Width and Girth

My father Augusto Beda Arnedo Gonzalez [ "Beda" o 27 May 1932 - + 08 August 1990 ] passed away of diabetic complications [ what else? ] on 08 August 1990 while on a tour of the United States.   

We commemorated the first anniversary of his passing on 08 August 1991.  We held a Mass and a dinner for family and friends at the family home.

After the Mass, the regal Dona Luz “Lucing” Sarmiento de Panlilio was elegantly seated in the living room and was looking outwards to the terrace.  My uncle Brother Andrew, his first Cousin Bienvenido “Dodong” Gonzalez Jr., and two other gentlemen were talking just outside the double doors.  All were big men with width and girth.

She turned to her grandson Joey and remarked:  “You see those gentlemen there, hijo?  That is how the gentlemen looked in my time!!!  They were big and tall and had ‘carriage’!!!  They had ‘empaque’!!!  That is how men should look like!!!  Not like the men these days, who look starved like the ‘casamac’!!!”

Dona Luz lived through the last golden days of the Pampango landowning gentry from the PreWar to the 1950s.  Her husband, Don Jose “Pepe” Panlilio of Bacolor, was a true gentleman of the Old World.  He occupied himself with aristocratic pursuits.  After The War,  He liked to entertain frequently with elegant soirees at their Santa Mesa Heights residence.  He was a very big man.  His idea of a small snack was a big bowl heaping with luxurious, carabao milk “Pastillas de Leche” which he consumed by himself.

In those days, corpulence was a status symbol.  It implied that one had the considerable resources to eat very well and not work very hard physically.

I wonder what Dona Luz Panlilio and her kind would think of the fashionable men these days with their lean physiques, muscles and six-pack abdominals…???  In their time, only the “casamac” farm tenants / laborers looked like that…!!!   :P   :P   :P

         

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10 Comments

  1. August 11, 2013 at 6:25 am

    i really admire mayor yabut and his accomplishments in makati. most of our rich people in p i started from scratch. the only ones with wealth were the remnants of the spaniards because they grabbed the resources of other people in asia, africa, and the americas. i hope these rich ones should do business in the p i and hire millions of poor pinoys, not their relatives.

  2. raquel said,

    August 2, 2007 at 11:23 pm

    I have been wondering, all these years, whatever happened to the 2 beautiful daughters of Mayor Yabut. I had the opportunity to meet two pretty Yabut young ladies when I cross-enrolled in Adamson University for a summer program on or about summer of 1973.

  3. January 20, 2007 at 3:55 pm

    It happens that I do not know all the histories of all Pampango families. That’s why I value people like you who know so much. Do tell us of your Yabut forebears. I will also look into the files of the JDN CKS at HAU in Angeles City.

    But perhaps the most interesting part of Yabut family history nonpareil was during the Marcos Era. Tell us about those years. You certainly had a privileged insider’s look during those times, and those 21 years, bar none, were truly incredible ones in Filipino history!!!

    I absolutely enjoy your comments, and I’m sure that sentiment is shared by the 20,000 readers of this blog!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    What I remember about the Yabut lineage?

    Hmmm.

    For one thing, my mom’s elder relatives would still attend the grand fiestas in San Fernando, in Macabebe, in Lubao, et al all the way from the Visayas…they only stopped after 1985 when we were scattered in the wind across different plane tickets and time zones.

    The tias would fly to Manila and we will meet them. Within a day or two they (then) would find themselves paying a visit to Mayor Yabut either at his house (they would always use the Arnaiz route…) or to the Makati city hall.

    Oh by the way, in the city hall it was so funny they said. When I was old enough to understand the insatiable nature of men, they would always giggle among themselves who among the pretty girls in the city hall Mayor Nemesio was making a “parausan.” Mom candidly calls it…”your Lolo Nemesio’s flavor of the month…como tu sorbetes…como Magnolia Ice Cream anak….”

    It was always fun to check on the Mayor they said. They would rarely speak of money. Just mindless, funny insider-politicking and them teasing the Mayor to stop siring all of these illegitimate kids that they hear out and about. They were all candid about it. All of them close playmates of their childhood back in Pampanga.

    “O ayan Nemesio. Sabi ng driver ko macati daw riyan (referring to his crotch) kaya ka naging alcalde dito eh!”

    He was very, very, very fond of beautiful women. Those with silky skin and long black hair.

    And the good mayor would say that it’s his only fulfilling past time and they ought to remember how his looked similar to their lolo’s caballitos trolling the roads back in their province.

    “Malaki case ate. Kailangang macamut paminsan minsan.”

