nxt week.

  234. Maria Relova said,

    October 14, 2010 at 4:21 pm

    There was a previous entry on canuta molo asuncion being married to a zalvidea revilla. My family tree shows zalvidea being the last name of the husband of canuta. Their children were Maria Antonia (married to Celso Lobregat),Quintin (married to Macaria Guevara), Sofronio,Melecio, Felix (Irene Navarro), Sergia (Felix Moya), Eduviguis, Buenaventura (Gregoria Severino), Ambrocia (Juan Domingo), Florencia (Florencio Oliva), Vicenta, Juana, and Pantaleon. 13 children all in all.

  235. October 14, 2010 at 11:24 am

    small world cris. it was your cousin, bernadette concepcion-zamora who bought our condo unit at magallanes. my wife reminded me it was at your sweet peas outlet at venicia mall.

  236. October 14, 2010 at 9:09 am

    cris, i do have lunch at paseo once in a while; last time it was at kingbee. my wife is a fan of chef florabel. we ate at an outlet last week at venicia mall at the fort. yes i am familiar with nuvali, not only because these are yulo sugar lands but also because a friend and cousin used to head ayala land.

  237. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 14, 2010 at 7:31 am

    Hi, Ysidro Yatco’s father was Gregorio Yatco. Gregorio Yatco had 4 brothers and their names were Ignacio Yatco ( married to Valentina Asuncion ), Aniceto Yatco ( married to Simeona Yaptinchay), Jose Yatco ( who started the Yatco clan in Batangas ), and Manuel Yatco.

  238. Noni Agulto said,

    October 12, 2010 at 5:03 am

    Thanks for the invite Christopher. Would love to join you guys one time.

  239. Jess Vera Cruz said,

    October 7, 2010 at 12:50 am

    To Sonny Rayos,

    I am very much interested in the Asuncion family tree that you mentioned in your post #53, please. Thank you!

  240. Jess Vera Cruz said,

    October 6, 2010 at 11:59 pm

    Hi! Just want to share this link, information on the descendants of Joaquin, son of Romana Asuncion and Andres Carrillo Trinidad. I am one of these descendants. They or rather we settled in Kalilayan (now Unisan), Tayabas (now Quezon):

    http://geociti.es/Heartland/Pointe/2284/carrillo/index.html

  241. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 5, 2010 at 3:08 pm

    Tito Lito (hehehe), I believe that it’s been a long time since you visited that area. The restaurant’s name is Crisostomo and it’s located in Nuvali Santa Rosa. Nuvali is the latest residential and commercial development of Ayala Land encompassing approximately 1200 hectares of land from Santa Rosa to Canlubang. We serve authentic filipino cuisine and all the recipes came from my wife, Chef Florabel Co.

  242. October 5, 2010 at 3:04 am

    cris – i used to be called mr pogi. now i am known as tandang pogi. lola lucy would complain if am called tito since she is much younger than i am; she claims i used to take advantage of her age, and cheat her at mahjong during the summer months we spent at lolo menong’s house. is your resto at paseo sta rosa, kaningclub? i used to be presidentof two companies at Technopark in the mid 90’s early 2000’s. when the only restos were pancake house, daruma and another small jap resto. jerry yatco’s resto at pulo sta cruz came later. noni, cesar , etc do drop by. we can trade stories and be the core of tracing binan’s past.

  243. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 3, 2010 at 1:51 pm

    That’s great . Can i now call u Tito Lito coz i believe we are somehow related by blood or by affinity. We can probably have lunch or merienda at my resto in Nuvali Santa Rosa. I’ll call Pet.

  244. October 2, 2010 at 12:10 am

    cris yes, by all means. just inform me a few days in advance. pet often comes by either for a light lunch, merienda, a few drinks.

  245. Christopher Yatco said,

    October 1, 2010 at 4:23 am

    Mr.Hocson, I’ll ask Pet if he can invite you to join us for coffee so we can talk about Binan and its history. Most of the information i know i got from this blog and maybe you can share with us more about Binan’s history and its families. Noni, it will be great if you can join us too.

  246. September 30, 2010 at 2:30 pm

    andy is a first cousin of my father, as my grandmother is a francia-hocson. i know digna and momoy.

  247. noni agulto said,

    September 30, 2010 at 10:09 am

    wow…past the one hundred replies mark….=)

  248. Christopher Yatco said,

    September 30, 2010 at 5:09 am

    Mr. Hocson, my aunt tita Josie is married to Andy Francia whose clan originated in pagsanjan. Are you and tito Andy related?

  249. September 30, 2010 at 2:47 am

    cesar, email me when you get back so we can get together.
    I no longer go to binan everyday; so send me word so I can make it a point to see you.

  250. Cesar Carino said,

    September 25, 2010 at 6:19 pm

    Mr. Hocson (Tito Lito), I would love to sit with you and look at the Leonie Yatco’s family tree, I will make it a point to meet you next time Im home. Right now I am here in Toledo, Ohio. I would also love to visit with your group at that place in Tulay Bato.

  251. Christopher Yatco said,

    September 25, 2010 at 2:09 pm

    Antonio Asuncion became a political figure in Pasig because of his marriage to Remigia Sta. Ana. Their daughter Valentina Asuncion married Ignacio Yatco of Binan, Laguna. Eleuterio Yatco, one of their sons, is my great grandfather.

  252. Charles Aznable said,

    September 24, 2010 at 3:19 am

    Very Interesting topic from the old Biñan. Gives me drive to know more about my relatives from my father’s side. My grandfather is Dr. Roman Mercado from San Jose Biñan. I would very much appreciate it If anyone from here can provide records of him or his roots. I left Biñan in the mid-90’s and now reside in Bacoor Cavite with my wife who came from a known family named Agulto.

    Laki na ng pinagbago ng Biñan the last time i visited…

    Thanks
    Charles

  253. September 23, 2010 at 6:49 pm

    cesar, the info you are looking for may be in tito leonie’s family tree, as the gaspar line is included. there are several copies around, but i have one we can go over. my copy is at binan rural bank; tell me when you are available. the posting on the gana is of filomeno and susana munoz toribio of meycauyan. the gana ocampo siblings were vicente (beatriz chuidian), Maria (lola angge); and filomeno (susana toribio)
    noni – used to be uchay; my sign of endearment. her lola lucia was a famed piano teacher in manila before WWII. i claim privelege of primo genitor in calling her lola uchay. stories on the courting of her mom and several suitors, i will keep to my self. pet yaptinchay tells me umuuwi ka sa binan afternoon/evening. drop me a line when we can get together, i’ll bring some old fogies (my contemporaries, even older) you can pick brains. binan should have a blog that should rival pagsanjan’s.

  254. Cesar Carino said,

    September 23, 2010 at 3:15 pm

    Great posting on the the Gana-Ocampo line. Thanks for shatring, Noni and Tita Lucy. Mr. Hocson thanks for the insights, it helps put things in perspective.

    Most of the records I found shows that Macaria, Ceferina and Francisca used Reyes as their middle name. This may mean that Gaspar Gana’s wife’s family name is Reyes. Still looking for her given name.

    Thanks!!!

    Cesar

  255. September 23, 2010 at 9:58 am

    Tita Lucy and Noni:

    Thank you for the information about the Gana – Ocampo line. We will integrate it into the main blog post as soon as we can. :)

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  256. Lucy Francisco Borromeo said,

    September 22, 2010 at 1:44 pm

    LOL thanks toto! Lola Uchay is actually lucia almeda-francisco, my papa’s adoptive mother who i was named after,, the nickname stuck, compliments of dear Kuya Lito:) hope you got emails re our grandparents.

  257. September 22, 2010 at 9:07 am

    Noni:

    Why does everyone call Tita Lucy Francisco Borromeo “Lola Uchay” when she is not even old? :)

    She’s not even 70 yet and she’s barely 60. :P

    Cheers!!!

    Toto G.

  258. September 21, 2010 at 2:13 pm

    lola, finding it difficult to communicate at fb and to keep privacy. got to this blog actually for my wife in “families of old sta cruz manila”. i also came across another blog (gudam, i think) on the insensitiveness of binanenses because gerry’s selling tita pilaring/tito zoilo’s house. lola abe would turn in her grave. do you know that gerry stated in court that he is the only heir of vicente and filomeno gana? anyway, as part of the “insensitiveness” of binan, the blogger pointed to a pile of lumber at the backyard of cobeng gonzales’ house and claimed it was the remains of rizal’s school house??!! told him that it was lolo memong who sold that house to cobeng in the ’50s; and there was just a bahaybahayan there that we used in play in, instead of rizal’s schoolhouse. that prior to the sale the house was used as a hospital by dr and dra rosing francisco.

  259. Noni Agulto said,

    September 21, 2010 at 6:22 am

    Hi Toto!

    Lola Uchay here is very generous with information that she’s willing to share entries of the more contemporary members of the Gana Family.

    As she mentioned in her email to me:

    Gana – Ocampo Line

    Filomeno O. GANA married Susana TORIBIO
    Vicente O. Gana married Betty Chuidian
    (Lola Angge) Maria O. Gana died a spinster in 1944/1945.

    Gana – Toribio Line:

    Amparo Gana-Dionisio Hocson
    vicente
    rafael – teresing reyes
    teresita – jose jalandoni
    susana – farley ampil
    tomas – dory (family name ?)
    carmen
    dionisio jr- amor (family name ?)
    regina (sideris)
    filomeno – evelyn afzelius
    feliza – mari manzano

    Rafaela Gana- Angel Yaptinchay
    rafael – melanie perez
    angela – jose tanjuatco
    cristina (lazaro)
    filomeno – margie roxas
    susana – tony narciso
    avelina- gerb ignacio

    Norberta Gana-Higino R Francisco
    lucia (borromeo) : tyrone-cecile ranada
    paolo-trina genuino
    vincent
    eduardo
    filomeno – carol poblete
    ramon – maryann singson
    federico – thelma melevo
    lourdes (gutierrez)
    benjamin – ruby manalac
    susana – francisco luna
    regina – jesus yap
    nora – cipriano cruz
    irene – mars marasigan

    Tomasa Gana- Nestor Yatco
    filomeno – katrina
    jose – beck canlas
    nestor
    angela – henry ong
    eduardo – beng lejano
    vic – iday (?)

    There you go!

    cheers

    noni

  260. Lucy Francisco Borromeo said,

    September 20, 2010 at 9:23 am

    Tolits! easier to communicate in FB….

    Noni, can you incorporate the info i passed on to you about the Toribio-Gana line? you can ask tito lito about the blanks :)

  261. Lucy Francisco Borromeo said,

    September 20, 2010 at 9:19 am

    Tolits! easier to communicate in FB.

  262. September 17, 2010 at 3:48 am

    lola uchay!- no choice; having difficulty moving around so, nothing to do but blog. how are the grandkids?

  263. Lucy Francisco Borromeo said,

    September 15, 2010 at 11:24 pm

    Hi Noni,

    Glad my Kuya Lito is in the blog! Hope we can all meet up one day with Toto G.there’s just so much to talk about :-)

    Tita Lucy

  264. Noni Agulto said,

    September 15, 2010 at 1:54 am

    Hi Vanessa!

    Von and Czarina were my bus mates in grade school during our Colegio San Agustin Makati days. Interesting, I always through there’s some sort of connection between the Tan Ganas and the Ganas because of that “namesake issue” of 2 persons from different generations.

    However, your cousin Garry (on his dad – Jun Jimenez’s side) is related to the Ganas since he descends from the line of Guido Gana Yaptinchay by his second “wife” Nicolas Garcia . =)

    Tito Lito,

    (if I may call you that, Tita Lucy told me that’s your nickname)
    That would be great! Have a lot of questions for you. Hope to catch up with you soon.

    Thanks

    noni

  265. September 14, 2010 at 7:12 am

    vanessa, i remember hearing the same story;about vicente tang gana. this was the furthest we can trace back probably late 1700s. i also remeber the story that the gana and the tan ganas were related; though it is likely the connection was im china and your ancestor was a relative convinced by vicente tang gana to immigrate. sonny tan gana was a few years younger than me but he used to come to the parties at our binan house when he was a teenager. we used to call each other “primo” this was in the 50’s,60’s
    yes noni, your uncle is resty agulto, he is manager of our san antonio branch. pet yaptinchay comes over to the bank once a week, usual monday just to relax, have coffee,camaraderie. because of my age i join them once in a while. marianing lopez de leon (he doen’t want to use his edralin middle name) also come for the drinks, and is the source of family histories someof which used to be kept hidden. come and join, usually monday mga 3 pm after bank office at teresa arcade, tulay bato

  266. Vanessa J. Tan Gana said,

    September 12, 2010 at 8:50 pm

    Hi, I’m Vanessa Tan Gana, a fourth generation member of the Tan Ganas originating from the lineage of Vicente Tan Gana. I was told was that he was born in China and came in the Philippines via the chinese junkboat. He settled in Binan in the 1800’s and married a filipina (my lola sa tuhod), Sergia Miranda.
    Based on the geneologies of “old families” in Binanstated above, there was a Vicente Tang-Gana who lived in the late 1700’s, a namesake (almost)of my great grandfather. But I doubt that the Tan Ganas of the present generation originated from that family because I was told (probably by my “lolo” Francisco M. Tan Gana) that our family surname was initially “Tan”. The “Gana” part was added only when a decree was given ( I don’t know who gave it, much less if it was true) for Chinese immigrants in the country to adapt or add the surname of the “ninong” that they chose or was chosen for them once they become naturalized citizens of our country.
    The family tree of the present-day Tan Ganas, as far as I know, is as follows: Vicente Tan (Gana) married Sergia Miranda. They had children, one of which was my grandfather Francisco M. Tan Gana who married Remedios Arcega. They had 6 children, one of which was my father Vicente Tan Gana, Sr. who married my mother Emelita Jaojoco ( related to the Alberto and Ocampo clan via her father Mario Ocampo Jaojoco). They had 4 children, Vanessa, Vicente Tan Gana, Jr. (present city councilor), Von Francisco, and Valerieczarina.
    So in my mind, there really is no link(or is there?) between the Tang-Ganas/ Ganas of old Binan, and the Tan Ganas of today…….or can anybody suggest a way I can verify this? I’d appreciate it very much, thanks.

    Vanessa

  267. ROBERTO SALANDANAN CARIÑO said,

    September 8, 2010 at 11:31 am

    VERY INTERESTING.

  268. Noni Agulto said,

    September 8, 2010 at 9:41 am

    Hi Mr. Hocson!

    Great to hear from you here in Toto’s blog. I’ve been in touch with your cousin Lucy (she’s a big fan of social networking site and that’s where i bumped into her).

    I’ve also had the chance of meeting your other cousins Omy and Tina on separate occasions.

    I’d love to reproduce the paterno pamphlets for keepsake.

    Of course I’m quite familiar with the Hocsons having heard stories from lola and lolo about the children of Don Menong…and remember how i always look up to your ancestral house during good friday procession. =)

    An uncle (dad’s cousin) works in your bank. =)

    best

    noni

  269. September 5, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    lala, good to come across you again. the first and last time we touched base was when you were still working with mitsui or mitsubishi, and i at purefoods.(20-25 odd years ago?) i remember your granddad, don cua with his pipe. gen capinpin and don cua were among the old gang of your/my grandfather. their property is still intact across your old house. i ofen meet with you uncle, marianing.

    noni, i have a copy of pedro paterno’s viajes in the first district of laguna (from san pedro to pagdanjan, i think) to which you are welcome to. i keep it at the binan rural bank office in binan. unfortunately i lent another original edition to the secretary of one of our former mayors some twenty years ago. this edition was also about binan. apparently it got lost. sayang. i also have a copy of tito leony yatco’s genelogical chart if it would help..as you wouldhave guessed, i am the oldest among filomeno gana’s grandchildren.

  270. Michael Almendral said,

    September 5, 2010 at 11:49 am

    Please correct my comment on your website to read “…EDUARDO(Capitan 1886-87), father of Don MENONG, and JESUALDO(Capitan 1895-98), father of Don ENCHONG, and Dona LOLAY GANA-VALENCIA.” Thanks.

    As for the “strange beings” at the Cuartel, I hope they aren’t just some squatters trespassing on the property =)

    Mike

  271. Alberto Ocampo said,

    September 4, 2010 at 4:24 pm

    Thank you for all these information. I’m a descendant of Edilberto Ocampo. My grandparents are Isidro Ocampo, married to Francisca Tiongco of Santa Rosa. I’ll forward this link to my Dad; I’ve heard stories from him regarding our ancestry but in bits and pieces. The information herein and reading all the blogs really gave me light on where I came from. Fascinating and interesting.

  272. Cesar Carino said,

    September 1, 2010 at 9:04 pm

    Hi!, some typo error on my last entry. What I mean to say is Salud Yatco was listed as the daughter of YSIDRO YATCO and BONIFACIA MERCADO. Bonifacia is therefore a daughter (as was made known) of Juan Mercado and a sister of Don Francisco Engracio Rizal Mercado, father of Dr. Jose Rizal. The story says that Juan Mercado and Cirila Alejandra has 13 children, Francisco being the youngest.

    Thanks.

  273. Cesar Carino said,

    September 1, 2010 at 7:08 pm

    Hello Toto,

    Found the time to look again at a film of Binan church marriage documenst at the Family History Center, and I found some names on my side of the family.

    As I was searching I was hoping also to find an information that would link the YAPTINCHAY, YATCO, MERCADO to the national hero JOSE RIZAL. It was made known that PABLO YAPTINCHAY’s wife LEONILA MERCADO YATCO was first cousin to the hero. Leonila has 2 other sisters Salud Yatco and Paz Yatco.

    This is what I found; on 23 August 1891 EDILBERTO de OCAMPO married MARIA (PAZ) YATCO in Binan, Laguna. Paz Yatco was listed at Maria on the record. Edilberto was listed as the son of GIL de OCAMPO and the mother iwas MAGDALENA AREVALO. Paz’ father was listed at YSIDRO YATCO married to BONIFACIA MERCADO. If what was made known was true, Bonifacia, therefore, was one of the sisters of Don FRANCISCO ENGRACIO RIZAL MERCADO, father of Jose Rizal, son of Don JUAN MERCADO.

    I also found that one their sister, MARIA SALUD YATCO married PABLO PERLAS on 28 June 1896 in Binan, Laguna. The Perlas’ were from Santa Rosa, Laguna. Pablo’s father was PEDRO PERLAS married to NATALIA TIONGCO. Salud was lied as the daughter of Ysidro Yatco and Bonifacia Mercado.

    This is the update that I wanted to share. Thanks.

  274. Willy Faustino said,

    August 22, 2010 at 10:51 am

    hi! i’m curious about Esteban Zarraga.
    My grandfather, Alfonso Faustino, told me that Esteban Zarraga was his grandfather.
    I just wanted to know some story about my great-great grandfather and his family in Binan, Laguna.
    tnx a lot!

  275. Sal Gonzalez said,

    August 21, 2010 at 9:48 am

    Toto Gonzalez,
    The first consciousness of my life happened in Binan, and I do reminisce of the Rizal monument, the “Bakya” of a town plaza where I rolled on one skate; the wonderous fireworks viewed from the Ocampos house or at Tia Nenas house and the Flores de Mayo. ..and the main May 15 fiesta. There also was the daily task of getting the Manila Times from Aling Ruth’s store then much later on, also getting my school supplies from her store. Now, I wish I can get in touch with my Santa Catalina classmates/ friends with last names like Almendral , Carino, Carillo, Galvez, Vasquez.
    BTW, how are you related to the Gonzalez’ ..namely Tia Tonia, Tia Unday, Tia Guia and Tio Tonying (Dr. Antonio Gonzalez of UST, father of Ate Manay and another sister who is also of UST medical staff, ). and their house had (a higher level garden) patio in the back that use to have such gorgeous roses…and across the street was the former Meralco office next to the PLDT.
    Our Gonzalez is from Santa Rosa; my grandfather’s statue (Basilio Gonzalez) used to be next to Rizals’ but it had been “repositioned” somewhere opposite the plaza.
    Thank you for your excellent entries here…and I look forward to hearing your reply.
    ps.
    If I remeber correctly, I had for first grade teacher, Miss Garcia, and a third grade or 4th (?) teacher named Miss Agulto. and Mother Cecilia as the Mother Superior then at Sta Catalina.

  276. Christopher Yatco said,

    August 11, 2010 at 1:57 pm

    Hi, now I know why my brother has an affinity for politics. It’s because of his blood relation to the Asuncion clan. As I’ve learned, the Asuncions not only excelled in the arts, some of them became politicians too. Thanks Toto for your informative blog. I’m really impressed with your knowledge about old Binan families.

  277. Noni Agulto said,

    August 2, 2010 at 5:41 am

    Hi Mike! Salamat and you finally came out with quite a statement. Who convinced you to suddenly come out? haha…definitely not me.

    Thanks for correcting, some info…ubaldo was a generation younger pala…i just heard the name from your mom, but i missed out that he was don conrado’s brother… not don pablo’s. =)

    Almeda, Ocampo and Gonzales families na lang ang walang entries.

    best

    noni

  278. Cesar Carino said,

    August 1, 2010 at 4:29 pm

    Here is a correction on my posting no 76. I found some time yesterday to look closely at the information I have (from the civil mariage registry records).

    It is not possible that FLORENCIO POTENCIANO is the son of PRIMO POTENCIANO as I was previously informed. Record shows that in 1918 Florencio and Lorenza’s eldest daughter (name withheld) was married in Carmona, Cavite. PRIMO POTENCIANO and GENEROSA VELASCO was married 1925 in Binan, Laguna. PRIMO is the son of ISIDRO POTENCIANO and SEVERA SISON. GENEROSA is the daughter of RESENDO VELASCO and JOSEFA CARILLO, daughter of PRIMO CARILLO SR. and ROSARIO (Rosa) GANA, daughter of JOSE GANA.

    Hi Lala! I enjoyed reading your post. It really tied up the whole thing. Thanks for shating. I could still see in my mind the picture of your family home in Capinpin street, as I passed by it on my bike as a young boy. It was warmly painted (off white more on light yellow side color) with a notary public sign outside. Your story also bings to mind the picture of Gen. Lopez de Leon’s picture as PMA cadet that we have back then. Him and my dad were high school friends. Here is an update, I was just looking at a film of Binan Church marriage records last Thursday night at the Family History Center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, here in Toledo, Ohio, and I found that DON MARIANO LOPEZ de LEON was married in Binan, on May 26, 1891 to ISIDRA POTENCIANO. I will stiil look at the records to see what more information I could find when I get the chance.

    Tolo, thanks for this website, that allows us to share and find a lot of information.

    Cesar

  279. Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon said,

    July 28, 2010 at 5:32 pm

    Hi Toto,

    I realized I haven’t thanked you properly for accommodating me in this blog, which I find truly fascinating. I read some of your other posts on other topics, and it’s just amazing to find such wealth of information and interesting stories.

    In just a few visits, I feel “at home” here now, so would you let me tell some stories?

    To Michael Almendral and Cesar Carino: Thank you both for your posts on the Potenciano and Lopez de Leon families. Allow me to put together those pieces on our family and add a bit more; quoted mostly from our “blue book”.

    The direct line to my own side runs this way: Don Cristobal (b. 1772, Palanyag) – Don Antero (b. 1796, Palanyag) – Don Pedro (presumably born in Palanyag, year of birth TBC) – Don Mariano (presumably born in Binan, year TBC) – Don Pascual (born in Binan, year TBC/most likely 1893) – Conrado (my father/born 1930 in Calapan, Mindoro Oriental but grew up in Binan).

    Don Mariano and Isidra Potenciano had 4 children, born in the ff. order: Eugenio, whom I remember to be fond of horses (I think he bred racehorses and he had “tiburin”); Pascual; Leonila, who married Eduardo Guico, a very handsome doctor; and, Carmen, a pharmacist.

    Don Pascual, my Lolo Cua, was an Abogado and he served the government in several posts (Public Defender for Laguna, Cebu, Bohol, and Pampanga; Chairman of the Board of Inquiry for Laguna in the early days of the Liberation Period; Labor Conciliator of the Philippines; etc.).

    He married Dona Laura Mariano, a “Critic Teacher” who hailed from Calapan, Mindoro Oriental. (*I was named after her and have the same nickname.) She was apparently offered a study grant to the US, but my grandfather had proposed marriage and when asked to choose between him and career, she chose him. (*One of many romantic stories.) They had 7 children: 6 boys and 1 girl, my father was the youngest. When my father was 3 years old, Lola Lala succumbed to complications from child-bearing.
    Lolo Cua later married Dona Toribia Edralin, a nurse who hailed from Sarat, Ilocos Norte. (*Yes, she was a close relative of Ferdinand Marcos’s mother. ) They had 4 children.

    The family moved a lot apparently because of my grandfather’s various provincial assignments, until World War II broke out. His second son Julio became a soldier, and a hero of Bataan Death March. His other elder boys joined the guerilla movement with other heroic boys of Binan and nearby towns. The younger boys just idolized their bold and brave elder brothers. Such boyish dreams though developed into genuine aspirations to join the men in uniform. Tito Cific, who’s two years older than my father, a PMA graduate Class of 1953, served the Armed Forces of the Philippines until February 25, 1986 (EDSA I as written in history) as Brigadier General. And, well, you know, the last commander-in-chief he served was Marcos. (That’s another story.)

    All through the years, of upheaval as well as bliss, the family always get drawn to the house on Calle Capinpin, where my charismatic grandfather Lolo Cua held fort. It’s quite different now without him, and without my father, but it’s still a strong link to our past.

    Thank you for listening.

  280. Cesar Carino said,

    July 27, 2010 at 7:07 pm

    Thanks Michael for posting no. 74, which is a great posting. It is now clear that Ubaldo Potenciano is a son of Pablo and not as a brother as previously known. Sharing of information is very imfortant in genealogy work and this site is doing just that. I have already noted and added the names you mentioned on my personal ancestral file and let me share with you some Potenciano information that I have.

    Referring to the AREVALLO-POTENCIANO Line, I have on my file the name LORENZA ALMARINEZ as married to FLORENCIO POTENCIANO, son of PRIMO POTENCIANO and GENEROSA VELASCO. Primo is the son of ISIDRO POTENCIANO and SEVERA SISON. Generosa is a granddaughter of Rosario Gana, daughter of Jose Gana. I am still looking for Lorenza Almarinez’ lineage.

    Thanks for the info that Mariano have a common law wife, based on the record that I found, their daughter Candida was married on Apr 12, 1914 to Gregorio Nuque, Candida’s father was listed as Mariano Potenciano and the mother is Cirila Bati. There is also a record of the marriage of their son Miguel to Toribia Guevara, mother of the groom also listed as Cirila Bati.

    Another info on Don PASQUAL LOPEZ DE LEON, he married LAURA MARIANO in 1921, She must be the first wife.

    Visit the newly oppened, fsbeta FamilySearch.org website of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They have posted worldwide historical genealogical records online, and is continually transcribing and updating these records. Luckily Philippines’ civil records, are now included, and is available. This is the address: http://fsbeta.familysearch.org/, You could now do most of your research online.

    Agani this is the site: http://fsbeta.familysearch.org/

    Thanks!!!

    Cesar

  281. July 26, 2010 at 8:57 am

    Michael:

    Thank you so much for that incredible piece of research!!! I have never come across such exhaustive information about the Potenciano de Binan. Our many history buffs will be thrilled.

    Many, many thanks for your generosity. I will upload the information to the blog post as soon as I can.

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  282. Michael Potenciano Almendral said,

    July 26, 2010 at 7:29 am

    Toto,

    Unfortunately, I don’t have a copy of the complete family tree commissioned for the Grand Reunion in 1981 so I had to start from scratch. This is an abbreviated genealogy(4 generations) based on entries in the surviving Libros de Bautismos, Casamientos, and Entierros kept in the Parroquia de San Isidro Labrador de Binan; the list of Capitanes from the municipal records; as well as family stories I heard while I was growing up. When I did my research more than 15 years ago, I only checked the baptismal records filed under POTENCIANO so I missed those records of children who descended from Potenciano daughters and were baptized with different surnames. I will have to do a reverse look up by reading each and every entry and going through the child’s parents and grandparents listed. I might find more names and, hopefully, uncover more links to other Binan families in the future. For now, here’s my small contribution to FAMILIES OF OLD BINAN as you requested.

    All the best,
    Michael

    A story an aunt remembers hearing from my grandfather was that the original family surname was ARAMBULO from the neighboring Dominican hacienda of San Pedro Tunasan. An unnamed ancestor had a quarrel with his father, moved to Binan and changed his surname to POTENCIANO. Unfortunately, I have no way of verifying if this story is true. What is certain is that by the 1800’s the Potencianos were already established enough in Binan that JOSE POTENCIANO, the earliest ancestor that can be found in the surviving parish records, became a Capitan in 1833, 1846, and 1847. His marriage to MICAELA AREVALO, daughter of JOSE AREVALO(Capitan 1833), produced the siblings MARIANO, DOMINGO, and ROMAN.

    The AREVALO-POTENCIANO Line
    ============================
    MARIANO(Capitan 1861) married CEFERINA REYES GANA, daughter of GASPAR GANA(Capitan 1830). Their children were PABLO, CANDIDO, FRANCISCO, ISIDRA, and SILVERIA. Mariano also had a common-law-wife, CIRILA CORVA, with whom he had ENGRACIO, CANDIDA, PASTOR, and MIGUEL all of whom were baptized with the POTENCIANO surname.

    *CEFERINA’s sister, MACARIA, married ALBERTO YAPTINCHAY establishing the link to the Yaptinchays.

    *CEFERINA’s paternal half-uncle EULALIO(Capitan 1850, 1867-68) , son of the GANA patriarch VICENTE TANG GANA by his second wife TOMASA, married FLORENTINA POTENCIANO and established the other POTENCIANO-GANA line from which descended EDUARDO(Capitan 1886-87), father of Don MENONG, Don ENCHONG, and Dona LOLAY GANA-VALENCIA; and JESUALDO(Capitan 1895-98). I still need to do further research to find out exactly how FLORENTINA is related to JOSE and MARIANO.

    DOMINGO married BRIGIDA MERCADO.

    ROMAN married VALERIANA CRISOLOGO and LORENZA ALMARINES.

    The GANA-POTENCIANO Line
    ========================
    PABLO(1858-1941, Capitan 1889) married FELIZA GARCIA(1859-1929), daughter of AGATON GARCIA(Capitan 1877-78) and MARIA SALOME ALMEDA CARLOS who also comes from a family with a long history of Capitanes. They had three sons, MARIANO, UBALDO, and CONRADO.