    And laugh they did.

    The mayor would regale them with stories of the recent musings in Makati. Or ask my mama’s tias why in the world the First Lady will do another beautification project here and there.

    He would always say that since our branch transplanted ourselves in the South under a different nom de plume or specifically using their mother’s maiden name instead— that we would know more about the goings-on in the ever-energetic mind of the First Lady.

    Which we did not.

    He loudly complained that his compadres/cronies and other people who depend on their jobs in the cities get sidelined whenever such things happened.

    The question always ends up, one way or another, unanswered.

    Matters such as those we wisely refused to elaborate on lest we suffer the iron hand from Olot.

    So almost always the end of the short family gathering would end, just as it began, with a tight hug and loud banter in Capampangan.

    Mom was always proud to say that our Lolo Nemesio positioned his children well into Manila Society. The boys were polo playing playboys and his girls married into magnificently well-to-do families, one of which is the R*mon Coj*angco fortune.

    After 1986, especially when B*nay was positioned /installed by Ninoy’s widow, things changed drastically.

    Had it not for my father being a member of the same fraternity as B*nay’s we would not have been able to safely close and move our investments out of Makati.

    I mean, he would charge so much money. So much lagay. We didn’t even have to pay that much in San Juan and even in Ortigas/Pasig!

    He decimated everything, especially my mom’s tia’s negocios and contacts. They would always lament that

    “Kung buhay lang si Nemesio… Hindi puede yan kay Nemesio. Yang negrito na iyang si B*nay.”

    But of course Mayor Yabut’s long passed to oblivion. Nowadays, his children have become consultants and polo instructors, associated with the D*pasquiers and the Aguir*es. Legal children of his that is.

    Without Nemesio Yabut our name would be lost in the annals of Pampango society. With him the Yabuts became more popular in the city…far more ubiquitous than in Pampanga.

  4. benigno arceo said,

    January 9, 2007 at 7:02 pm

    Toto,how are you? I sure hope you are feeling much better. You are amazing! You should write a book. Do you know anything about my grandfather Benigno V. Arceo? Husband of Dona Honorata D. Arnedo. They call him Caviteno. I think he comes from Cavite and Batangas. What about the Arnedos, how far back can you go. They are so fair in complexion, must have a lot of Spanish blood in them. Me, I am never mistaken for a Filipino, always a Chinese, Japanese, even a Mongolian. Thanks, Beny

  5. December 14, 2006 at 2:03 pm

    xxxx:

    It happens that I do not know all the histories of all Pampango families. That’s why I value people like you who know so much. Do tell us of your Yabut forebears. I will also look into the files of the JDN CKS at HAU in Angeles City.

    But perhaps the most interesting part of Yabut family history nonpareil was during the Marcos Era. Tell us about those years. You certainly had a privileged insider’s look during those times, and those 21 years, bar none, were truly incredible ones in Filipino history!!!

    I absolutely enjoy your comments, and I’m sure that sentiment is shared by the 20,000 readers of this blog!!!

    Toto Gonzalez

  6. xxxx said,

    December 14, 2006 at 3:08 am

    Arggghh. I have to go. It is 10:00PM already. I am sleepy and misspellings abound. *embarrassing*

    Voy a dormir.

  7. xxxx said,

    December 14, 2006 at 3:06 am

    By the way, do write about the Yabuts of San Simon/ Macabebe. I would like to know more of my mother’s family. They left Pampanga to strike it out for the hinterlands of Samar and Leyte right before World War 2 and only my mother’s old aunts remember their cousins who are now long dead.

  8. xxxx said,

    December 14, 2006 at 3:04 am

    I agree with you.

  9. November 16, 2006 at 4:29 pm

    Cousin Paz:

    The old people before definitely had a bias about being thin. They equated it with all sorts of problems: financial, psychological, emotional, physical [ health ], etc.. But they actually had a point. *hint* *hint*

    As one writer said: “There is a difference between a rich person on a fashionable diet and a poor person who cannot afford to eat well. There is a difference between a rich chubby person and a poor fat person. There is a difference between someone who grew up rich and someone who grew up poor but became rich. It shows in the eyes, the facial expressions, the speech, the armature, the movements, the attitude, the totality of being…”

    I think I’m being politically incorrect.

    Like I care.

    Toto Gonzalez

  10. cousin paz said,

    November 16, 2006 at 5:43 am

    My mom had another term for the “casamac” look. Something as graphic as mukhang “tisiko rematado!” Or someone who is a candidate for residency at QI! Hahahahaha…


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