    The “Tres Caidas” which still goes out every Holy Wednesday was inherited by FELIZA from her GARCIA(pronounced gar-sha’) ancestors. The POTENCIANO ancestral home which stands to this day was built in the older transitional bahay na bato style. It is a very long house with a steeply hipped roof and sawali ceilings. Delicately carved rococo floral swags decorate the frieze above the windows. The original capiz were later changed to green and clear French panes. It was used as the headquarters of the Japanese Imperial Army who occupied the town during WWII and fundoshi-clad Japanese soldiers loved to take their baths in the covered swimming pool on the grounds. It also served as the elementary school for a short period after the war. Pablo died in Malate in 1941. That house on 111 Calle Remedios burned in 1945 and along with it the original Senor of the Tres Caidas.

    CANDIDO married RUFINA GANA. Their only child, Col. PELAGIO POTENCIANO, married MAXIMA BLOUSE daughter of MAX BLOUSE, founder of BTCo and LTBCo which eventually became BLTBCo.

    FRANCISCO POTENCIANO married GERARDA MARFORI

    ISIDRA POTENCIANO married MARIANO LOPEZ DE LEON. Their son, PASCUAL, remarried to TORIBIA EDRALIN(related to FM’s mother) of Sarrat, Ilocos Norte. The family owns the carroza of “La Muerte de San Jose”.

    SILVERIA POTENCIANO(1873-1940) married MARIANO BAYLON in 1914. The BAYLON ancestral home is one of the last few remaining bahay na bato’s in town. A cavernous bat infested camalig occupies almost half of the three-level house.The Baylons owned the original processional carroza of the Agony in the Garden.

    The GARCIA-POTENCIANO Line
    =========================
    MARIANO RICARDO(1882-1955), being the eldest son, was groomed to follow in Kapitan Ambo’s footsteps but the Americans came and changed the old political system. He and his family moved back to Binan around 1943 to escape the hardships of war in Manila. They were forced to live with the Japanese officers who took over the old Potenciano house. He and his family moved to the house beside the Yaptinchays on Capinpin Street, a few steps from the plaza, in the early 50’s.

    The second child, UBALDO(1885-1941), was a doctor who also headed the town’s “sanidad”. He and his son were killed by the Japanese in Tayabas. Only his daughter survived the war.

    The youngest, CONRADO(1888-1951), was a surgeon. He and his family settled in Santa Mesa on V.Mapa. He was elected into Congress in 1941. He owned FARMACIA POTENCIANO on Calle Solana in pre-war Intramuros. His son founded Polymedic General Hospital now VRPMC.

  283. Sonny Rayos said,

    July 23, 2010 at 6:22 am

    FYI, I just saw this announcement. Salcedo Auctions is auctioning off one of Justiniano Asuncion’s religious painting entitled Sor San Jose. Venue is this Saturday July 24, 2010 at Nash Room, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Makati Ave., Makati beginnng at 2:00 p.m. A small write up of Kapitan Ting and the provenance of the painting is included in the brochure. Please google search “Salcedo Auctions” to view the auction brochure.

  284. Noni Agulto said,

    July 20, 2010 at 10:55 am

    on cesar carino’s entry no 68… its nice when these bits of information come in and we slowly are able to put together the pieces… the couple miguela carrillo and florentino guico’s names are both reflected in the paterno pamphlet which would pretty much determine how rich this couple were at that time =) lovely!

  285. Noni Agulto said,

    July 20, 2010 at 10:42 am

    this is slowly getting more and more interesting….we love it as you keep them coming…glad you guys are discovering this site.

    cheers

    noni =)

  286. Cesar Carino said,

    July 18, 2010 at 4:06 am

    Hi Lala!

    I read your postings here and felt that your looking for info on your ancestry and that prompted me to share what I posted. Glad to know it help. I have already included the information you gave in my file. Gen. Pacifico Lopez de Leon is my godfather. My wife is related to most of the families mentioned here and we have been searching for our family ancestry for some time now.

    I stumble on this site accidentally and I’m glad I did. I was amazed on the information it contain. Hope it will continue.

    Cesar

  287. Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon said,

    July 17, 2010 at 4:07 pm

    Hi Cesar,
    I should like to personally thank you for adding this bit on the connection between the four families. This is valuable information for me.
    Don Mariano Lopez de Leon’s mother was Dona Maxima C. Trinidad y Gana. There really were inter-marriages between closely related families.

    Would you be related to any of the families mentioned?

    Lala

  288. Cesar Carino said,

    July 17, 2010 at 1:25 am

    Hello!
    I have been coming here to read the comment which are very very informative. I just feel today that I should share some information I have on the Lopez de Leon, Gana, Guico, Yaptinchay inter-family relationship.

    Ceferina Gana, daughter of Garpar Gana, married Mariano Potenciano, their children were, Pablo, Ubaldo (a name that I bound here in this site), Silveria, Candido, Isidra, and Francisco. Isidra Potenciano married Mariano Lopez de Leon and these are 3 of their children, Leonila, Eugenio, and Pasqual. Leonila married Eduardo Guico, son of Florentino Guico and Miguela Carillo. Florentino and Anastacio are sons of Pedro Guico and Isabel Yaptinchay a daughter of Yap Tin Chay and Maria Carillo Trinidad.

    Thats all for now. Hope this helps. Thanks and keep up the good work, Totol

    Cesar

  289. July 1, 2010 at 9:21 am

    Dear Readers:

    We apologize because we cannot accommodate requests for individual charities here. We have already been victimized several times by unscrupulous individuals who expertly pretended to be in dire need of financial assistance. Some readers from the USA actually sent $$$ funds only to discover upon investigation that they were false entities.

    Please bring your requests to the legitimate charitable organizations.

    Sincerely,

    Toto Gonzalez

  290. Noni Agulto said,

    June 29, 2010 at 4:03 am

    Toto… i was reading about the Lopez de Leon entries you made… I realized the ancestral house being described which lies along calle capinpin and across the house of general capinpin would be the house exactly beside the former Yaptinchay-Yatco house. =)

  291. Noni Agulto said,

    June 29, 2010 at 3:58 am

    Hi Mr. Bustos,

    Thanks for posting this. I wasn’t able to grab a copy of the PDI issue featuring this. Tita Nonia texted me the day before that she has an article coming up =)

    best

    noni

  292. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 27, 2010 at 8:30 am

    Santa Rosa: A many-splendored place
    By Nonia D. Tiongco

    Reflecting on the town of my birth, and five generations before me, and now the city of my retirement (from academic work, estate management, coordinator of ex-patriates’ projects), seeing the garden abloom once again with the onset of rains, birds chirping, white butterflies fluttering, the soothing drip-drop from the indoor fountain, I cannot help but affirm that Santa Rosa ay bayang pinili ng Panginoon na pagkatiwalaan ng biyaya (was chosen by the Lord to receive his blessings).

    I grew up in a veritable living museum — the church, school, municipio and plaza all within short walking distances — and the ancestral house (one of nine in the poblacion), home to generations of strong, determined, community-involved family members, a continuum of the creative minority without which a society cannot grow, be relevant or responsive.

    Santa Rosa was once part of Biñan. Then it became a city via a plebiscite on July 10, 2004. Santa Rosa’s two irrigation systems watered 2,000 hectares, 5,000 acres at a cost of P342,000 (1910 American Colonial Government assessment); there were two-crop per year cycle in contrast to the one-crop schedule based on sahod-ulan. The men were spared from forced labor and probably the roots of dysfunctionality in the Filipino psyche. Some of the anak ng Santa Rosa were Maria Carpena, the first Filipino recording artist in 1912; Dr. Andres Tiongco Zavalla, the first Filipino neurosurgeon; Atty. Domingo Tiongco Zavalla, delegate to the Commonwealth Constitutional Convention; Dr. Jose Zavalla Tiongco, who topped the Medical Board Exam of 1936; Celerino Castillo Tiongco, president of the Sakdalista Party and presidential candidate in the 1935 election. And now, in the third millennium, Santa Rosa is the investment capital in Southern Luzon and the next-wave city.

    Our recent appointment with history was Sept. 20, 2005 for the unveiling of the historical marker on the Cuartel de Santo Domingo, which was the 1877 headquarters of the Guardia Civil, meant to check social banditry or tulisanismo.

    Our specialty foods — Bok’s ice cream, Aling Nene’s okoy, Eder’s kalamay kuwit, Loleng’s kilawing puso, Mipuy’s sinukmane and cultural trips to our ancestral houses.In the quaintness and quietude of my garden in our 4,000-sq.m. compound behind what used to be the Casa Hacienda (destroyed in the fire of 1923 and the dreaded garrison of the Japanese Occupation, now the elementary school), keeping me company are a white-stone angel by the gate and a stone lady painted pink. Both are creations of local sculptor David “Igan” Dia to all who knew him, who refurbished in 1925 the Bantayang Bato of 1850, made the 1931 Santa Rosa Arch, and the 1959 statue of Jose Rizal in the plaza. In the 21st century, with the 2006 renovation of the plaza, the Rizal monument now stands tall and proud with the distinction of having the highest pylons in the Philippines (18.3 meters from the ground), second in the world, three inches short of the Rizal monument in China (home province of Domingo Lamco, Rizal’s forefather who settled in Tubigan, Biñan, Laguna)

  293. June 25, 2010 at 12:14 pm

    Maria Laura:

    Thank you so much for your generosity and valuable input about the Lopez de Leon family.

    If only more of the old Binanenses would come forward and relate their histories [ before they are finally lost to the winds ], we would have a truly significant monograph about the families of Old Binan, Laguna.

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  294. Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon said,

    June 23, 2010 at 10:17 am

    What a wonderful surprise! Noni, yes, your Mom and my dearest Ma’am Virgie introduced you as Anthony. How is she? Give her my hugs and kisses.

    This is great!! I will go through the Blue Book again and look for the names you mentioned, and next time I’m home I’ll visit the old San Jose Capilia (will have to ask a family member to take me there, I don’t remember where it is).

    Nice to be reconnected with Binanenses!

    Take care, and see you again, here or back home!

    Lala

  295. Noni Agulto said,

    June 23, 2010 at 7:56 am

    NHCP on ALBERTO HOUSE
    photo courtesy of JC Bernardo, extracted from http://filipinoscribbles.wordpress.com/2010/06/03/the-alberto-mansion-binans-struggle-for-its-identity/)

    1. The NHCP exhausted all possible means to convince the owner (Gerardo Alberto) to retain and preserve his property (the Alberto House) in its original setting in Biñan, Laguna, and to prevent its eventual demolition.

    2. Two or three years ago, the NHI coordinated with Mr. Alberto on several schemes it prepared for the structure’s rehabilitation and adaptive reuse. The structure was already in a bad state of conservation, and deterioration and material losses were getting worse. The rehabilitation and adaptive re-use of the house were not pushed through by the owner for reasons beyond the control of the government.

    3. The NHI prepared guidelines and recommendatory measures for the preservation of the Alberto House. These were forwarded to Mr. Alberto.

    4. Several meetings had already been conducted at the Alberto House among the owner/s, Biñan local officials, Ms. Gemma Cruz, the design consultant, and NHI officials and technical staff. The owner/s repeatedly explained his/their plans for the old house and what assistance can be provided by the government if their house is declared a Historical Landmark or a Heritage House. Otherwise, Mr. Alberto reiterated that he is already quite old, and the decision that would serve the family’s best interest should be made soonest.

    5. Before the controversy, the local government of Biñan was not interested in the preservation of the Alberto House. It signified its protest to the owner when it came to know that the Alberto family had already committed the transfer (dismantling and reconstruction) of the house from Biñan to Bagac, Bataan.

    6. For so many years, the Municipality of Biñan allowed the proliferation of makeshift structures around the house, thus obliterating the majestic view of the old structure. If they considered the house as an important Landmark and part of their heritage, why did they not attempt to clear the area for visitors to appreciate the structure?

    7. In 2004, the NHI Board approved in principle the installation of a historical marker for the house. NHI wrote Mr. Alberto regarding the proposed marker, and stipulated his compliance for the removal of obstructive and unsightly signage at the ground floor facade. The marker was not installed since Mr. Alberto did not react very positively to the conditions set by NHI.

    8. The Alberto House is a private property. The Alberto family does not want the government declaration because now, the Bagac deal best serves the family’s interests and needs.

    9. The Alberto House is not a declared National Historical Landmark nor a Heritage House because of its bad state of conservation (less than 70% authenticity), the owner’s non-acceptance of any declaration and installation of a historical marker, and his refusal to donate the property to the government (local or national).

    10. The house cannot be 435 years old as claimed, having been built in 1575. The construction method of the original house used cut nails made of steel. Steel was first used in Europe during the Industrial Revolution. Therefore, the Alberto House could have been constructed between the late 1700s to early 1800s. The year 1575 may have referred to the family escutcheon, as the original owner’s father was decorated with a Spanish order during that time.

    11. As time drags on, the Alberto House continues to deteriorate and accumulate damages, thus lessening the historical value and conservation opportunities of the structure. If no intervention/maintenance efforts are made, the house will certainly be totally lost.

    12. It is not necessarily true and apropos to automatically declare any or all structures 50 years old or more an Important Cultural Property, a National Historical Landmark, or a Heritage House without passing through the established criteria. It will be very much prejudicial to the significance/quality of the structures/artifacts of historical or cultural importance, and to the best practices in selecting nationally-significant historical and cultural heritage.

    13. A personal heritage may not necessarily be another person’s heritage; a family’s heritage may not necessarily be another family’s heritage; a community’s heritage may not be another community’s heritage… But we can have a national heritage whereby all citizens can claim the right to preserve and protect it. Likewise, in a world heritage, all peoples in the world have the right to preserve and protect it regardless of race, religion or ideology.

    14. Some residents of Biñan approached NHI, asking if there is still a way to prevent the planned transfer of the Alberto House to Bagac. Architect Reynaldo A. Inovero advised them that if there would be any offer to fully restore the Alberto House for the family, and a place for the family’s proposed commercial establishment, perhaps the interested party can approach the Alberto family and make this proposal. Otherwise, there is no better alternative to the Bagac transfer in terms of the owner’s advantage.

    15. The term used by heritage advocates is the “demolition” (Demolition of 200-year-old home of Rizal mom stopped, PDI, June 2, 2010). The correct term is dismantling, in order for the house to be transferred to Bagac. NHI does not advocate the destruction of any structure. We consider all options for a structure’s preservation, including compromises.

    16. The one disadvantage of the transfer of the house to Bagac is Biñan losing one of its most important historical structures.7 June 2010

  296. Noni Agulto said,

    June 23, 2010 at 1:16 am

    Hi Tita Lala!

    Great to hear from you here in Toto’s blog…. (noni, here or anthony to some of you who know my mom, virginia granado-agulto) I remember the first and last time i saw you was during the wake of your dad. We never got to meet when i was in tokyo. =)

    Aside from what you have mentioned, the Lopez de Leon surnames appear on the Yaptinchay genealogy in the Branch of Simeona Yaptinchay and Aniceto Yatco. one of their grandchildren married a Lopez de Leon if I am not mistaken. If you also look inside the old San Jose Capilia, you will find tombstones of more deceased Carrillo-Trinidad y Gana….should be interesting to trace the relationships. =)

    best

    noni

  297. Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon said,

    June 22, 2010 at 6:09 pm

    I’d like to make a correction to the 5th paragraph.

    Their eldest son Don Mariano married Dona Isidra Potenciano, also of Binan. The second child of this union, Don Pascual, was my grandfather. . . .

  298. Maria Laura C. Lopez de Leon said,

    June 22, 2010 at 5:57 pm

    Hello!
    This is awesome, oh so fascinating read. I am truly thankful to my classmate Annie Souza de Mesa for posting the link to this site on Facebook. This is proving to be a great reference for a personal project.

    As you may guess, I am a native of Binan. Truth is I have started since about a year ago to continue the family tree – actually a small “Blue Book” that contains “almost all” of the members of the Lopez de Leon family from the first generation to the fifth, ending with entries on my grandfather’s generation.

    You wrote that there were usually one or two core families, and you mentioned Carrillo-Trinidad and Gana. Indeed, there is a connection – I had heard my folks speak of their names, and the blue book showed it clearly.

    The 1st generation of our family originated from Palanyag, now Paranaque. I believe it was by marriage that the Binan branch of the family was established. Third generation, youngest child Don Pedro Lopez de Leon y Ferrer, who was Teniente Mayor of Binan in 1894-1895, was married to Dona Maxima C. Trinidad y Gana.

    Their eldest son Don Mariano married Dona Isidra Potenciano, also of Binan. Their second son Don Pascual was my grandfather. The small / modest family home still stands on Calle Capinpin, which I consider Binan’s main street. Across the house was the spacious grounds and old home of Gen. Mateo Capinpin. (I wonder if it’s still there.) Along that street as you all guys know were the famous homes “bahay-na-bato” of the Potencianos, Tan Ganas, Yaptinchays, etc. *My apologies, I’ve been away for a long time, I may have mixed up families and their locations.

    I thought then that Binan was rather “small” because everybody knew everybody – we were all related somehow …. many Lolos and Lolas’ hands to kiss, many Titos and Titas’ cheeks to kiss. The people of my youth in Binan were all gracious and polite and generous.

    I miss the rhythm of those times, and I miss the sights and sounds of old Binan. Well, I guess I can always come back to this blog/site for some reminiscing.

    Thank you!

  299. Noni Agulto said,

    June 17, 2010 at 2:53 am

    Dear Toto,

    Something to write in your Gana entries… Vicente Tang Gana is the oldest Gana on record in the genealogy map… he is 2 generations ahead of Alberto Yaptinchay, who married his grand daughter Macaria Gana by his son Gaspar Gana. Since Alberto Yaptinchay was born 1822… and his dad ( TIN CHAY YAP ) was brought in to the country when he was a “chiquito” ( 5-7 y.o. ) that would probably have been 20-25 years earlier that 1822… Vicente may have been here in the country anytime between 1770-1780…

    Vicente by his first wife Gertrudes de los Reyes had one child… Gaspar Gana from this line spawned the children Rufino, Gregorio, Francisca, Donata,who married a Carrillo, Macaria who married Alberto Yaptinchay ( who spawned the Fabled yaptinchay siblings Julia, Andres, Guido, Maria, Josefa,Bibiana, Reymunda and Pablo ) and Ceferina who married Mariano Potenciano ( who spawned the siblings Pablo, Ubaldo and ????? ) =)

    From Vicente’s second wife… Tomasa… spawned the children:

    Eulalio who married Florentina Potenciano who children include:
    Eduardo who married Filomena Ocampo and bore the children Filomeno Vicente and Maria
    Jesualdo who married Crisanta Cruz and Petronila Carrillo-Trinidad
    Flaviana who married Mariano Lopez
    Ciriaco and Teodora

    Jose Gana who married Regina Marabillas Custodio who children were:
    Isabela, maria, Jose, Miguel, Agustin, Mariano, Rosa

    and Petrona and Roman both single.

    =)

  300. Noni Agulto said,

    June 17, 2010 at 2:22 am

    Hi toto… i don’t know up to how long they can hold on….they say binan is now challenging the newly signed heritage bill…hopefully this bill has enough fangs to keep the alberto house where it is right now…

    I mentioned this to doctor sta maria of the UACCD who advocates the prevention of the house’s demolition that:
    it breaks my heart to see that it had to take 2 yaptinchay houses and the carillo house for binan to realize that its heritage is slowly slipping away.

    Gerry Alberto said the house is private property and he is a religious payer of his real estate dues so there is no reason for the government to harass him… partly true… if he is in need of dinero and the house is such a burden for him…. the government should just buy it from him at a price he could not resist…. then both parties are satisfied…if the local government sees the house is worth saving.

    Gerry wants the house torn down so that the real estate can be converted to a commercial establishment.

    To sonny: I am so amazed that now there is a name behind petronila carrillo trinidad…. and her roots are now clear… im so happy …i can add this to the family tree we have…
    it is also worth noting that while Petronila CT was married to Fermin Y. Yatco…(in the yaptinchay family tree) i also saw from the gana genalogy that Petronila was also married (probably as a second wife) to Capitan Don Jesualdo Gana, whose 1st wife is Crisanta Cruz. =) I’d be happy to send you a copy of the genealogy map that i have. =)

    best

    noni

  301. Sonny Rayos said,

    June 12, 2010 at 12:10 am

    Toto,
    Greetings from Austin, Texas. Thank you for your compliment. It just gave me more inspiration to find out more about my heritage. Believe me, it has been a wonderful experience – a lot of goose bump moments. To think the Asuncions and Paternos were rocking and rolling the political and arts arena during the turn of the century – just make me say “I am not worthy.” There is also the putang ina moment, as in, the first hand account of the execution of Sancho Valenzuela by the Spaniards in Bagumbayan. (Sancho Valenzuela is the son of Gregoria Asuncion Valenzuela (Gregoria is the first daughter of Manuel Asuncion – the first born Maria de la Paz Molo and Mariano Kagalitan Asuncion). Thank you indeed for allowing me to comment.

    I do have some corrections in my first post. I omitted names. Cayo Alzona’s siblings are: Encarnacion, Luz, Cesar, Socorro, Augusto and Octavio. Also Ramona Asuncion Carillo Trinidad siblings are: Petronila, Josefa, Joaquin, Eutiquio, Angela, Irene, Filomena and Anicia.

    If you can help, I am facing a brick wall finding the Revilla family branch of the family tree. These are dead ends: Agueda Asuncion married Maximo Revilla and their siblings are Bibiana, Rufina,Tomas and Eugen. Also dead end is Canuta Asuncion married Zalvidea Revilla.

    Your website is a great resource. Keep it up.
    Sonny

  302. June 11, 2010 at 6:55 pm

    Sonny:

    Thank you so much for that fantastic piece of information about the interrelationships of the Kagalitan-Asuncion family to the Paterno Molo de San Agustin family both of Santa Cruz, Manila and from there to the Carillo-Trinidad and Yaptinchay of Binan, Laguna. Very historical and very interesting!!!

    It is the first time I have come across an accurate, detailed recollection of the blood relationships between those families. I will share this information at once with my good friend, Filipiniana scholar Ramon N. Villegas, and I am sure that he too, will find it very, very interesting.

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  303. Sonny Rayos said,

    June 11, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    Herewith is my contribution to this Binan’s who’s who. The families Carillo-Trinidad, Yatco and Yaptinchay are intertwined via marriage to the Santa Cruz, Manila family of Ming Mong Lo (which later became Molo and much later also became Paterno). Maria de la Paz Molo is the half sister of Pedro Paterno (of the Biak na Bato pact). She married Mariano Kagalitan (later became known as Asumpcion, then Asuncion). Name changes occurred because of the 1849 Claveria Decree which required locals to change native surnames to Hispanic surnames. Mariano Sr. is himself an accomplished artist. The Molo/Paterno-Kagalitan/Asuncion union produced several children, amongst which are Manuel, Antonio, Mariano, Leoncio (sculptor and my branch of the family), and Justiniano, the master portrait artist. It’s pathetic that the female Asuncions do not get any credit.

    Romana, the ninth child of the union of Antonio Asuncion and Remegia Sta. Ana is the favorite portrait subject of the master artist, Justiano Asuncion, her uncle. Ramona married Andres Carillo Trinidad and she bequeathed the following children: Petronila (married Fermin Yatco) Josefa (married Engracio Quintos), Joaquin, Angela (married gentleman surnamed Eugenio), Filomena (Castrillo), and Anicia (Hipolito Habacon).

    The Asuncion family tree shows a solid branch of the Andres Carillo Trinidad and Romana Asuncion. The eldest of this union, Petronila, married Fermin Yatco, which according to the Yaptinchay genealogy is the son of Simeona Yaptinchay and Aniceto Yatco. The sons and daughters of Petronila and Fermin, according to the Asuncion family tree, are Macario, Mariano, Catalina, Gertrudes, Feliza, Jose, Basilisa, Belen and Epifania.

    Besides Ramona, one other daughter of Antonio Asuncion and Remegia Sta. Ana married a Yatco. Valentina Asuncion Yatco’s children are: Eleuterio, Jose, Leoncio (married Teodora Marcelino) and Filomena (married Eugenio Alzona). The Alzona’s are also from Binan. Filomena Alzona’s children are Jose, Agripino and Cayo. Cayo (married Amoranto) relocated his family to Tayabas, Quezon his children are Encarnacion, Luz, Ceasar, Augusto and Octavio. The reader is further encouraged to read up on Encarnacion Alzona. There is currently a State Congressman from Maryland named Augustus Alzona – judging from his name (please note emperor’s name usage in the first names), he is related to Alzona family in P.I.

    In addition to Binan, the old town of Pila, Laguna also has Asuncion descendants. The second daughter of Antonio Asuncion and Remigia Sta. Ana, Juliana, married a gentleman whose surname is Bartolome. Juliana Asuncion Bartolome’s siblings are: Jacoba, Maria, Juan, Juana, Esteban, Simeona, Polenciar(?), and Mario. Juan Bartolome’s daughters are: Teodula (married Relova), Salvadora (married Alava), Asuncion (married Bartolome), Erundina (married Fernandez), Teresa (married Valenzuela) and Amelia (married Bartolome). Ppphheeewww, that’s a lot of estrogen in that family!

    My maternal grandmother is Feliza Asuncion-Palileo. My Lolo Jose Palileo’s ancestral roots, I believe are, from Pagsanjan, Laguna (still have to research this one). Feliza’s brother is Jose Maria Asuncion, who was the UP School of Fine Arts Secretary in the early 1900s. As mentioned earlier, Leoncio Asuncion, the sculptor, is our main trunk of the family tree.

    Thank you very much for allowing me to contribute to this forum. Finally, it is not only in historical notes that the Asuncions are related to the families in Binan, but also the Molo-Paternos/Kagalitan-Asuncions are in their blood.

  304. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 9, 2010 at 1:03 pm

    Binan’s inconvenient truth
    By GEMMA CRUZ-ARANETA

    To my dismay, cousin Gerry Alberto sold their ancestral home in Biñan to a resort owner in Bataan. I can’t imagine what the plaza will look like now without that venerable house at the corner, like a sentinel, guardian of the town’s (now city) arcane saga.

    It was traumatic enough for the town folk to witness the demolition of the elegant Yaptinchay house years ago, to give way to an ugly bus terminal; subsequently, a misguided local official defaced the charming plaza by installing an enormous galvanized steel roof over it to turn the historic square into a multi-purpose whatever.

    Biñan endured, the Alberto house a mute witness to all that cultural and historical destruction perpetrated by indifference if not lack of information. Alas, heritage in itself is an inconvenient truth; and to conserve heritage consciously and methodically could be just as inconvenient as climate change and global warming.

    But it has to be done properly, for the sake of future generations. Tall and debonair Al Gore flew into town and gave a soul-searching lecture entitled “the Inconvenient Truth” (Asian version) which was about the irreparably negative impact of climate change and global warming.

    I could not resist borrowing that compelling title, Mr. Gore: If you ask me, there are many more inconvenient truths in heritage conservation than in climate change

  305. Enrique Bustos said,

    June 7, 2010 at 1:17 pm

    Biñan memories
    By GEMMA CRUZ-ARANETA

    When my redoutable Tio Zoilo Alberto was still alive, the sumptuous dinner parties he hosted in his ancestral home during Binan fiestas were like scenes from Rizal’s Noli and Fili.

    It was always open house but the formal dining room, a glimpse away from the grand staircase, was reserved for local dignitaries, the cura parroco, police officials, the Biñan elite, long-lost relatives, and VIPs from Manila. Crisostomo Ibarra’s homecoming had a similar guest list.

    While toasting and wishing each other well, they always debated animatedly, sometimes raucously, on palpitating controversies, usually political. I am certain that no one would have batted an eye lash had Jose Rizal himself suddenly made an appearance.

    After all, he lived there as a young boy, when he was a student at a parochial school in Biñan, before he was sent to the Ateneo Municipal in Intramuros. His mother, Teodora Alonso, lived in that same house when she was still single. Apparently, she was a relative of the Albertos, but did not get along well with some in-laws, according to the family grapevine.

    When Tio Zoilo passed on, it was as if the blazing lights in that house were quickly extinguished and deterioration crept in with adamantine certainty. The last time I was invited, there was a pulverulent glow from the dining room window and on the bare table cousin Gerry Alberto had spread out an old architectural plan of his historic ancestral home. What to do?

    There was an architect from the National Historical Institute (Commission, once again) and a retired army officer turned contractor/builder. We were brainstorming about adaptive reuse which would jump start heritage tourism and revive traditional crafts needed for conservation of a cluster of heritage homes nearby. I hope those plans materialize before Biñan loses a physical reminder of a poignant chapter of its history

  306. June 4, 2010 at 5:37 pm

    Noni:

    Thank you so much for that.

    Will Mayor Marlene “Len-len” Alonte-Naguiat really succeed in keeping the Alberto ancestral house in Binan City, Laguna where it really belongs, right smack in the plaza?

    Toto Gonzalez :)

  307. Noni Agulto said,

    June 3, 2010 at 1:49 am

    Laguna town prevents demolition of Rizal mom’s home
    By Maricar Cinco
    Philippine Daily Inquirer
    First Posted 16:53:00 06/02/2010

    Filed Under: history, Culture (general)
    SAN PEDRO, Laguna, Philippines—The city government of Biñan in Laguna on Wednesday stopped the demolition of the 200-year-old ancestral home of the family of Teodora Alonso, mother of national hero Jose Rizal, and announced plans to acquire the property so as not to lose the city’s cultural heritage to a resort in Bataan.

    The two-story house, with a floor-area of about 600 square meters, was built in the 1800s in the heart of the city opposite what is now the Biñan city hall.

    The house, locally known as the Alberto Mansion, was owned by the family of Jose Alberto Alonso, the father of Teodora.

    According to the local group United Artists for Cultural Conservation and Development, the current property owner Gerardo Alberto, had closed a deal to sell off the house to Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar, a heritage resort, in Bagac, Bataan.

    It said about 20 percent of the house’s interior was already “demolished” as of this week.

    “All the antique furniture were already taken out. The ceiling was also already taken off,” said Rosauro Sta. Maria, the group’s president and executive director, whose honorary chairman is also Biñan Mayor Marlyn Alonte-Naguiat.

    Sta. Maria said the demolition was being carried out despite the non-issuance of a demolition permit by the city government to the property owner.

    “We fully understand the plight of the Albertos—how costly it is to maintain such an old house and maybe that was why they were forced to sell it,” said Sta. Maria.

    But Sta. Maria appealed to the Albertos not to take the valuable piece of heritage out of Biñan as losing it means losing the identity of the city.

    “Understanding the present, means knowing the glorious past,” he said, adding that little is known about Biñan being a part of the history.

    He said both Rizal’s parents, Franciso Mercado and Toedora, were natives of Biñan. The hero himself spent years in Biñan while he was in grade school.

    “I asked our city engineering office to order a halt to the demolition. We have not issued them a permit for the demolition,” said Vice Mayor Arman Dimaguila in a phone interview.

    He said the city council in a hearing on Thursday will discuss the mechanics of acquiring the house, which the city government could renovate to house a proposed Binan cultural affairs office.

    The house was priced between P500,000 and P1 million.

    “Our call is for the Albertos to heed the proposal of the city government of Biñan. If that won’t do, we are appealing to Jerry Acuzar, owner of the heritage resort, to instead donate the house to Biñan City and we will forever be indebted to him,” Sta Maria said.

    Bryan Jason Borja, artistic director of the United Artists for Cultural Conservation and Development, said they were organizing a cultural protest and were inviting artists and cultural workers to join their campaign against the demolition of the heritage home.

  308. Noni Agulto said,

    June 1, 2010 at 6:46 am

    Hi Ms. Acuna,

    “Lolo Moy”, yes he is my dad’s first cousin…Lola Bada was lolo Moy’s mom….her husban is Miguel (Lolo Engge) Yaptinchay….i heard from my dad that lolo engge had “another daughter”….. i’m glad to have come across you here,kamag-anak. Toto has seen the family pic which i posted in flickr…and yes lolo moy is “muy guapito”
    just the same we are illegitimate from a higher branch of the family tree. =) we should talk about this =)

    best

    noni

  309. Dorotea Alonte Acuna said,

    May 30, 2010 at 4:00 pm

    I’d like to ask if there is a certain Guillermo Yaptinchay among them. My mother claimed him as his half brother.I remember having met Guillermo or Mimoy Yaptinchay back in the late 60’s. he was good-looking somewhat have some features of my mother. My mother is Justina Alonte. She passed away in the year 2000. I remember her mentioning about a certain Bada married to the Yaptinchay who happened to be his father. I was not so inquisitive then so i never bothered asking her about the name of his father….he said that his father lived in the bahay na bato. Since she was born out of wedlock her mother, as she mentioned was the late Dorotea Alonte and her brother was a certain Primo Alonte.

  310. Zaldy Alora said,

    May 29, 2010 at 4:47 am

    Hello,
    Maybe , you can help us trace our roots. Our clan came from Dalmacio Alora, son of Agapita Alora. My grandfather was born in 1876 somewhere in San Jose, Binan, Laguna. My grandmother Antonia Almaria (later changed to Almario) was theborn in 1890, was the second wife of my grandfather Dalmacio. My grandmother’s parenst were Leoncio Almaria and Natalia Mance. According to my father Angeles, the oldest son of Dalmacio and my uncle Nicanor Alora, that their grandfather last name was Cang Co (Cangco), part Chinese. Our clan are related to the Lim Aco’s, the Alora’s of Dela Paz, San Jose, San Anton ( now Santo Nino). There are Aloras in Mindanao, Visayas, all over parts of Luzon , North America.

  311. Noni Agulto said,

    May 27, 2010 at 11:13 am

    Tito Vic, i hope you can discuss further the background and history of the Casas in Binan, of course in the family we can only discuss your Yaptinchay-Almeda lineage but not much about Francisco Casas’ story.

    Noni

  312. kat marfori arciaga said,

    May 27, 2010 at 2:44 am

    its very interesting to know ur roots…my family is from binan also….accdg. to my grandma from my father side…wer from d roots of marfori-reyes clan…..i hope there is sum 1 out there who could help me trace it…and know our true origins…from spanish roots or italian……tnx….

  313. Enrique Bustos said,

    May 26, 2010 at 2:33 pm

    The portrait of Romana A. Carillo by Justiniano Asuncion is in the Cecille Yulo Locsin collection.

  314. May 26, 2010 at 2:00 pm

    Dr. Victor:

    Thank you for the information. We will include it ASAP in the Casas section of the blog post.

    Your siblings Joy Casas Manabat-Belisario and Tom Casas Manabat were our gracious and wonderful hosts during lunch for the A-MRMF Assumption Mother Rosa Memorial Foundation core group at the Casas ancestral house last 05 May 2010.

    Again, thank you.

    Toto Gonzalez

  315. Victor Manabat said,

    May 26, 2010 at 1:22 pm

    About the Casas ancestral house.
    Three families that came from the union of Francisco Casas and Encarnacion Almeda grew up in that house. Ma. Paz Casas married Ramon Gana Mercado. Trinidad Casas married Dr. Alfonso Cuyegkeng while the youngest daughter Carmen Casas married Francisco Manabat.
    All the children of these three families grew up and played in that old house.
    It must also be noted that the Casas ancestral house was used as the residence of Christopher de Leon’s character in “Ganito kami noon, Paano kayo ngayon”.

  316. Cita Yaptinchay Abad-Dinglasan said,

    May 23, 2010 at 2:10 pm

    Toto,
    I am back in Manila, until I start to feel like climbing the walls again or die from the pollution or the scorching heat. Call me soon – I am listed. I’d like to laugh and eat and exchange ideas with u.

    Cita – no more aunt. coz it dates me. I’d rather have a real date! hahaha

  317. Noni Agulto said,

    May 11, 2010 at 7:43 am

    Adding to the long line of Binan Mayors, Marlene Alonte-Naguiat once again claims Mayorship of Binan. This will be her first term as City Mayor. Her previous term was as Municipal Mayor. =p

    Cookie who ran for vice mayor lost to Atty Arman Dimaguila….

    Binan old money who have assured themselves of seats in the city council include Rene Casas Manabat and Atty Jun Tan-Gana.

  318. Enrique Bustos said,

    April 23, 2010 at 7:50 am

    About comment # 4 re: The Bautista Family of Malolos, Bulacan:

    The wealth of the Bautista family of Malolos, Bulacan originated from their Tanjosoy ancestors who engaged in the business of making candles with consistent profits since candle was always in demand until electricity came to Malolos in 1894 the Tanjosoy shop which sold candles also vended other wares and by dint of hardwork the Tanjosoy slowly accumulated capital apparently the items dispensed at this shop were very much needed by the natives such that some actually agreed to clear lands in Calumpit,Hagonoy,& Paombong in exchange for candles and other wares in this manner were some of the Tanjosoy lands acquired although the more common way was still through the Pacto the classic instrument of land alienation by which the indio landowner pawned his land for ready cash with an option to redeem his land by the time of the sugar boom of the 19th century the Tanjosoy concentrated their efforts in planting and processing sugar in their lands the large vats imported by their ancestors from China that were used for candle making were now used as vats for boiling sugarcane juice to be made into Muscovado Sugar

    Dona Rufina Tanjosoy-Santos daughter Felipa T.Santos married Jose Bautista their son Antonio S.Bautista was an aide to then President Emilio Aguinaldo married Loreto Tanjosoy-Santos Antonio & Loreto are the Grandparents of Dez Bautista the Bautista Family donated 200 hectares of their land to the Bulacan Provincial Government the land now is where the Bulacan Capitol and the Bulacan State University stands

    Don Jose Bautista owns the now famous (Bautista Mansion), which was built in 1877. It once housed the Ministry of Interiors during the first Philippine Republic. The Mansion is situated along the nostalgic Kamistisuhan District
    where other affluent families lives such as Tantoco,Tanchangco,Chiong,Tiongson,Santos,Reyes,Cojuangco & Chichioco families

    the Bautista ancestral mansion was visited by the national hero Dr. Jose Rizal to convince Triumvirate of the Ten Gentlemen of Malolos to join the La Liga Filipina. it one of three houses that i know that has a Fernando Amorsolo mural in the ceiling of their house the other two a in the Dr Luis Santos house also in Malolos Bulacan and the Paez-Luna house in Malabon

    An ancestor of the Cojuangco Family Juan Cojuangco Married Trinidad Tiongson of a prominent family in Malolos they are the great grand parents of Ysidra & Melencio Cojuangco, Melencio married Tecla Chichioco whose family was already engaged in the barter trade in the 1870’s Tecla brother Bonifacio & Ma Paz (Biang) sold goods at the Malolos market following the career paths of their parents while still single Tecla already decided it would be more profitable to buy meat, dresses and linen from manila and sell it at the Malolos market rather than join the crowd of Chinese merchants in Manila.

  319. Enrique Bustos said,

    April 19, 2010 at 8:51 am

    Villar firm’s high-end project sits on land for poor

    Portofino is a 300-hectare community of different enclaves where houses and commercial areas have sun-drenched colors and high arched windows and archways. The architecture and design are inspired by a seaport town in Southern Italy named Portofino, meaning “fine gateway.”

    But before the property became a gated subdivision and an enclave of the rich, Portofino was originally meant for low-cost houses .

    The land was originally an agricultural land. The heirs of Conrado Potenciano owned 113 hectares.

    In 1988, the Potenciano family and the National Housing Authority (NHA) entered into an agreement to develop the site for low-cost housing. The NHA is the government agency mandated to provide shelter to the lowest 30% of the urban population, most of them living in slums.

    The NHA filed before the Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) a request to convert the property from agricultural to non-agricultural. In 1989, it was granted.

    The 1989 DAR conversion order gave Potenciano and the NHA 10 years to develop the site. The land’s tenants, who would have been the beneficiaries of the property had it been covered by the Comprehensive Agricultural Reform Program, were paid with disturbance compensation.

    However, for some reason, the NHA backed out of the project.

    With the NHA out, Potenciano and his heirs the wife of Dr Victor Potenciano,Irma Ponce Enrile Potenciano is the Half Sister of Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile entered into a “Land Development Agreement” in 1993 with Adelfa Properties Inc. and Britanny Corp, both owned by the Villar Group. At the time, Villar, who has already made a stamp in the real estate industry, was a newly elected congressman and was starting a political career.
    Daang Hari Road

    In 1999, prior to the expiration of the 1989 DAR conversion order, Adelfa Properties and Britanny Corp. filed for an extension of the development period. It cited as grounds the construction of the Daang-Hari road, among others.

    The Daang Hari road traverses Las Piñas and Bacoor, Cavite, in effect providing access points to Pontefino from existing major roads, including those that serve posh Ayala Alabang Village, and the Madrigal Business Park.it was previously reported that the construction of Daang Hari was funded by the congressional allocation of Senator Villar in 2003 coursed through the Department of Public Works and Highways.)

    Adelfa Properties also sought a new order granting the conversion without any limitation to any specific use and development.

    That same year, two groups of petitioners who are heirs of former tenants, asked the DAR to revoke its 1989 order and revert the property to agricultural land. The petitioners argued that the conversion plan was violated since the 10-year period has lapsed.

    The DAR rejected the petitions of the two groups of petitioners, prompting them to separately appeal before the Office of the President and the Court of Appeals.

    In March 2004, the Office of the President issued a resolution reclassifying the Potenciano property into agricultural land. Adelfa Properties filed a motion for reconsideration but was also denied.

    The decision of the Office of the President, however, was short victory for the former tenants.
    Connection to the president?

    Atty ResitutoMendoza, who was then hired by Adelfa Properties as in-house counsel, filed a second motion for consideration at the Office of the President. In October 2004, the Office of the President reversed itself and junked the tenants’ petition.

    The Court of Appeals also junked the tenants’ petition.

    Mendoza wrote on his labor complaint that he was elated for winning. It was his first big case. He was the one who insisted of filing a second motion for reconsideration, which is not generally entertained, but he argued it could be allowed be in exceptionally meritorious cases.

    Mendoza thought he won the case through merit. He would have a rude awakening.

    In the succeeding years of working with Villar’s lawyers and senior officers, he wrote that he found that the Potenciano case was won “through a connection within the Office of the President.”

    When he found this out, “it took complainant months to get over his guilt by knowing that he was instrumental to what he realized later as an injustice to hundreds of farmers hoping to regain their lost land,” Mendoza narrated.

    Mendoza said that, when the farmers initially won at the Office of the President, they were seeking P25 million as settlement. He opposed the move, but curiously, Villar’s senior officers were willing to compromise. He bargained for P200,000, which the tenants at first accepted and later rejected.

    He wrote that he would later realize Villar’s trusted men were getting kickbacks from settlement payments. The P200,000 settlement he was pushing apparently also angered Villar’s senior officers.

  320. Marco Llagas said,

    April 16, 2010 at 2:36 pm

    By the way, may grandmother’s name is Feliza Fernandez & first married to Atty. Benito Tesoro. After her Fist husband’s death she wed my grandfather Sancho Llagas.

  321. Marco Llagas said,

    April 16, 2010 at 2:28 pm

    Hi Noni,

    Though my lola never had an easy life as a growing child and even as mom raising a huge clan. I am glad that her triumphant struggles in raising her family reap fruit maybe not during her lifetime but with her next generation. Fate may not be very kind but it didn’t stop her from moving on.

    Our past may hold lots of untold stories about our roots. I’m still hopeful that someday, somehow, we may cross paths and find ways to give meaning to these connections.

    Really appreciated your insights

    Nevertheless I have a picture in mind of what could have been had my Lola was raised with her father.

    Had she grew up with her father, maybe she wouldn’t meet my Lolo and in that case, I wouldn’t be here either.

    Fate couldn’t be that bad at all.

    As you Toto Gonzalez said “it is not what we are given in life but what we make of it.”

    Cheers!

  322. April 16, 2010 at 10:12 am

    My observation: In our Gonzalez de Sulipan clan, several illegitimate sons and daughters [ of the previous generation ] pursued higher education, became successful technocrats and entrepreneurs, married equally successful people, and led accomplished, fortunate, and beautiful lives.

    Truly, it is not what we are given in life but what we make of it. :) :) :)

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  323. Noni Agulto said,

    April 16, 2010 at 9:44 am

    Hi Marco!

    The shame of being spawned illegitimate is no strange thing to my family… we, my paternal grandfather and his two sisters (my grandaunts), were illegitimate children of Don Guido Yaptinchay by his last relationship (to Isidra Bergonia). Out of shame, Isidra Bergonia’s children from Don Guido were gifted the surname Agulto by Isidra’s good friend (who was in fact an Agulto).

    Your lola’s story is a similar one except my grandparents experienced growing up with their father, in his household. =)

    best,

    Noni

  324. Marco Llagas said,

    April 15, 2010 at 11:33 pm

    Hi Noni,

    I’m grateful that you knew something about my grand Lolo Lorenzo Gana. It was really a sad thing to hear that nobody could attest of what really happened way back then. I believe it would help if I could give a brief description of what happened as relayed to me by may parents. My Lelang was a household of the Gana’s in Binan. She was from Pasig. During those pre-Japanese time, bearing a child out of wed-lock was a taboo. My Lelang’s lifestyle is way far beyond what the Gana have already at that time and for some reason she refused to stay shelter at the Gana’s residence. She left the house of Gana’s and hid from Lorenzo the fact that they had a child. But the news came to Lorenzo and he did try to find his only child. Accordingto the old fellows, it was also published in the newspapers during those times that Lorenzo Gana is in search for his child. As a twist of fate, after a few more years, my Lola Felicia married Atty. Tesoro. Atty. Tesoro had a chance to finally meet Lorenzo Gana at the court which he is a Judge. The Son-in-law and father-in-law finally met. Lorenzo wanted so bad to finally to be with his daughter especially when he fell ill. However, too bad that the turn of events seem not to cooperate at all. My Lola became widowed and at the time she planned to finally meet her father, World War II came unexpectedly. She was very pre-occupied for her safety & her kids. She then married my Lolo Sancho Llagas because news spread that the Japanese took every single women in town. From Baras they fled safety to Mabitac Laguna where they settled for years (had they travelled a few more towns, they could have reached the sfety in Binan, Laguna). After the war was over, they fled back to their hometown in Baras Rizal while securing back their Properties also in Paenaan, Baras, Rizal (near Pinugay & Antipolo Rizal.) My lola never had a chance to meet her father.
    According to my Tita Minerva, my Lola’s daughter from her first husband, during the lifetime of my Lola, she attempted to keep in touch with the Gana’s. They actually had a chance to visit Veronica’s Residence in Quezon City. But Veronica never showed her face.

    It was heart warming that when my relatives from that state finally decided to visit Binan, Lolo Toto spared his time to see them. It was not unusual for such a person like Lolo Toto to seem so trusting at the first time he met my parents & relatives. They set an appointment to meet him at the old Lola “Nena’s” residence which was the residence of Don Lorenzo. As restated by may parents, it’s like a “lukso-ng-dugo.” Lolo Toto felt bad that the only person that could attest the stories already died just a few years ago when thay visited Binan.

    How I hope that somebody from the clan could have information about the the lineage of Felicia Fernandez my Lola to the Gana’s.

    Appreciated your insights. I wanted to know more about ny Grand Lolo.
    It’s like putting a puzzle together with few more piece to complete the picture.

    Until now, the only memory that we of Don Lorenzo kept by the family was an old picture of “Chinese-looking man” a feature that resembles my Lola and very evident among her children from her first husband.

    Really hope that someone, somebody still knew what happened.
    We just wanted to keep in touch with the clan of our roots.

  325. Noni Agulto said,

    April 15, 2010 at 9:40 am

    Hi Marco!

    I know that Don Enchong owns that lovely “victorian inspired house” with beautiful colored glass windows which you will find facing the right side of the Binan Church. Yes i heard that that Veronica is the heiress and an adopted one, for that matter. But the story of Lorenzo’s child…that i couldn’t confirm since the storyteller in the family is long gone….. sayang…

  326. MARCO LLAGAS said,

    April 14, 2010 at 2:32 am

    Sorry about the grammar, I was in hurry while posting the message.
    Hope you could help us confirm the story. If anyone from the Gana’s knew about this please share your insights.

  327. marco llagas said,

    April 13, 2010 at 4:57 pm

    Good day,

    I’m a bit curious about the history of the Gana in Binan.
    I’m tracing my roots as well.
    Kilala nyo po ba si Lorenzo Gana?
    As my Lola’s story goes, she was the daughter of Grand Lolo Lorenzo Gana, however my Lelang refused to give her to the Gana’s & kept her from seeing her father Lorenzo. The old Lorenzo didn’t has a child & adopted Veronica Gana.
    My parent already visited the old ancestral house in BInan & already met Lolo Toto. However, Lolo Toto can no longer attest the story since he was young then. Lola Nena however died around 2000 hence, no one would confirm the if the rumors is true.

    Hope you could help.

    Thanks,

    MARCO LLAGAS
    09081376705

  328. Noni Agulto said,

    April 13, 2010 at 11:56 am

    More interestingly, here is a list of Binan leaders (alcalde, kapitan or gobernadorcillo) from 1757-1898

    1757 Don Antonio de Sta. Rosa
    1758 Don Francsico Mendoza
    1759 Don Agustin Esteban de Mendoza
    1760 Don Bartolome Mariano
    1761 Don Gaspar Artillagas
    1762 Don Manuel Serrano
    1763 Don Gaspar Trinidad
    1764 Don Vicente Delos Santos
    1765 Don Felipe Santiago
    1766 Don Gabriel Tuazon
    1767 Don Gregorio Casimiro
    1769 Don Manuel Enriquez
    1769 Don Agustin Delos Angeles
    1770 Don Juan Delos Reyes
    1771 Don Simon de Leyva
    1772 Don Francisco Pascasio
    1773 Don Felipe Santiago
    1774 Don Domingo de Guzman
    1775 Don Manuel Piraido
    1776 Don Jose Delos Reyes
    1777 Don Anselmo de Ocampo
    1778-79 Don Agustin Delos Santos
    1780 Don Pedro de Rivera
    1781 Don Andres Dimaranan
    1782 Don Francisco de Borja
    1783 Don Francisco Mercado
    1784 Don Francisco dela Cruz
    1785 Don Rafael Naval
    1786 Don Esteban de Mendoza
    1787 Don Hilario Pablo
    1788 Don Pablo delos Reyes
    1789 Don Patricio Carlos
    1790 Don Cipriano Alonzo
    1791 Don Felix Faustino
    1792 Don Gabriel Roque
    1793 Don Francisco Alejandro
    1794 Don Eusebio delos Santos
    1795 Don Pedro de Rivera
    1796 Don Cipriano de Sta. Rosa
    1797 Don Pablo Josef Amoranto
    1798 Don Santiago Cariño
    1799 Don Fernando de Rivera
    1800 Don Eugenio Zarate
    1801 Don Francisco Alejandro
    1802 Don Cipriano Alonzo
    1803 Don Patricio Carlos
    1804 Don Esteban de Ocampo
    1805-06 Don Pablo Josef Amoranto
    1087 Don Felipe Santiago Nery
    1808 Don Juan Mercado
    1809 Don Felizardo Enriquez
    1810 Don Alejandro Rivera
    1811 Don Esteban de Ocampo
    1812 Don Cipriano de Sta. Rosa
    1813 Don Juan Mercado
    1814 Don Juan Francisco Gomez de Rivera
    1815 Don Pablo Josef Amoranto
    1817 Don Tomas de Ocampo
    1818 Don Faustino Dimaranan
    1819 Don Felipe Rubio
    1820 Don Julian Santos Leyva
    1821 Don Pablo Josef Amoranto
    1822 Don Esteban de Ocampo
    1823 Don Pedro Trinidad
    1824 Don Juan Mercado
    1825 Don Placido del Rosario
    1826 Don Gregorio Antonio
    1827 Don Balbino Carlos
    1828 Don Pedro Trinidad
    1829 Don Francisco Bibiano Ochoa
    1830 Don Gaspar delos Reyes Gana
    1831 Don Remigio
    1832 Don Pedro Trinidad
    1833 Don Jose Arevalo
    1834 Don Liberato Teodoro de Castro
    1835 Don Gaspar delos Reyes Gana
    1836 Don Rafael Amoranto
    1837 Don Jose Potenciano
    1841 Don Jose German
    1842 Don Leon Amoranto
    1843 Don Mariano Gregorio
    1844 Don Lorenzo Alberto
    1845 Don Perfecto de Ocampo
    1846-47 Don Jose Potenciano
    1848 Don Antonio Carlos
    1849 Don Martin Alberto
    1850 Don Eulalio Gana
    1851 Don Lazaro Almeda Carlos
    1852 Don Francisco Dimaranan
    1853 Don Jose Gana
    1854 Don Jose Almeda Carlos
    1855 Don Jose Gana
    1856 Don Gregorio Reyes Gana
    1857 Don Juan Carrillo Trinidad
    1858-59 Don Agaton Almeda Carlos
    1860 Don Jose Faustino Cruz
    1861 Don Mariano Potenciano
    1862 Don Ploquinto Baylon
    1863-64 Don Miguel Dimas Yatco
    1865 Don Miguel Marfori Reyes
    1866 Don Claro Almadin
    1867-68 Don Eulalio Gana
    1869-70 Don Cecilio Amoranto
    1871 Don Faustino de Ocampo
    1872 Don Tomas Veracruz
    1873-74 Don Marcelo Reyes
    1875 Don Cecilio Amoranto
    1876 Don Irineo Carrillo Trinidad
    1877-78 Don Agaton Garcia
    1879-81 Don Conrado Gana
    1882 Don Primo Carrillo
    1883-85 Don Ramon Amoranto
    1886-87 Don Eduardo Gana
    1888 Don Andres Almeda
    1889 Don Pablo Potenciano
    1890-91 Don Leoncio Yatco
    1892-93 Don Macario Apelo
    1894 Don Mariano Apelo
    1895-98 Don Jesualdo Gana

    From the list, you will notice the frequency of surnames Carrillo Trinidad, Gana, Potenciano, Almeda, Carlos, Mercado, Arevalo, Alberto-Alonzo and Amoranto thus establishing that these well-known families gained prominence and built their wealth through their political connection while other families particularly the Yaptinchays built their empire through sheer business accumen and strong allegiance to the church.

  329. Noni Agulto said,

    April 13, 2010 at 11:44 am

    to elaborate on Chuchi constantino’s comment…here are the complete entries on the inventory of sugar and rice harvests kept in the kamaligs and the list of slipper and tobacco factories as described in the Pedro Paterno pamphlet….

    1907 Inventory of Rice @ P2.30 per cavan:

    Proprietor Entries (in Cavanes)
    Don Eduardo Gana 14,000
    Don Florentino Guico 11,000
    Doña Macaria Gana 9,000
    Don Quintin Roxas 6,000
    Doña Magdalena Arevalo 9,000
    Don Jose Yatco 7,000
    Doña Josefa Baylon 5,000
    Don Guido Yaptinchay 15,000
    Del Gobo Insular 16,000

    1907 Sugar Inventory @P5.00 per pilon

    Proprietor Entries (in Pilons)
    Don Eduardo Gana 2,500
    Don Jesualdo Gana 4,000
    Doña Crisanta Cruz 1,200
    Don Pedro Velasco 800
    Don Cirilo Almeda Carlos 1,300
    Doña Basilia Dimaranan 1,200
    Don Valentin Chua-Coco 1,200
    Doña Maria Yaptinchay 1,400
    Doña Miguela Carrillo 3,500
    Don Timoteo Yatco 800
    Don Guido Yaptinchay 2,000
    Doña Regina Almeda Carlos 800

    Slipper Factories owned by:

    Teodorico Gemil
    Geronimo Alzona
    Tomas Mercado
    Filomena Carrillo

    Tobacco Factories owned by:

    Florencio Potenciano
    Fernanda Gana
    Esteban Zarraga

  330. Roberto Pronuevo Yatco said,

    April 3, 2010 at 6:42 pm

    Mga relatives,

    Can I have a soft copy of this family tree? Mukhang bigla ako nag ka interest sa roots ko and I found this site while researching.

    Please send it to bobby.yatco@data1asia.com

    By the way buhay pa father ko Gerardo Yatco. Magtanong tanong na din ako sa kanya before he pass away. Malakas pa naman at makulit pa.

    Many thanks

    Bobby Yatco
    Grandson of Fermin Yatco

  331. Presy Guevara said,

    March 22, 2010 at 8:58 pm

    I hope the recent fire that burned down several houses spared the historical homes of Binan. I’ll never forget the hospitality of the Isidro Perlas Family. I have fond memories of the Plaza where they held annual Town Dances back in the 60s.

  332. March 22, 2010 at 2:41 pm

    hello Binanenses,
    i would like to share our family side of yatco-almeda clan,way back 1988 reunion,i will send our family tree and listing of all name from Jose Yatco-Victoria Almeda family tree.
    i have a sister in pennsylvania..myrna yatco villanueva
    thanks
    manning

  333. March 16, 2010 at 4:27 pm

    Ester:

    Thank you so much for sharing wonderful information about Old Binan, Laguna and your Almeda and Garcia families. Without generous people like you, history will be lost to subsequent generations.

    I am so glad that this is turning out to be an active thread by genuine Binanenses about Old Binan, Laguna. The whole town and its inhabitants are reeking with important national/regional, economic, cultural, and social history that must be recorded.

    Keep the interesting, intelligent comments coming!!!

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  334. Ester Wolf said,

    March 16, 2010 at 3:20 pm

    Hello again Toto,

    I recently posted stills that I think were from the early 1930s entitled “Laguna Muses” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfWH1vI33LE). Perhaps readers can take a look and help identify people in the photos. My grandmother is mostly in the shots, some with her cousin, Jesus Garcia, and members of the Almeda clan. Unfortunately, I could not identify the others.

    The majority of the photos were taken in or around the Rizal monument, Biñan, Plaza. If you or readers have visited or live in Biñan, the Ligaya building (that used to be a movie theater) are in a couple of shots. The original building has since been replaced with a supermarket.

    Forgive my grammar, not my best subject, but I hope all will enjoy a trip down memory lane. I grew-up in southern California, knew some but is not too familiar with the families of old other than my immediate ones; I hope Biñan readers will forgive my ignorance. I do remember Lola Flory (Yaptinchay-Evangelista) staying with my family for a while in the late 70s, early 80s. I think she did a lot of traveling during this period.

    Thank you again for your wonderful site Toto.

    Best regards,
    Ester Wolf

  335. Ester Wolf said,

    March 13, 2010 at 12:47 pm

    Sorry, she would have felt “amused” ;-)

    Cheers!

  336. Ester Wolf said,

    March 13, 2010 at 12:25 pm

    Hello Toto,

    I discovered your website a while ago when researching genealogy. Unfortunately, I cannot follow on a regular basis but I’ve always enjoyed reading your posts when I have the chance. Very informative!

    I was surprised that when I was recently searching for information about the Alberto House (that will be relocated) Google cited your blog again, but particularly, this thread about Biñan, my family’s hometown. I read the postings a few times before realizing that you also posted the URLs leading to my family’s 1950s film footage of Biñan. Thank you for sharing them with your readers! Biñan does carry quite a history. My family and I are glad to have been able to share the videos with many even if it was just a few minutes of footage. I hope the footage of Biñan Plaza will plant seeds in younger generations to revitalized and preserve what is still left standing (I wish the same for other towns throughout the Philippines). Even if it is just discussing via your blog and others like it or posting old pictures, there will at least be some recorded dialogue about how small quaint towns, like Biñan, came to be.

    My grandmother was Catalina A. Garcia-Almeda, I fondly remember her as a gregarious, extremely funny and hard-working lady whose roots extend to Sta Rosa and Calamba. Had she lived long enough to see the digital age, I think she would have felt being included in the list of Biñan’s illustrious families on this thread amusing, but very honored.

    Salamat!

    Best regards,
    Ester Wolf
    Pennsylvania, USA

  337. Noni Agulto said,

    February 26, 2010 at 12:30 pm

    hay señor toto.

    overload sa impormasyon. And sorry for being always in a haste and leaving crumbs around your site…(wrong spelling or incomplete statements) you know I suck at typing. Please feel free to clean them up for me….hehehehe…xenxa na

    while i couldn’t seem to get through your blogsite today…. i’d like to share with you an earlier correspondence with second cousin Tito Yaptinchay Zamora. He has some valuable insghts i’d really like to share in our present interaction regarding Old Families of Binan.
    ************************************************************

    Victor Y. Zamora” wrote:
    Is this Noni?

    This Tito Zamora, son of Nena Yaptinchay and third cousin of Eloisa Borah. You are my second cousin. Is your Lolo – Lolo Pinong? I remember him fondly because he was always in the Bahay na Bato during fiestas and doing the lechon!!!

    In any case, I am writing to you to find out how you are doing in your research on the Yaptinchay family tree. I found an interesting article online from a third cousin of ours but I think she has some facts wrong. Here is the article, which you already have seen:
    http://www.pwhs-mfi.org/newsletter/news17/legacy_yaptinchay.htm

    I do not think that it was Alberto Yaptinchay who was born in 1822 and came from China. According to the tombstone in Binan, Alberto Yaptinchay was born in June 18, 1829 and died February 28, 1887. Andres Yaptinchay was born in 1854 and Guido Yaptinchay was born 1859. Maria, their sister, was probably born in 1862 as Loudette will claim. However, based on my mother’s research which is based on Lola Epay’s (a Trinidad-Carillo, wife Lolo Kiko Yaptinchay) stories and Tito Leony Yatco’s family tree documents, the original Yaptinchay was the father of Alberto.

    These are speculations on my part, based on what Loudette says and what my mother says.
    · The original Yaptinchay may have arrived in 1822, when he was fourteen. That would make him 21 years old when he had a son called Alberto in 1829.
    · Lola Epay was a Trinidad-Carillo and the granddaughter of the brother of the woman who married the original Yaptinchay. She must have known the stories at least through her parents or maybe even heard it from Alberto.
    · Loudette says that the original chinese was “adopted” by Spanish friars (Dominicans or Augustinians) in Intramuros. I do not think they refer to Jesuits as friars (Ateneo was also in Intramuros).
    · Somewhere I read that most of the land in Binan might have been friar lands. Here is an interesting article:
    elgu2.ncc.gov.ph/binan/index.php?id1=7 – Note the reference to Dominicans taking control of Biñan in 1757.
    · If the original Yaptinchay was “adopted” by the Friars (Dominicans), then it is not a stretch of imagination that he bought (or given – if he was a “katiwala”) lands from the Dominicans in Biñan and surrounding areas including Cavite.
    · I do not know who the Trinidad-Carillo’s were but they could also have lands and the original chinese could have been a good land manager and businessman to have acquired the lands that the Yaptinchays had at that time.
    · Loudette’s account of “Bertong Intsik” and his two hired hands maybe true but it is not about the original Chinese.
    Now the questions and course of action.
    · I will be in Manila for the first three weeks of June. I would like to do some research but I will need Noni’s help to pave the way.
    · Noni, can you find out if the Dominican’s have any records of people they “adopted” or “baptized” during the the early 1800’s. You can check the Augustinians and Franciscans also. I hope that the wars and fires had not burned them. I can go there in June and do the actual research if the records are confirmed to be still available.
    · The other source could be the Archdiocese records in Intramuros – again baptismal records.
    · Noni, can you find out if the baptismal certificates of the 1800’s still exist in Biñan. I am also afraid that fires might have consumed them. But these records will only show Alberto’s baptism – but it will reveal who his father was (the original chinese?).
    · Noni, in the old Catholic Cemetery in Biñan, at the very back to the right side, there is a big mausoleum of the Yaptinchays. It is normally overgrown with weeds and shrub. Can you go there, and check the names and dates. You may want to bring a help to clear it. I can do it with you in June if you wish.
    · In 2003, I went there and took a picture of Alberto Yaptinchay’s after I cleared some of the brush. I will send you a picture but it is quite big file and you may not receive it due to Yahoo’s file limit. If you don’t, I will upload it to a server and hopefully you can see it. I would like to take pictures again when I go back in June.
    · Some of the other Yaptinchays (like my Lolo Ting) have their bones in the Church in the center of town. You can also check dates in there.
    · Eloisa, how can we approach Loudette to find out where she got her stories. They are intriguing but I think she just made some assumptions on certain things. I see that Noni tried to track her down.
    That is all for now. Remember, these are my assumptions. Are they worth using to track down our ancestor?

    Salamat in advance,
    Tito Zamora

    ************************************************************

    “Victor Y. Zamora” wrote:

    Hi Eloisa and Noni,

    I am reading a biography of Rizal by Austin Craig, 1913, where there are extensive references to Binan because Rizal’s ancestors, both Alonzo and Mercado, are from our town. Rizal’s great-great-grandfather, Domingo Lam-co, was an immigrant from China and settled in Binan in the Dominican Estate of San Isidro Labrador (Barrio Tubigan?). His son, named Francisco Mercado(1731-1801), was alcalde of Binan in1783. The grandson, Juan Mercado, was alcalde in 1808, 1813 and 1823. On Rizal’s mother side, his grandfather was Lorenzo Alberto Alonzo (1790-1854) was the municipal captain of Binan in 1824, around the time Alberto Yaptinchay was born, 1829.

    All references to friar lands in this account are Dominican, not Augustinians. It also appears that the Parian in Manila was under the care of the Dominicans. Rizal’s ancestor was baptized by a Dominican in San Gabriel church in 1642 at the age of 35. The Dominicans were also active from Amoy and these chinese came mainly from Chinchew in Amoy. The friars trusted these chinese to become their inquilinos to manage their farms.

    I just started to read Chushner’s Landed Estates in the Colonial Philippines. In 1624, the principales (or datus) of Binan sold a piece of land called Tanag to the College of Santo Tomas (Dominican). However the following towns were placed under the Augustinians: Tondo (which originally bordered San Mateo, Antipolo, Muntinlupa, Las Pinas), Pasig, Paranaque, Hagonoy and Guadalupe. Jesuits had Antipolo, Taytay and Cainta. In 1745, Binan estate was around 414 sq. miles – quite big!

    I do not know when the Augustinians came into the picture. But at least up to 1745, it looked like it was under the Dominicans.

    That’s all for now,
    Tito

    ***********************************************************************

    diba his insights alone is an information overlaod…..kumbaga sa handaan…buffet kung buffet….hahahahaha

    that’s all for now…..

    best

    noni

  338. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 24, 2010 at 4:42 am

    The highlight of the Holy Wednesday Procession in Binan, Laguna every Holy Week is the carroza of the “Tercera Caida” depicting Christ falling down for the third time on his way to Calvary most of the carroza in the procession have only one image. The “Tercera Caida” however typically has many more and has corresponding greater dramatic impact the spectacular tableau of the “Tercera Caida” is an heirloom of the Potenciano family and has seven figures the fallen Christ, Simon of Cyrene, the Roman captain, a Jew with a whip, a second Jew bearing a lance with the roman insignia SPQR, a Carpenter, and a man with a trumpet. The figures are mounted on an antique carroza with silver panels.

    Irma Ponce-Enrile Potenciano, the clan matriarch, relates that the “Tercera Caida” was inherited by her father-in-law Dr. Conrado G. Potenciano. She believes it to be at least a century old. Dr. Conrado’s only son Dr. Victor Potenciano, founder of the Polymedic Hospital on EDSA, continued the tradition now passed to his widow Irma. When Dr. Victor passed away, she now continued to preserve and maintain the family tradition. An ancestor set aside several hectares of his rice land now know as “bukid Senor” as the image’s endowment.

  339. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 24, 2010 at 4:08 am

    Toto
    Yes Jimmy Laya wrote about the Malolos Constitution Table but he did not identify who owned the table he just said in his book that Viring de Asis sold it to the Central Bank of the Philippines when the people of the CBP wanted to verify if the story is correct Viring already passed away fortunately her driver remembered the table’s origin in Paco Manila and also the owner an old lady it was Monetary Board Member Toting Bunye who told that the table belonged to the descendants of the Yaptinchay-Yatco family of Biñan, Laguna

    Correction in my haste i made a mistake in my comment # 13

    If anyone could dare ask L*di*g Ol*d*n about the story of how she acquired her house in Park Rd in North Forbes Park from Tessie Yaptinchay, please tell me her side of the story i would appreciate it

  340. Alicia Perez said,

    February 23, 2010 at 11:00 am

    “Tita Flory” Flora Yatco Yaptinchay-Evangelista was one memorable character of not-too-Old Binan. She was the pampered youngest daughter of Pablo Yaptinchay and Leonila “Ilay” Yatco and she was as assertive — “loud and brassy” according to family members — as she was rich. She was known for driving her mild-mannered husband, distinguished academician and President of FEU Far Eastern University Dr. Teodoro Evangelista, literally up the wall. According to a prominent lady writer, Flory “opened fire” at Teddy anytime, anywhere, in front of anybody and he couldn’t do anything about it.

  341. Noni Agulto said,

    February 23, 2010 at 10:03 am

    correction…. not a foot but 18 inches to be eaxct as said by Mr. Tino…hehehe =)

  342. Noni Agulto said,

    February 23, 2010 at 9:59 am

    To Enrique Bustos:

    Yes the “Desposorio” or the “Matrimonio” (of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Joseph) is still intact in the OLY Estate… =) It is composed of 3 figures, BVM, Joseph and the “priest”. about a foot each, all in solid ivory…. you can see how the figures bend to the side following the natural curve of the elephant tusk….
    also worth noting is the silver “ochovado” carroza and the Resurrected Christ with solid silver vestments.

    And i’m so happy with Chuchi Constantino’s comment…. the names of Don Edilberto Ocampo and Don Pablo Potenciano came up. Edilberto Ocampo owns the house almost infront of the Alberto House at the town plaza…. Albertos and Ocampos are said to be cousin families. Don Edilberto i think was married to Paz MRYatco (of the Yatco tres marias – Salud M.R. Yatco vda de Perlas, Leonila M.R.Yatco – Yaptinchay, and Paz M.R. Yatco – Ocampo)

    Surnames such as Gemil and Lopez de Leon came up as well…. yes, they are part of binan’s old principalia.

    I’m not so sure if it was Don Jesualdo Gana or Don Eulalio Gana who was gobernadorcillo at that time.

    all the info here is getting to be overwhelming…..=)

    noni

  343. February 22, 2010 at 6:24 pm

    Enrique:

    If I remember right, former Central Bank Governor Jaime C. Laya wrote about that particular table. His account can be read in his book “Consuming Passions” about Philippine art and antiques.

    Toto Gonzalez

  344. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 22, 2010 at 5:18 pm

    A grand narra table owned by the Central Bank of the Philippines, noticeable for its ornate legs with floral and foliate design. The 19th century Regency-style table was used at the Barasaoin Church during the first Philippine Congress in 1899. It was were the Malolos Constitution was signed. The table was baptized and thereafter know as the “Malolos Constitution table”; its former owners, the descendants of the Yaptinchay-Yatco family of Biñan, Laguna.

    According to Martin I. Tinio, the Yaptinchay-Alberto house* in Binan was offered for sale to the Intramuros Administration in 1982. The I.A. consultants visited the house. They said the house was nothing great but the stuff inside it was memorable: they had to rooms full of virinas containing ivories with exquisite 22 carat or coin gold metalworks. The best piece however, was an 18th century tableau depicting “The Marriage of the Virgin and Saint Joseph” 18-inch figures in solid ivory with polychrome. The Yaptinchays also had Sheraton-style side tables with bone-inlay for the display of the virinas and an unusual brass lantern imbedded in a wall between the ante-cocina and the kitchen so one candle could shed light on two rooms.

    And if anyone there could ask L*di*g Ol*d*n about the story of how she acquired her house in North Forbes Park from Tessie Yaptinchay, please tell me her side…

    *Guido Yaptinchay married Agustina Alberto

  345. Chuchi Constantino said,

    February 21, 2010 at 9:44 pm

    Hi Toto!

    Greetings! You are very welcome. Kudos for making possible all these very interesting intersections.

    All the best,
    Chuchi

  346. February 19, 2010 at 5:53 pm

    Chuchi:

    Thank you so much for that fantastic, factual piece of information!!! Much appreciated!!!

    Cheers!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  347. Chuchi Constantino said,

    February 19, 2010 at 5:45 pm

    Pedro Paterno’s 1907 pamphlet “Through the First District of Laguna,” Binan’s influentials listed: Eduardo Gana, Jesualdo Gana, Edilberto Ocampo, Ramon Ocampo, Pablo Potenciano, Clemente Carillo, Santiago Carillo, Lucas Padua, Ildefonso Veracruz, Leoncio Yatco, Guido Yaptinchay, Pablo Yaptinchay, Isidro Yatco, Pedro Lopez de Leon, Florentino Guico, Ciriaco Gana, Pastor de Silva, Basilio Maravilla, Cirilo Carlos, Claudio Carino, Mariano Yaptinchay, Filomeno Gana and Vicente Ocampo. There were 30 slipper factories, tobacco factories, rice mills, rice bodegas owned by Gemil, Potenciano, the Carillos, Almacen, Mercado, Ganas, Zarraga, etc. Rice bodegas. Insular govt 16,000 cavanes, Guido Yaptinchay 15,000, Eduardo Gana 14,000, Macaria Gana 9,000, Magdalena Arevalo 9,000, Quintin Rojas 6,000, Josefa bailon 5,000, Maria Yaptinchay 1,400 Valentin Cua-Coco 1,200. Jose Yatco 7,000 etc. 1903 population: 9,563 Reference: Laguna in American Times by Lewis Gleeck Jr.

  348. Noni Agulto said,

    February 19, 2010 at 9:54 am

    I took the liberty of lifting from my Flickr.com thread [ "Blue-blooded Yapster" ] a response from distant cousin Mike Potenciano Almendral…

    Mike said:
    “From what I remember, the house of Lorenzo Alberto was sold to Doña Margarita Arevalo in the late 19th century and passed on to Isabel ‘Ñora Abe’ Marco. Her daughter Pilar then married a descendant of the original Albertos, thus ‘reclaiming’ their ancestral house. They were already wealthy in the 1700’s and they’re still wealthy now. An unbroken line of legitimate Dons and Doñas to this day.”

  349. Toffee Tionko said,

    February 19, 2010 at 3:20 am

    Good read. Love it. Thanks for sharing.

    Cheers!

  350. Noni Agulto said,

    February 16, 2010 at 5:17 pm

    By: Ms. Loudette Tapia-Tolosa ( great great-granddaughter of Alberto Yaptinchay and daughter of Dolores Almeda and Isabelo Tapia )

    The Legacy of Alberto Yaptinchay

    SOME devotions begin as simple rituals that are passed down from generation to generation. And so it is with the story of Alberto Yaptinchay and his devotion to the souls in purgatory.
    Alberto Yaptinchay was born in 1822 Xiamen, China. To escape the poverty of the mainland, he took a slow boat bound for the Philippines at the age of fourteen. He landed in Manila and was adopted by the Spanish friars in Intramuros. They baptized and taught him the Christian way of life. Alberto was diligent in his chores and took the Catholic teachings seriously. He grew up at the seminary and saved his earnings through the work given to him by the Spanish friars.
    Alberto knew that he wanted to have his own land and once he had enough savings, he bought himself a stretch of rice fields in Binan, Laguna. Alberto worked hard, cultivating his land and turning it into one rich with harvest. Yet he did not forget the teachings of the Spanish friars. Alberto was also an active parishioner of Binan and had a special devotion for the souls in purgatory. He would offer masses for them and gave very generous donations for that intention. The townspeople soon grew to respect and love him, fondly calling him Bertong Intsik.
    Alberto finally decided to get married and had a daughter named Maria who was born in 1862. Often, his wife and Maria would go to town, while Alberto would keep on working on his land with his two farm hands. His hard work paid off and allowed him to buy even more lands.
    News got around of Alberto’s wealth. One day, while Maria and his wife were in town, Alberto, who was looking over his lands, noticed a group of bandits riding toward his house. He ran inside and grabbed his guns. Together with his two farm hands, he hid behind some trees and aimed his gun at them. They were outnumbered for he had counted at least half a dozen men. When the robbers were but a few meters from the house, they suddenly stopped. Then they turned around and left. It was said that the bandits saw about a hundred men and women, all dressed in white, having a party at the house. The robbers got so confused that they decided to just leave. After this, Alberto’s devotion for the souls in purgatory grew stronger.
    When he died he set aside the produce of 20 hectares of his land for masses offered for the souls in purgatory and all his dead relatives. This legacy continued with his daughter Maria and her husband, Alberto Almeda, who then passed it on to their children. Though his grandchildren divided up Alberto’s lands, they carried on the custom. His great
    grandchildren held on to his wishes and Dolores Almeda even put up a foundation especially for the intention of the souls in purgatory. Also included in the foundation is the financial support given to secular priests and seminarians who want to become priests. This is in remembrance of the Spanish friars that adopted Alberto Yaptinchay.
    What once was a simple ritual has become a devotion passed down from generation to generation. And it all began with a little Chinese boy that sailed into Manila.

    ***********************************************

    Hi Toto!

    This is an article I came across many years ago… the story is interesting but the facts are a bit mixed up.

    1: Alberto was born here in the Philippines…in 1822. Tin Chay Yap and his older brother/father were the ones born in Xiamen at earlier dates according to Tita Nena’s account.

    2: Alberto’s wife was Macaria (Gana). Maria, who was the only child mentioned in the story, was his 4th child in chronological order, Julia being the panganay, Andres the second, Guido the 3rd, and Maria, followed by Raymunda, Josefa, Bibiana and lastly Pablo.

    3: In Tita Nena’s (Y. Zamora…yes her real name is Concepcion) story, it was Tin Chay Yap (with the help of his brother bringing him here to the country) who was adopted and raised by the Spanish friars. And as Tito Zamora and I were suspecting, Binan, being formerly part of the Augustinian and Dominican hacienda (successively), was where Tin Chay Yap started working to acquire and cultivate his land in increments. In Binan, Carmona and Silang areas, the “Alberto Yaptinchay” holdings would have reached an estimate of 400 hectares (in lump, but spread across the 3 towns)

    And at the peak of the Yaptinchay wealth, some 200 to 300 hectares more of separate holdings in nearby towns of Santa Rosa and Cabuyao were identified with the siblings Maria Gana Yaptinchay-Almeda, Guido Gana Yaptinchay, and Pablo Gana Yaptinchay.

    One object of my curiosity is where was the original house of Alberto Y.? I suspect, the house of Tito Oscar is the real house of Don Alberto and Maria Carrillo – eventually passed on to Julia who then married Cirilo Carlos. It is situated not at the plaza but on its outskirt, suggesting a more modest status at their time. Also Kuya Tito suggested that the Carrillos may not have been landed (at the time of Maria Carrillo Trinidad) but merely tenants since they were not yet allowed to own land (which was then part of the church haciendas), similar to the status of the Mercado-Rizals.

    In this note, this story may also explain the reason why the Domingo en Alvis (tama ba) or low Sunday celebration has always be associated with the Casas Family. It is at the Casas house where the mass is celebrated after a procession of the Holy Eucharist from the church to casa casas. The sick and elderly are gathered and fed after the mass.

    Sorry kuya Toto, this is a very biased insight and solely dedicated to the Yaptinchay family. kasi this comes in very handy. I have a booklet on old binan, which is very interesting, I’ll try to scan it so that you can read, just to have a better understand of Binan’s history.

    Also you may have missed out on the Garcia, Cruz and Baylon Families, but kasi we have very little information about them. Also there are important surnames to take note of old Binan Intsiks such as the Yapchulay and Lim-Aco. These surnames, along with Yatco, Lim, Yaptinchay, Yap, Lao play an important part in the formation of a special devotion of the Filipino Chinese Binanenses to their patron San Isidro Labrador, hence the Pistang Intsik every 23rd of May (sort of a pasiyam by the Chinese merchants as a form of thanksgiving for in your own words, “Binan’s economic preeminence”.

    Also further to my speculations…… since there is no account to what happened with the older brother/father of Tin Chay Yap who brought him in to the country….. could it be that he was there all along?….. on the side …hiding behind the name Chu Lay Yap (Yapchulay). Wild guess lang but interesting….. and no one could answer me …..hahahahaha

    Also during the 19th century, merchants from neighboring Rizal province ( such as the Concepcions and Marasigans ) traveling through Laguna de Bay found themselves settling in Binan.

    best,

    Noni

  351. Noni Agulto said,

    February 16, 2010 at 10:39 am

    I forgot to mention that the Albertos are of Portuguese-Chinese ancestry – MACANESE to be exact.

  352. Noni Agulto said,

    February 16, 2010 at 10:22 am

    The rumors about the Alberto house are all SO TRUE. True story, undeniably…. come to think of it, its present state is no less miserable than it is when it falls totally flat to the ground. The house as you will see it in some of our friends’ Flickr.com posts is in a “Godforsaken” state. Flanked by two annexes of a second-rate supermarket, and its facade all covered with political billboards, its prominently “Chinese” tiled roof severely damaged, and a fleet of “gotohans” and barbecue stalls ( not to mention gallons of human, dog, cat and whathaveyou urine generously showered daily along its fortified walls ) surrounding the once proud “palacio” of the fabled Alberto and Marco dons.

    A sad fact for Binan’s most important architectural landmark.

    Most of Binan’s families are basically of Chinese ancestry. Yatco, Yaptinchay, Tang-Gana, Guico, Lim-Aco, Yapchulay to name a few… sorry to have missed out on the other “taal” na taga-Binan who were not mentioned.

    There are so many things that Binanenses could be proud of… from the stately houses to the gold mine of antique processional images and “carrozas.” One of which is the unique tradition of a “Fiestang Intsik” – “Pistang Intsik,” Binan being a Chinese enclave as Toto mentioned. It falls on the 23rd of May. Nine days after the fiesta of Binan’s patron San Isidro Labrador – sort of a “pasiyam” – a once lavish and festive celebration as a form of thanksgiving for the blessings being enjoyed by the merchants and hacenderos – the Chinese of Binan. And these families that Toto has so accurately enumerated played an important part in the birth and propagation of this quite unique tradition. =)

  353. February 15, 2010 at 11:54 am

    My father, Augusto Beda Arnedo Gonzalez [ 1932 - 1990 ], was a gentleman survivor from the old world. He was the son of a hacendero, rice and sugar magnate, and industrialist after all. Lost and bitter in a Post-1972 agrarian reform milieu, he nevertheless remained productive, prosperous, and dignified. Having come from the old world, he knew exactly which known families mattered and which didn’t. For him, every other known family was a bunch of criminals or a bunch of social climbers. Very little impressed him, if at all.

    “They called her a ‘socialite.’ When I met her, she was as dark as the underside of a frying pan and her feet were as dirty as a carabao’s. You call that ‘muchacha’ a ‘socialite’?”

    “What tycoon? He used to live above a cheap nightclub along Taft avenue and serve the customers ‘cerveza’ when the waiters were absent.”

    “Millionaires? They were out there on Echague hawking their wares… at least until they discovered the wonders of smuggling.”

    **********************************************************************
    Given my father’s cynicism and sarcasm, I half-expected the dish on practically everyone I mentioned to him.

    One day in early 1987, we were together in the car, just the two of us, driving to a nice Chinese restaurant for dinner. Somewhere along the way, I casually mentioned that a good friend’s mother was a Yaptinchay from Binan, Laguna…

    “Yaptinchay siya?” he pondered, mildly surprised.

    “YAPTINCHAY! MAYAMAN ANG MGA IYAN SA BINAN!” he declared proudly, with total conviction in his voice.

    In all of the 23 years I spent with my father [ from 1967 to 1990 ], only two families were accorded those signal honors: the Yaptinchay of Binan, Laguna and the Bautista of Malolos, Bulacan.

    No one else. :P

    Toto Gonzalez

  354. Alicia Perez said,

    February 15, 2010 at 10:33 am

    From the “Barangay Yaptinchay” website:

    REUNION DAY, JUNE 27, 1998

    Dear YAPTINCHAY Family Members,

    I would like to share with each and everyone of you, the first episode of our lives and well being. Many of us have wandered this far from our native land and may even wonder where our roots came from. On this occasion, I would like to elucidate from whence our family came.

    According to Tia Epay (JOSEFA CARRILLO TRINIDAD), wife of Tio Kiko Yaptinchay, the first YAP TIN CHAY (YAP is the family name and TIN CHAY is the first name) who migrated to the Philippines was still a CHIQUITO (meaning a very young kid). Because of his youthful appearance, he was registered as son to his OLDER brother, because that was the easiest way to bring him into the country. He learned his trade from his OLDER brother (father).

    He met MARIA CARRILLO TRINIDAD, who belonged to a prominent family in Biñan, Laguna, whom he later married. The couple had a son, ALBERT CT YAPTINCHAY (please take notice that the family name YAPTINCHAY as currently used is the combined first and last name of the original ancestral root, and which all his descendants continue to use) and two daughters, namely: SIMEONA and ISABEL. ALBERTO married MACARIA GANA and they had 8 children, namely: Julia, Andres, Guido, Maria, Raymunda, Bibiana, Josefa and Pablo. SIMEONA married ANICETO YATCO and their children were: Petrona, Fermin, Pascuala, Angela and Maria. ISABEL married PEDRO GUICO and had 2 children, namely: Anastacio and Faustino. We are all the descendants of the above.

    As you go through the attached FAMILY TREE**, you will notice that WE all belong to a BIG YAPTINCHAY CLAN. All Yaptinchays from Alberto, Yatcos from Simeona and Guicos from Isabel are all related. Anyway, there are some who carry our OLD MAN’s name but who are not blood relatives, but of course they are welcome if they are legally adopted. Our family is so big that some of us left our country of birth and migrated to the different parts of the world, i.e., USA, CANADA, EUROPE, etc.

    The descendants of Alberto Yaptinchay married to Macaria Gana are related to the Gana ancestral root of Biñan, Laguna. Dr. Leony Yatco, husband of Dr. Lety Yaptinchay, made the research of the YAPTINCHAY FAMILY ROOTS, with a few corrections that I made, which were all incorporated with this accompanying FAMILY TREE**.

    WELCOME TO THE CLAN AND ENJOY OUR FIRST REUNION ON SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 1998. GOD BLESS YOU ALL.

    My Love to All of You,

    Ate or Tita or Auntie or Lola Nena

    [signed]

  355. Noni Agulto said,

    February 15, 2010 at 10:02 am

    I’ve read it and …that looked like an excellent start coming from somebody who’s not even from Binan.

    I don’t even know how to build up on it since i guess all of us know only bits and pieces.

    I think the Oldest Gana on record (Vicente Tang-Gana) must have been in the the Philippines as early as the late 1700s because Don Alberto Yaptinchay (who was 2 generations younger) was born 1822.

    The Albertos are of Macanese ancestry.

    The Carrillos form part of the core families of Binan…and have a prominent counterpart (concurrently that time) in neigboring Carmona, Cavite .

    ( Binan Carrillos used the complete surname Carrillo-Trinidad, but dropped the Trinidad after an incident. ).

    The oldest Yaptinchay was a (magtitimon) rower of a Chinese vessel from Xiamen bound for Manila. the old “Yaptinchay” brought in the chiquito brother Tin Chay Yap and introduced him as his “son”. From then on tin chay yap was said to have been adopted by intramuros friars… probably agustinians….. because during the time they arrived in the Philippines, Binan was still part of the Augustinian Province ( i don’t know if i got my dates correct…or else dominican ang nag ampon sa kanya). you may read an excerpt from the Barangay Yaptinchay website:

    “”According to Tia Epay (JOSEFA CARRILLO TRINIDAD), wife of Tio Kiko Yaptinchay, the first YAP TIN CHAY (YAP is the family name and TIN CHAY is the first name) who migrated to the Philippines was still a CHIQUITO (meaning a very young kid). Because of his youthful appearance, he was registered as son to his OLDER brother, because that was the easiest way to bring him into the country. He learned his trade from his OLDER brother (father).”

    “He met MARIA CARRILLO TRINIDAD, who belonged to a prominent family in Biñan, Laguna, whom he later married. The couple had a son, ALBERT CT YAPTINCHAY (please take notice that the family name YAPTINCHAY as currently used is the combined first and last name of the original ancestral root, and which all his descendants continue to use) and two daughters, namely: SIMEONA and ISABEL. ALBERTO married MACARIA GANA and they had 8 children, namely: Julia, Andres, Guido, Maria, Raymunda, Bibiana, Josefa and Pablo. SIMEONA married ANICETO YATCO and their children were: Petrona, Fermin, Pascuala, Angela and Maria. ISABEL married PEDRO GUICO and had 2 children, namely: Anastacio and Faustino. We are all the descendants of the above.”

    As you go through the attached FAMILY TREE**, you will notice that WE all belong to a BIG YAPTINCHAY CLAN. All Yaptinchays from Alberto, Yatcos from Simeona and Guicos from Isabel are all related. Anyway, there are some who carry our OLD MAN’s name but who are not blood relatives, but of course they are welcome if they are legally adopted. Our family is so big that some of us left our country of birth and migrated to the different parts of the world, i.e., USA, CANADA, EUROPE, etc.””

    The descendants of Alberto Yaptinchay married to Macaria Gana are related to the Gana ancestral root of Biñan, Laguna. Dr. Leony Yatco, husband of Dr. Lety Yaptinchay, made the research of the YAPTINCHAY FAMILY ROOTS, with a few corrections that I made, which were all incorporated with this accompanying FAMILY TREE**.” an excerpt from the late Concepcion Yaptinchay – Zamora.

    I have to ask around for other information.

    best,

    Noni

  356. Enrique Bustos said,

    February 15, 2010 at 8:28 am

    By GEMMA CRUZ-ARANETA

    Over the weekend, I was informed by a cousin, also a relative of Jose Rizal, that the Alberto house in Biñan will most probably end up in a seaside resort in Bagac, Bataan. She was quite baffled by that unconfirmed report because she had not heard about the Bagac project, and worst of all, she had never been to the Alberto house in Biñan.

    The Bagac project, “Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar” is Mr. Jerry Acuzar’s (of San Jose Builders fame) “Royal City” on a 400-hectare preserve on the shores of the South China Sea. Marketed as the “new Spanish colonial village,” it is a rather obsessive accumulation of vintage structures, mostly residential, some historically significant, harvested from Cagayan up north, La Union, Pampanga, Nueva Ecija, Bulacan, Laguna; among the latest acquisitions are houses from Quiapo and Binondo.

    These architectural legacies are lovingly assembled, plank by plank, with 50 to 60 percent accuracy, according to resident artist Jose Puig Ceriola. Grouping vintage structures into “villages” is not a new idea and Mr. Acuzar probably visited a lot of these delightful tourist destinations in his journeys abroad. At best, the “Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar” could be justified as a last-ditch effort to salvage heritage.

    However, when it concerns Alberto house in Biñan where Teodora Alonso and Jose Rizal once lived, though at different periods, I cannot help but feel a personal loss. Since Mr. Acuzar has successfully accumulated capital to finance his whims and dreams, why can’t he restore the Alberto house “in situ?” He would be doing Binan a great favor.

    By restoring and conserving a landmark house right where it was originally built, at the corner of the plaza, in front of the church, Mr. Acuzar would, in fact, could bring to life a forgotten page of this nation’s history.

    Evidently, he is clever enough to give the heritage house adaptive re-use so it can be a self-sustaining endeavor, if not a very profitable one. That may even raise the value of real estate in the area, attract more tourists and create livelihood in corollary sectors, thus making a positive impact on the community.

    I do hope Mr. Jerry Acuzar makes a paradigm shift to the authentic side of heritage conservation. He is probably the only one around who can very well afford to do it.


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